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The Angry Blue Mantis!
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Change it at 100-200 miles instead! :cheers

I just hit the 200 mile mark on my 2 month old FZ6. After reading several articles on motor oil's and motorcycle oils I decided to go against the owner's manual suggested 600 mile 1st oil change and change mine early...

Man am I glad I did! :)

I ran the bike to operating temp and drained the oil...it came out quite dark and had a good bit of metal particles in it as seen when the sun was shining on the oil! It looked about how motor oil coming out of my car looks after 3,000 miles with the addition of the fine metal flakes!

The one article I read that convinced me to do an early change said "...motorcycle engines are going to do 90% of their breaking in, shaving off bits of metal as the parts wear, during the first 100-200 miles...Why would you want all those metal shavings floating around in your engine for another 500 miles?!!" The condition of the oil after 200 miles proves this is true (unless my motor is just in terrible shape from the factory).

I plan to do the second change at 1,000 miles and then I'll go 2500 per change from there on out.
 

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Lickalotapuss
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I agree with you. You can't change it too much. I usually change it twice before the first recommended change on a new bike :)
 

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except the need to change ur oil again in a few hundred miles.. lol
 

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FIZZER6 said:
Change it at 100-200 miles instead! :cheers

I just hit the 200 mile mark on my 2 month old FZ6. After reading several articles on motor oil's and motorcycle oils I decided to go against the owner's manual suggested 600 mile 1st oil change and change mine early...

Man am I glad I did! :)

I ran the bike to operating temp and drained the oil...it came out quite dark and had a good bit of metal particles in it as seen when the sun was shining on the oil! It looked about how motor oil coming out of my car looks after 3,000 miles with the addition of the fine metal flakes!

The one article I read that convinced me to do an early change said "...motorcycle engines are going to do 90% of their breaking in, shaving off bits of metal as the parts wear, during the first 100-200 miles...Why would you want all those metal shavings floating around in your engine for another 500 miles?!!" The condition of the oil after 200 miles proves this is true (unless my motor is just in terrible shape from the factory).

I plan to do the second change at 1,000 miles and then I'll go 2500 per change from there on out.

The reason the oil looked like that is because, if I remember correctly, Yamaha uses a special break-in additive. An additive that should remain in your engine for the recommended 600 miles. The oil subject is a dead horse, and everyone does their own thing. I'm not going to change your mind and make you realize that too frequent of oil changes is pointless and wasteful, so I will not even try. Cheers:cheers
 

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Just remember to still keep the revs down through the break in mileage. Grinding down the cylinders is only the first part of the break in. After that, the longer part of it is to temper the moving parts in the engine so they wont yield as much under thermal stress (high revs) and cause unecessary wear.
 

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The Angry Blue Mantis!
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
They don't put anything special in the "break in" oil. I asked a friend about that who used to work at a powersports dealer. It's just the standard manufacturer's recommended oil.

I can't see how changing it can hurt. All that gunk was clogging up the filter, likely causing decreased oil flow and therefor decreased lubrication. I installed a Bosch Premium filter (the one that is 1/2" longer than stock) for increased filtering capacity to pick up more contaminants. I know everyone has their own way of breaking in an engine, I'm sure none are really that much better than others but I'll err on the side of conservative.
 

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Hate to hijack your thread, but...

You've got an '06 and you've only done 200 miles. Do less stressin' an more ridin.
 

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believe me, you're engine would need to grenade itself before the filter clogs up.
 

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NOT SURE
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I was told by a Yamaha tech that the "break-in" oil is just thinner oil. I can't remember the viscosity or wgt... it was a long time ago.
 

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6th Gear Whore
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the only thing that Yamaha might add into the motor is a lubricant for the first time its started. it takes the place of the motor oil for the fraction of time when the motor is being turned over and parts are spinning. after that, the oil is already all throughout the motor.

200 miles in two months?! i had that the first week... and there was 3 days of rain
 

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Break in oil is one of the great unsolved mysteries of life. Some manufacturers have been very specific about not changing it for the first six hundred miles. But I've never met anyone who could provide a definitive answer about its formulation.

That said, it comes from the factory in the bike. No one at the dealer could really say reliably whether it is or isn't special.
 

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FIZZER6 said:
They don't put anything special in the "break in" oil. I asked a friend about that who used to work at a powersports dealer. It's just the standard manufacturer's recommended oil.

I can't see how changing it can hurt. All that gunk was clogging up the filter, likely causing decreased oil flow and therefor decreased lubrication. I installed a Bosch Premium filter (the one that is 1/2" longer than stock) for increased filtering capacity to pick up more contaminants. I know everyone has their own way of breaking in an engine, I'm sure none are really that much better than others but I'll err on the side of conservative.

Your bike's oil filter has a bypass valve that opens if the filter becomes clogged. So no, there is no reduced oil flow.
 

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silverbullet said:
Hate to hijack your thread, but...

You've got an '06 and you've only done 200 miles. Do less stressin' an more ridin.
I'm sure the "rocket scientists" who've dreamed up our bikes would have taken into account metal shavings and oil and breakin' time and 200 miles or 600 etc., I'd make myself crazy thinking about all the what if's; I'd rather just ride!
 

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dagdowell said:
I'm sure the "rocket scientists" who've dreamed up our bikes would have taken into account metal shavings and oil and breakin' time and 200 miles or 600 etc., I'd make myself crazy thinking about all the what if's; I'd rather just ride!


+1
 

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The Angry Blue Mantis!
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
+2!!! I'm done worring about it...I rode to work today, it was 41 degrees when I left for my 23 mile one way trek. I was warm the whole way! Getting up to 75 this afternoon!

I can say this, the clutch definitely fells smoother and more solid.

I think the main reason that my oil looked so bad after just 200 miles was that I took the advice of my coworker (I former SS bike competition rider) and broke the motor in a little differently than the manual says.

I reved it to 8 and 10K after 50 miles...I would wind up each gear to 8 or 10K and then let off the throttle to decelerate the bike. I was told that you have to get the revs up to properly seat the piston rings...letting off the throttle in the gear and decelerating would help suck oil back up and then repeat. I never even touched 6th gear until 100 miles. I got only 30 mpg on my first tank. I think my 200 mile motor is as broken in as most 500 mile motors would be if you followed the owner's manual. Did I do the right thing? We could debate it all day.

Now I just want to ride! :)
 

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The only way you'll know if you did the right thing is to keep riding. If your motor starts falling apart before anyone elses.....the verdict will be in.
The idea is not to break it in the fastest....you want parts to wear in at proper rate so that they fit together properly. When things are tight, they tend to overheat, hence the reason to keep the revs down to a low level.
Imagine engine breaking in like assfucking your gal for the first time.....nuff said.
 
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