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TowTrucks Suck!!!
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im new to the whole streetbike scene, ive ridden dirtbikes for a long time, and i know they are really nothing like riding a burner. I am really thinking about getting something in the 600 class, maybe a cbr, or gsx-r, im looking to spend around 4 to 5 thousand and i want to finance used from a dealer. Do they require full coverage for that amount financed usually. What year bike do you think i can get for that price, and how much do you think my monthly will be. Reason is right now im working in frazier park which is 50 miles from my house. Im figuring to be spending 400 dollars a month in gas in my truck. If i finance a bike, with liability, it will be much cheaper. What is the estimated gas mileage i will get with a bike like this. Sorry for the run on paragraph, i just though of alot of questions as i was going. Thanks for the help guys
ryan
 

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what's up bitches
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i suggest to go to my thread where it says "insurance.. wtf is wrong with this quote" and go to page 2. read linuxbikr's post. it helped me... im a beginner too
 

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Welcome to SBN

Now go into the new rider forum here at SBN and at least read all the stickies if not more.

A "burner" in the 600cc class is not a good choice for a first street bike.As for as the rest of you"?'s" go,it depends on the bike bought.
 

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Here's the quote he's talking about.





Based on what you're saying, you should not be looking at 600cc class machines. You're young and you're talking about minimum coverage rates. Liability covers what you do to others, NOT YOURSELF! If you t-bone someone in an intersection (the most common bike vs. car incident), your liability covers the damage you do to the other vehicle and people inside. It does nothing to help you. Do you know how far state minimums go? Maybe the ambulance ride and a couple hours in the trauma bay for anyone who might be injured if you fuck up.

I don't care if you like the insurance companies or not. It doesn't matter because if it is mandatory where you live, you have to deal with it. First rule of insurance: get as much as you can afford. If state minimum is all you can afford, fine, but reconsider riding. One accident can destroy you. The next thing is massive under/uninsured motorist coverage. The reason for this is medical. Odds are good if someone hits you, you are going to be hurt far more than the person in the cage. You're in the open without a seat belt or safety cage. If that person has minimum coverage (say $20K) and you have medical bills totalling $60K, guess what pays the difference after their insurance runs out? Under/uninsured. If your under/uninsured is only $20K (has to be at the same level as your other coverage), you get stuck with the remainder of the bills at $20K. Just the fear of that possibility makes me carry massive amounts of insurance. I carry $500K in under/uninsured, comp, collision and theft. Higher than the $300K on my cars for the same coverage but I don't like taking chances.

Insurance rates go down on bikes that are 7 model years or older and ones that don't have spectacular loss histories. Bikes that no one wants are better candidates than an R6 or a Gixxer. With my bike and given a choice of several other machines to choose from, odds are the thieves will steal the others. Who wants an FZR as a thief? No poser or stunta buying a stolen bike would look twice at such a bike. Too lame. Lame works in your favor.

When somone talks about liability only, what they are really saying is they are willing to take the risk of an accident and paying for it themselves. They operate under the assumption that they won't cause the wreck and if they do, they'll be paying for it. For some people, this is an acceptable risk or a risk they have to take in order to drive (for whatever reason: cost, traffic violation history, etc). In a car, this behavior is acceptable albeit risky. On a bike it is foolhardy. You are 21 times more likely to be hurt on a bike than in a car. That's a fact. The risk factor for just riding around is much, much higher on two wheels than on four. Insurance is what you have to make that risk palatable, acceptable and affordable. Unless you can afford to replace the bike wholesale and cover the cost of your own injuries and recovery, don't carry liability only.

You're talking about wanting a bike that's fast. That alone right there tells me you are coming into this with the wrong attitude and perspective. Young and wanting a fast bike is a recipe for self-destruction. And the bike may not matter. But a 600cc machine with that combination can get you killed or hurt badly because 600s are very seductive bikes. The engines are incredibly smooth and the bike responds to every little thing. They lull you into this false sense of security and invulnerability. Then you hit their "sweet spot". That's when the true power kicks in along with the adrenaline. It is very, very, very easy to get in over your head without realizing you are until it is too late. Experienced riders control and actively manage themselves and their machines. New riders get lured in. In single bike accidents, rider ability (more importantly, lack of it) is one of the greatest factors involved next to alcohol (over half of all single bike accidents involve drinking). Almost none are related to mechanical problems with the bike. Riding past your limits as a rider for the conditions at hand is the single largest cause of single bike wrecks where booze is not involved. And when you realize you're in trouble, it is already too late.

Seriously, look at an EX250 or one of the 500s. Your logic is bullshit when it comes to reselling. You can sell an EX250 in good condition in a matter of days (or hours) for what you paid for it. If you have a $4K budget, that $4K has to cover EVERYTHING, not just the bike. No point in spending $4K on a bike if you can't afford another $1000 in gear, $150/month in insurance and any immediate maintenance to make the bike safe for the street. Sorry to say but every used bike requires something. Usually new tires or a tune-up. People don't sink money into bikes they are about to sell. $2K spent on a 250 or 500 and having $2K left to cover everything else including several months of insurance is a much smarter, safer way to go.

As a college student, a single drop or big maintenance item can blow a hole in your budget. Can you afford several hundred dollars to buy a new set of fairings and fix any other damage in case you lay the bike down? Or $300-$400 for the dealer to service something that needs attention 3-6 months away (like a valve adjustment if the bike has miles on it)? Or just the regular oil and filter changes every couple months if you can't do them yourself? 3000 miles goes by fast on two wheels. You can't neglect maintenance on a bike. A car will let you slide and at worst leave you stranded on the side of the road. A neglected bike can kill you.

You have your whole life ahead of you and plenty of time to step up. Trust me, anyone with a bike on campus gets noticed even if you ride a 250. 250s are great college bikes. Cheap, fun and simple. And they are fast. Faster than 95% of the cars out there. It's all about the rider. But if the only way you can be riding to the dorm is on a 600, you have your priorities and ideas mixed up about riding and having a bike for pose factor means you'll likely be selling the bike within a year (due to lack of interest after the novelty wears off and what riding is all about sets in) or you're going to get hurt.
 
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