Sport Bikes banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Calm like a bomb!
Joined
·
7,944 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Service members...ride safe out there guys.

RIP to the fallen riders.

There are a TON of military riders here in SoCal and if squids arent bad enough on their own, I know too many squids who are well...squids.

I know you all have safety briefings about this, but its the season now guys.

Traffic Death Updates -- FY07

July 1 -- A lance corporal from MCB Quantico was killed in a single vehicle accident.

June 24 -- A corporal from 2nd MLG was killed in a head-on collision with a truck. He was speeding and crossed into the oncoming lane of traffic. He wasn’t wearing a DOT-approved helmet.

June 21 -- An HM2 from NSHS San Diego lost control of his motorcycle and was ejected over a ravine near Chula Vista, Calif. He suffered fatal injuries.

June 16 -- In San Diego, a corporal from 1st MARDIV/3D AABN was speeding on his motorcycle with four other riders. He crashed into one of the riders in front of him when that rider slowed down.

June 14 -- An AE2 from FRC Norfolk died from injuries suffered during a head-on collision in Currituck Co., N.C..

June 9 -- A CWO2 from I MGH GPAC died after his bicycle was struck by a small truck.

June 8 -- A staff sergeant from HQSPTBN suffered fatal injuries in a single motorcycle accident.

June 2 -- An AZAN from VX-9 was killed in a head-on collision near Walker Pass, Calif. .

May 27 -- An MA2 from NSA Washington DC was killed when he lost control of his vehicle, hit a guardrail and crashed into a tree in Prince George's Co., Md.

May 26 -- A corporal from MCB Quantico was killed when he lost control of his motorcycle and collided with a guardrail near Stafford, Va.

May 25 -- An E-5 from USS Leyte Gulf was killed a motorcycle wreck near Myrtle Beach, S.C. Also, a lance corporal from 3rd Battalion, 11th Marines, was struck and killed by a car as he ran across a highway near Twentynine Palms, Calif. Mishap occurred at 0043; alcohol involved.

May 24 -- A sergeant lost control of his motorcycle 1500 meters outside a gate to a base in Albany, Ga. He was ejected, broke his neck and slid under a stopped van. He died from his injuries on May 29.

May 21 -- An AM2 from HSC-3 was killed in a motorcycle accident. He had been racing another motorcycle and was traveling an estimated 72 mph in a 45 mph zone before losing control in a curve.

There should be some mention of the HSC-21 Sailor that died but it's not here.

May 20 -- A Master Chief from NETC/HPC was killed in a motorcycle crash in Chesapeake, VA. While riding northbound on Centerville Turnpike, a pick-up truck unexpectedly turned in front of him. He was unable to avoid the collision with the pick-up.

May 17 -- A seaman from the School of Music at NAB Little Creek was killed when the car in which she was riding went out of control and crashed into a tree. Mishap occurred at 0155. The driver was in the military and has been charged with DUI.

May 13 -- An E-1 from USS Kittyhawk was en route home when he was killed in a single motorcycle accident in Yokosuka, Japan.

May 12-- An E-3 from HS-3 was thrown from a vehicle while riding with his girlfriend in Jacksonville; he suffered fatal injuries. Also, an E-4 from ACU-4 was fatally injured in a motorcycle accident in Norfolk.

May 11 -- A staff sergeant from Marine Special Ops School was fatally injured when a van pulled out in front of his motorcycle in Myrtle Beach, S.C. Also, a sergeant from 1st BN, 4th MAR, lost control of his motorcycle, crossed into oncoming traffic and was instantly killed in a collision with a truck in Bonsall, Calif.

May 6 -- An MA2 from Naval Base Coronado was killed in a traffic wreck near El Cajon, Calif. He had been speeding and was ejected.

May 2 -- A lance corporal and a corporal (one at the wheel, the other a passenger) from 1st MARDIV, 7th Marines, died in a wreck near Perris, Calif. The driver lost control and crashed into a tree.

April 29 -- A YN3 from Patrol Squadron 10 was killed in a car wreck. The driver lost control after hitting an object in the road. The vehicle rolled. The YN3 was a passenger in the back.

April 21 -- A lance corporal from 1st Battalion, 9th Marines was killed in a wreck near Richlands, N.C. at 0030. He was going 80 mph in a 45 mph zone, lost control and was ejected. He wasn’t wearing a seatbelt and had been drinking. Also, a private from HQ Co., 8th Marine Regiment, was injured in a motorcycle wreck near Charleston, S.C. He lost control while passing a car on an on-ramp and veered into oncoming traffic. He died from his injuries on April 23.

April 14-- At 0203, an E-4 from VP-45 was killed in a single-vehicle mishap in Jacksonville, Fla.

April 9 -- An E-4 from USS Halsey suffered fatal injuries in a motorcycle wreck. He collided with two cars near La Mesa, Calif..

March 24 -- At 0326, a 2nd LT assigned to 3rd BN 1st Marines was killed when he ran into a tow truck on a state highway.

March 13 -- An AD2 assigned to the Navy Operations Support Center Atlanta suffered fatal injuries when he collided with another vehicle while riding his motorcycle to work.

March 11 -- At 0529, a lieutenant from Naval Hospital, Guam lost control on his car on an access road to his condominium. He was pronounced dead at a hospital.

March 10 -- A lieutenant wrecked his motorcycle near Emporia, Va. He was on his way from buying the motorcycle. He died later at a hospital.

February 26 -- At 0130, a Marine private died in a car wreck on an interstate highway in Michigan. He was driving a van when he lost control; the van flipped several times. He had graduated from basic training last Friday. Also, a QMC from Naval Base Kitsap was killed in a wreck near Discovery Bay, Wash. He crossed the centerline and collided head-on with another car.

February 24 -- A lance corporal from 1st MARDIV/5TH Marines was killed when the driver of the car in which he was a passenger fell asleep and crashed into a tree.

February 23 -- A sergeant and a staff sergeant, along with three other Marine recruiters, were driving a government motor vehicle to an awards banquet in New Jersey. The vehicle crossed over into the oncoming lane, ran off the road and struck a tree. The staff sergeant was killed at the scene. The sergeant died the following day in a hospital. Seatbelts were not worn.

February 19 -- At 1920, a chief hospital corpsman assigned to Naval Hospital, Camp Lejeune, was killed in Jacksonville, N.C., when another vehicle crossed the center lane and collided with his vehicle.

February 19 -- At 0001, a Marine private first class on post-boot camp leave was killed in a car crash on a two-lane road in Sante Fe County, New Mexico. The Marine was a backseat passenger at the time. He was wearing a seat belt but died when the vehicle rolled over.

February 16 -- A Marine corporal assigned to MCCES K9R died about two minutes after being taken off life support. The corporal had been hospitalized since a Feb. 4 crash, in which he was a passenger in another Marine's vehicle. The crash occurred in Barstow, Calif.

January 30 -- A sergeant from CLR-17/1ST MLG was killed when he lost control of his vehicle, struck a divider and collided with another car on an interstate in San Diego.

January 29 – At 0530, an AW2 from HSMWINGLANT/Surface Rescue Swimmer School was killed in a motorcycle wreck near Jacksonville Fla. He was reportedly traveling at 100 mph and lost control in a turn.

January 21 -- A staff sergeant from MACG48/MASS was riding with a group of motorcyclists near Miramar, Calif. He lost control in a turn, struck a guard rail and was killed when he was hit by the motorcyclist following him. I got the dis-pleasure of seeing the aftermath of this.

January 20 -- An FC1 from USS Mount Whitney lost control of his car and ran into a wall; he suffered fatal injuries.

January 13 -- An AO3 from HS-7 was killed in a motorcycle wreck on an interstate near Jacksonville, Fla. He was apparently speeding.

January 8 -- An HM2 from the Naval Survival Training Institute suffered fatal injuries in a motorcycle wreck in Pensacola, Fla. He was speeding and crashed into the back of an SUV.

January 7 -- An MM1 from the Navy submarine school in New London, Ct., was a back seat passenger on an interstate near Hopkinton, R.I. The car he was riding in was run off the road by an tractor-trailer. He was ejected and suffered fatal injuries.

January 1 -- Just after midnight, a corporal from VMFA-212 was struck and killed by a car in Belle Chase, La.

December 29 -- At 1300, an E-3 from USS Bonhomme Richard was killed in a single-vehicle crash in Hudspeth County, Tex. The vehicle rolled over and ejected him.

December 26 -- A Marine private attached to CNATT Unit Lemoore lost control of his motorcycle in Crosby, Texas, and suffered fatal injuries.

December 25 -- At 0450, a PFC from 2NDBN, 1STMAR, suffered fatal injuries after losing control of his car in Las Vegas. He ran off the road and hit a cement barrier and several trees. His vehicle traveled 336 feet before coming to rest. No seatbelt.

December 24 -- An RP3 from NATNAVMEDCEN Bethesda died from injuries in a motorcycle accident near Rocky Mount, N.C.

December 23 -- A master sergeant from USS Oak Hill died from injuries suffered in a traffic accident on December 22 in Springfield, Colo. Also, a corporal from HMM-268 died in a wreck in Saranac Lake, N.Y. He was a front-seat passenger when the driver lost control and hit a tree at 0030.

December 18 -- In Lexington, N.C., a corporal assigned to the HQBN 3RD MARDIV was driving to the store in heavy fog at 0104. He crossed the centerline of a roadway and was killed in a head-on crash with an oncoming vehicle.

December 17 -- An E-4 from USS Ronald Reagan was killed when he lost control of his vehicle and crashed into the center divider on a highway in San Diego.

December 16 -- A PFC from H & S CO, Marine Corps Security Force Battalion, was riding his motorcycle when he was struck and killed by an SUV in Norfolk. Also, a sergeant from 2nd MAINT BN, 2nd MLG, lost control of his vehicle. He wasn't wearing a seatbelt and suffered fatal injuries when the vehicle rolled and ejected him.

December 13 -- A private assigned to a Marine Corps school in California was struck and killed by a bus while on leave in North Carolina.

December 10 -- An HM1 from Recruit Training Command was killed in a single vehicle mishap.

December 8 -- A senior chief from VFA-115 was killed in a head-on motor vehicle mishap.

November 30 -- At 0130, a staff sergeant from the School of Infantry West slammed into the rear of a tractor-trailer near San Diego. Fatal injuries.

November 26 -- A lance corporal from 1ST BN, 2DMAR, 2D MARDIV was driving when his car was rear-ended in Jacksonville, N.C. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

November 24-- A Marine who had graduated from recruit training two days earlier died in a wreck in Monroe County, Pa. He had been driving when he lost control and hit a tree. He was ejected and pinned beneath the car.

November 24 -- A midshipman was killed in a car wreck at 0130 in Annapolis, Md. He was a passenger in the front seat of a car driven by a civilian who crashed into a tree.

November 23 -- A corporal from 2ND BN, 5th MAR, 1st MARDIV died when his vehicle was struck by a drunk driver.

November 22 -- A corporal from II MEF was speeding on a highway near Richlands, N.C. She lost control, crossed into the southbound lane and was hit by a truck and a tractor-trailer. In spite of her seatbelt, she suffered injuries that proved fatal on November 25.

November 9 -- A corporal from 4th MARDIV, 4th RECON BN, suffered fatal injuries as a passenger in a speeding vehicle driven by a lance corporal who ran into the back of a tractor-trailer. Also, a sergeant from MARCENT HQ was killed in a motorcycle wreck in Northdale, Fla. He lost control in a curve.

November 5 -- At approximately 1315, a lieutenant lost control of his motorcycle in Washington state and was ejected into the path of a car that hit him. He suffered fatal injuries.

November 4 -- At around 0430, a lance corporal from II MHG, II MEF, died in a wreck as a passenger in a car belonging to a fellow corporal. The driver was speeding and hit a telephone pole in North Carolina. The car went airborne for 60 feet and bounced another 40 feet. Alcohol suspected. Also, an AOAN from VFA-147 lost control of his motorcycle while doing wheelies in a neighborhood. Fatal injuries.

October 30 -- A seaman recruit from USS George Washington suffers serious injuries in a wreck on October 30. The injuries proved fatal on November 20. He was a passenger in a car driven by a fellow SR who had fallen asleep at the wheel and crashed into a tree in on an interstate highway in Chesapeake, Va.

October 27 -- At 0130, a PFC from 2D Battalion, 6th Marines, 2D MARDIV suffered fatal injuries when the car he was driving veered across three lanes of traffic, struck a traffic barrier, and then veered back across the traffic. Two passengers had minor injuries. The mishap was in Nashua, N.H.

October 16 -- An E-3 from USS Harry S. Truman was killed in a wreck in York County, Va. He was on his way to work when he lost control and ran into a tree.

October 9 -- In Norfolk, an E-4 and an E-3, both 19 years old and from USS Harry S. Truman, died when their car crossed an interstate median and was broadsided by another vehicle.

October 7 -- A lance corporal from HQ BN, 1ST MARDIV, was killed when a drunk driver ran a stoplight and collided with his car in Los Angeles. The Marine’s wife was also killed.

October 7 -- At around 0230, an MA3 from Mobile Security Squadron Three suffered fatal injuries while driving a rented car in Bahrain. He collided with a light pole. His passenger, an E-2, was seriously injured.

DoN PMV Deaths FY07 to date: 79 (80 if you include the one fatality we know of that is not listed here)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
I see one that wasnt in there. It may have been FY06, though. I do sadly see one in there that happened not too long ago...Also, is there any way I could get the name of the HM1 from great lakes in a single vech. mishap Dec 10?
 

·
You got that right.
Joined
·
10,228 Posts
RIP.

I was doing a research project on rider fatalities. And one of the sources did a great piece on military rider deaths. There's a lot of young servicemen that are seemingly coming home from service and picking up the biggest and baddest machines with little or no rider training. Part of the issue (according to the article's author) is the untaxed income while serving (surplus of income), a mode to release stress (from combat, post-traumatic stress, etc.) and the bravado associated with teenagers and young men in their early twenties.
 

·
Calm like a bomb!
Joined
·
7,944 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
mikem317 said:
RIP.

I was doing a research project on rider fatalities. And one of the sources did a great piece on military rider deaths. There's a lot of young servicemen that are seemingly coming home from service and picking up the biggest and baddest machines with little or no rider training. Part of the issue (according to the article's author) is the untaxed income while serving (surplus of income), a mode to release stress (from combat, post-traumatic stress, etc.) and the bravado associated with teenagers and young men in their early twenties.
Exactly Mike...exactly.

I have several buddies who teach on base here in SD and try to talk to the guys.

My Grandfather does some Christian ministry work on Miramar and MCRD and I tell him to refer any Marine to me who is a new rider or thinking about getting into it.
 

·
Calm like a bomb!
Joined
·
7,944 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
ChrisP said:
I see one that wasnt in there. It may have been FY06, though. I do sadly see one in there that happened not too long ago...Also, is there any way I could get the name of the HM1 from great lakes in a single vech. mishap Dec 10?
Not sure of the name...

Check here http://www.safetycenter.navy.mil/
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,613 Posts
That list is way too big.

My unit had a lot of people go to MP positions after 9-11. Almost all of the incidents that happened at night involved drinking. It's something the military tries to keep under wraps. To all the guys serving now, keep in mind that NOT driving is the responsible thing to do when drinking. Think of your family, friends, career, your life and any innocent people that might get hurt.

Guys serving...take care of yourselves.
 

·
You got that right.
Joined
·
10,228 Posts
Iceman_954rr said:
Exactly Mike...exactly.

I have several buddies who teach on base here in SD and try to talk to the guys.

My Grandfather does some Christian ministry work on Miramar and MCRD and I tell him to refer any Marine to me who is a new rider or thinking about getting into it.
Or more work and communication between the military and MSF. Or something. It's pretty needless. These men and women serve our country proudly, protecting or freedoms and then come home and end up with a toe tag becoming another statistic. Good idea to promote some awareness!
 

·
No more disassemble!
Joined
·
381 Posts
I have been in the Navy for 5 years (I am a Second Class) and they make it VERY hard to take the base MSF course. The waiting list is long, and you have to get your command to approve. It takes a long time since the Navy treats enlisted people like crap. Most guys just buy bikes and don't take the course, since you can't ride on base until you take the course they just ride off base and when they wreck or the navy finds out they BURN these guys bad, knocking them down a rank and taking there money. They now make everyone at Naval Base Ventura County sign a 'page 13' that states the navy will not pay for your medical bill if you are hurt on a motorcycle and are found to be reckless and/or without the MSF course. Its not the Navy's fault that squids are squids, but they are not dong enough to get riders and prospective riders educated!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
This is always a sore topic with me. In my last command we NEVER had a motorcycle meeting, ride, brief or what have you. No one gave a shit about the riders. We had a motorcycle president (high ranking enlisted) but he never did shit.
Fast forward to this command, we go by the fucking book. New riders automatically signed up for the MSF. Quarterly rides and meetings the whole nine. All riders in a database with all info (how long they have ridden, MC liscense #) Funny thing is, it doesnt seem to make a difference. The couldcareless command we had a WO break his arm and a couple others go down and the "I went fast" story.
The bythebook command we had new riders go down, new rider on R1 bragging about doing 170 down the I-8. Rider ticketed for doing 125 in a 65. Iceman, you know Miramar Rd....idiots in MILSPEC vests doing wheelies up and down it.
Point being once you turn us loose we pretty much don't give a shit. Other than an outright ban or a loss of rank for even the smallest shit (wheelie ticket, 5 mph over, go down riding beyond your limits), we won't change our ways.
Me personally I only push it on Palomar because I don't want to deal with the bullshit. If I wreck on Palomar it's "good thing you are OK." If I get a wheelie ticket I get talked to like a child by 3 different people for about an hour.
If the military had a set in stone system like you get busted for ANYTHING it might work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,557 Posts
Hye SeabeeBob,

I have a little bit of a hard time believeing that your command makes it difficult to take the Safety Course. However, if that is true, there is a simple way to solve that problem. The next time you have a Safety Standdown, when the Admiral asks if there are any questions, stand up and say, "Sir, we are having a very hard time getting slots for the motorcycle safety course. In fact, in our view, the command deliberately make sit difficult for sailors to get the motorcycle training. Is there anything you can do to help us?" Then sit down and watch the sparks fly. Next thing you know, you will have motorcycle training coming out your ears, guaranteed. Of course, if you are full of shit, the CO is gonna break it off in your ass, so there is a little bit of risk there.

If that plan is a little salty for you, look around your spaces and find the anonymous safety suggestion box. Those chits actually get reviewed fairly high up the chain of command. Or, you can get on the web and contact the Naval Safety Center. Again, any suggestion that "our command deliberately makes it hard for us to get the training," is gonna create a lot of excitement.
 

·
Calm like a bomb!
Joined
·
7,944 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
FookEmAll said:
This is always a sore topic with me. In my last command we NEVER had a motorcycle meeting, ride, brief or what have you. No one gave a shit about the riders. We had a motorcycle president (high ranking enlisted) but he never did shit.
Fast forward to this command, we go by the fucking book. New riders automatically signed up for the MSF. Quarterly rides and meetings the whole nine. All riders in a database with all info (how long they have ridden, MC liscense #) Funny thing is, it doesnt seem to make a difference. The couldcareless command we had a WO break his arm and a couple others go down and the "I went fast" story.
The bythebook command we had new riders go down, new rider on R1 bragging about doing 170 down the I-8. Rider ticketed for doing 125 in a 65. Iceman, you know Miramar Rd....idiots in MILSPEC vests doing wheelies up and down it.
Point being once you turn us loose we pretty much don't give a shit. Other than an outright ban or a loss of rank for even the smallest shit (wheelie ticket, 5 mph over, go down riding beyond your limits), we won't change our ways.
Me personally I only push it on Palomar because I don't want to deal with the bullshit. If I wreck on Palomar it's "good thing you are OK." If I get a wheelie ticket I get talked to like a child by 3 different people for about an hour.
If the military had a set in stone system like you get busted for ANYTHING it might work.
Yup...I've seen several "incidents" on Miramar rd. It's hard for me to really make an impact sometimes because I'm a civilian and they are Marines, but I tried to impress on the couple guys that I talked to that being a Marine doesnt automatically provide you with the nessesary skills to ride. I'm no pro and I'm not that fast, but I'm alive and my bike is in one piece. I guess that gives me some kind of credit.

Joe...do your best to talk to your buddies man. Dont be shy. :cheers
 

·
No more disassemble!
Joined
·
381 Posts
Jim Moore said:
Hye SeabeeBob,

I have a little bit of a hard time believeing that your command makes it difficult to take the Safety Course. However, if that is true, there is a simple way to solve that problem. The next time you have a Safety Standdown, when the Admiral asks if there are any questions, stand up and say, "Sir, we are having a very hard time getting slots for the motorcycle safety course. In fact, in our view, the command deliberately make sit difficult for sailors to get the motorcycle training. Is there anything you can do to help us?" Then sit down and watch the sparks fly. Next thing you know, you will have motorcycle training coming out your ears, guaranteed. Of course, if you are full of shit, the CO is gonna break it off in your ass, so there is a little bit of risk there.

If that plan is a little salty for you, look around your spaces and find the anonymous safety suggestion box. Those chits actually get reviewed fairly high up the chain of command. Or, you can get on the web and contact the Naval Safety Center. Again, any suggestion that "our command deliberately makes it hard for us to get the training," is gonna create a lot of excitement.
WELL I DON'T FIND IT HARD TO BELIEVE THAT MY COMMAND (A WEST COAST SEABEE BATTALION) MAKES IT HARD TO TAKE THE BASE SAFETY COURSE. If someone said something like that at a safety stand down here in my Battalion the skipper would say something like "I will look into it" or "Write that down Master Chief" and then after the stand down there would be 5 Chiefs there to chew your ass for saying something so stupid and tell you that you should have asked your squad leader. The Seabees deliberately make things difficult for us, its just the way it is. Taking anything to a higher level is considered jumping the chain of command and you will be punished for it. The best thing to do is to take the course 'out in town'. I don't know if you are in the military but you don't sound like an E-5 or below, you sound like an officer or senior enlisted. Its the Junior Enlisted people who are buying the bikes without proper education and getting hurt or killing themselves. The Navy is not doing enough to educate riders or prospective riders.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,618 Posts
seabeebob84 said:
I have been in the Navy for 5 years (I am a Second Class) and they make it VERY hard to take the base MSF course. The waiting list is long, and you have to get your command to approve. It takes a long time since the Navy treats enlisted people like crap. Most guys just buy bikes and don't take the course, since you can't ride on base until you take the course they just ride off base and when they wreck or the navy finds out they BURN these guys bad, knocking them down a rank and taking there money. They now make everyone at Naval Base Ventura County sign a 'page 13' that states the navy will not pay for your medical bill if you are hurt on a motorcycle and are found to be reckless and/or without the MSF course. Its not the Navy's fault that squids are squids, but they are not dong enough to get riders and prospective riders educated!

OPNAVINST 5100.12G
ENCLOSURE 1
SECTION 2, PARAGRAPH A, SUBSECTION 2

motorcycle training is mandatory for active duty who ride and dod personnel who ride on base. if your command is not approving your request, they are in the wrong. contact the navy safety center's motor-vehicle division at (757) 444-3520, Ext. 7602, for guidance on what you should do.

or call the local military msf class instructors (on imperial beach base) for guidance ... 619.532.1233
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,557 Posts
coronadozx said:
if your command is not approving your request, they are in the wrong. contact the navy safety center's motor-vehicle division at (757) 444-3520, Ext. 7602, for guidance on what you should do.
Do it. Do it anonymously.
 

·
No more disassemble!
Joined
·
381 Posts
OK some clarification, They are not Denying anyone, they just take a long time to approve you or lose your request and then you are on the waiting list for the course, its a problem throughout the NBVC battalions. They need a larger program. My whole point is that the navy could do MORE. Look at all the accidents! They need to do something. They now make it mandatory for everyone to take Navy Knowledge Online driving courses, Maybe an online riders course in addition to the MSF course could help. I am overseas now so maybe they have improved since I have been gone, but I doubt it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
I dont doubt it at all. Im on my way out the military as an E-5. The military atleats every command ive been at in the last 4 or so years is mostly made of stupid ppl. So they make rules to control large groups of stupid ppl. I know ppl are going to get pissed but its the truth, look at your liberty policies. Or go overseas and sea how many drunks we have to drag in after they piss and throw up on themselves, its embarrassing. They make rules that say you cant ride unless you do this course. The course (like all quals) is usually a gundeck that you show up for shoot the shit, then your done. So to control the number of ppl that take the course they limit the number of times its given or give head of the line to khakis. If everybody has the course, then everybody will ride and accidents will increase. Thus making the command look bad. Everything you do in the military other than showing up to work involves you routing a chit up your command. Thats about 10-12 asses you have to kiss, and 10-12 ppl thinking of some of the dumbest reasons to say no. Even taking a day off work. In their mind they are thinking thats time away from the command that you can get in trouble. But thats time that you earned, you shouldnt have to kiss ass to get it. If you have a strong E-7, life is good. But most are scared to help out their ppl. They just go along with the way things have been done or cosign whatever the next person says so basicly they are useless... jusmyo

also i dont think the course would help that much, if you know you are a weak rider slow the hell down and pay attention more. Most of the accidents are beacsue the rider lost control or wnet into head on traffic, thats prolly cuzz they were trying to see how long they could keep the front tire off the ground. If common fukking sense doesnt tell you, you are about to die, then no gundecked course is either...
 

·
No more disassemble!
Joined
·
381 Posts
BusaNoob said:
I dont doubt it at all. Im on my way out the military as an E-5. The military atleats every command ive been at in the last 4 or so years is mostly made of stupid ppl. So they make rules to control large groups of stupid ppl. I know ppl are going to get pissed but its the truth, look at your liberty policies. Or go overseas and sea how many drunks we have to drag in after they piss and throw up on themselves, its embarrassing. They make rules that say you cant ride unless you do this course. The course (like all quals) is usually a gundeck that you show up for shoot the shit, then your done. So to control the number of ppl that take the course they limit the number of times its given or give head of the line to khakis. If everybody has the course, then everybody will ride and accidents will increase. Thus making the command look bad. Everything you do in the military other than showing up to work involves you routing a chit up your command. Thats about 10-12 asses you have to kiss, and 10-12 ppl thinking of some of the dumbest reasons to say no. Even taking a day off work. In their mind they are thinking thats time away from the command that you can get in trouble. But thats time that you earned, you shouldnt have to kiss ass to get it. If you have a strong E-7, life is good. But most are scared to help out their ppl. They just go along with the way things have been done or cosign whatever the next person says so basicly they are useless... jusmyo

also i dont think the course would help that much, if you know you are a weak rider slow the hell down and pay attention more. Most of the accidents are beacsue the rider lost control or wnet into head on traffic, thats prolly cuzz they were trying to see how long they could keep the front tire off the ground. If common fukking sense doesnt tell you, you are about to die, then no gundecked course is either...
It's scary how well you described the military.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top