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Well, tonight felt like a good night to submit my first post, so here she is! Wanted to say this site is excellent, full of great info and lots of knowledgable folks who seem to know their stuff, of course had to do a little weeding to find 'em. I'm making the leap this week and buying my first bike.

Now, before I tell you what it is, please understand that I wasn't as researched as I should have been before I bought her. I've been reading a lot of recomendations on good starter bikes, and learned a little too late that I might have been better off starting with something a little more timid, but the deal is done so if you have any comments, please offer me some helpful advice. It's a 1990 cbr 600f. Not the meanest bike on the streets, not that that was my intention, but I take it some feel it might still be too much for a beginner. I'll tell you straight up, if I feel overly uneasy about riding her, i'll be quick to sell her and get a 500 or 250 even. I honestly thought, in my lack of research, that it was a good starter. But, do to the great deal I got on it, I shouldn't have any problems getting my money back if need be.

So, let this be your opportunity to help out a noob with any constructive advice you have to offer. Trust me on this, I'm willing to hear all sides. Safety is #1 for me. I'm excited, but I think a little more nervous than anything. I'm sure that will pass somewhat, but for now I welcome it cause I feel it will keep me attentive and alert as I put on my first few miles. I'm taking the msf asap, and will practice in the parking lot until I pass class. I will get a lid and armored jacket with the deal, but will be buying a new helmet as soon as money permits.

Well, that's about it, so feel free to offer up some advice. Think like this, "if I was back to my first days of riding, what advice could I have really used or would like to have heard". Thanks, guys and gals! Oh, i'll get a pic up to. She's not the prettiest lady on the streets, but she's sexy in my eyes! Sorry for the crappy phone
 

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You should be fine with the CBR. I started out on a 91 f2. Yes I had a couple problems with turning, but that was just because I was to scared to trust the bike. I then bought a beat up 250 that I couldn't even ride on the street. After a few weeks in my friends drive way and parkings lots I got the hang of turning. It has been fine since then. I have put over 4k on the f2 in 8 months.

Take it easy and don't push yourself and you will be fine. Spend the next few weeks in a parking lot before you take to the road.
 

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Ok.. safety tips..
1) Take the MSF Class
2) Practice everything you learned in the MSF class in an empty parking lot
3) Buy gear

Take it easy.. don't put yourself in bad situations (don't go in heavy traffic, avoid the highways for 3-4 months, avoid busy intersections and streets for awhile..)

Nice looking bike! Have fun!
 

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Outside of things that you'll learn on the MSF anyway, here are some things which I repeatedly ran through my head when learning:

1. Know, understand, and practice countersteering. Make sure it's instinct for that emergency where you don't have time to think about it.

2. Look where you want to go. This is incredibly important. It's amazing how many times this can get you out of trouble when going wide in a turn starting out. Look through the turn and your bike will go there. Look at the shoulder that you're trying to avoid, and your bike will go there too....

3. Trust your tires. I don't mean to lean the thing so far over you're dragging parts, but in most cases for newbies, you're not actually leaned over as far as you think. Trust the bike that it will stick. You most likely still have a lot further you can lean (even though it probably won't feel like it when you're panicking).

4. Expect everyone to try to kill you. Be aware, and drive defensively.
 

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decius said:
3. Trust your tires. I don't mean to lean the thing so far over you're dragging parts, but in most cases for newbies, you're not actually leaned over as far as you think. Trust the bike that it will stick. You most likely still have a lot further you can lean (even though it probably won't feel like it when you're panicking).
Good advice. The way I look at it is, while a lowside isn't going to be fun it's going to be better than running wide into the other lane where I might be involved in a head-on or across the other lane where I might be involved with a guard rail or tree... When in doubt, look through the turn and lean further.

Oh, and DO NOT try to brake while cornering hard. Even light braking will make the bike want to stand up.
 

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punkincandie said:
You should be fine with the CBR. I started out on a 91 f2. Yes I had a couple problems with turning, but that was just because I was to scared to trust the bike. I then bought a beat up 250 that I couldn't even ride on the street. After a few weeks in my friends drive way and parkings lots I got the hang of turning. It has been fine since then. I have put over 4k on the f2 in 8 months.

Take it easy and don't push yourself and you will be fine. Spend the next few weeks in a parking lot before you take to the road.

COOL ZX7!!! :cheers
 

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Having a fear for your bike is healthy. It keeps your mind on the things they need to be on like keeping you alive. As you practice that fear for the bike will turn into respect for the bike. But as far as your choice on the bike I think you will be fine. While that bike is no moped its still not close to the newer 600s that are being produced today. Enjoy the ride and be safe.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
decius said:
Outside of things that you'll learn on the MSF anyway, here are some things which I repeatedly ran through my head when learning:

1. Know, understand, and practice countersteering. Make sure it's instinct for that emergency where you don't have time to think about it.

2. Look where you want to go. This is incredibly important. It's amazing how many times this can get you out of trouble when going wide in a turn starting out. Look through the turn and your bike will go there. Look at the shoulder that you're trying to avoid, and your bike will go there too....

3. Trust your tires. I don't mean to lean the thing so far over you're dragging parts, but in most cases for newbies, you're not actually leaned over as far as you think. Trust the bike that it will stick. You most likely still have a lot further you can lean (even though it probably won't feel like it when you're panicking).

4. Expect everyone to try to kill you. Be aware, and drive defensively.
Thanks for the replys guys! I'm trying to take as much in as possible before I jump on her for the first time. It's getting dropped off Friday, and I'm just a littleexcited.

Decius, you brought up a coulple things that I've really been thniking about. For one, the leaning. I've always been amazed at the angle I've seen bikes ride. It's like it's breaking some laws of physics. Can't wait to feel it for my self!

And looking where you want to go. I understand the concept, and I've even been trying to practice while driving. I know it's not the same in a car, but it's crazy how hard it is to look through a curve, and not directly in front. My eyes just pop back in front of the car when I'm trying to look around a curve.

The counter steering makes sense, too. I am thinking it is important, because when you turn your wheel into the turn, your actually slowing down the front of the bike causing the rear to continue in a streight line, bringing it up and eventually over I assume. Eh, i'll get it figured out soon enough, crazy though how anxious I'm getting waiting for the first ride. I feel like I'm 9 again dreaming about all the GI joe's I got waiting for me under the christmas tree. :lol
 

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It's important to have counter steering as instinct for lots of different scenarios.

1. You're driving along and all of a sudden there's something in the road right in front of you. Could be a pothole, oil spot, something that just fell out of the truck in front of you, etc... Anyway, you need to avoid it right away. It needs to be instinct to push the right bar to go right, and left to go left (steering away from the direction you want to go).

2. You're leaned in a turn. Nothing major just a casual turn in the road. All of a sudden you realize you're going a little wide, or the car next to you is too close. If you steer it "normally" (turn bars left to go left, turn bars right to go right), it will make you hit whatever you were trying to avoid. If you push the bars opposite to the direction you want to go (COUNTER steering), you'll lean over further, make the turn tighter, and get out of trouble.

Lots of scenarios to list, but they're the first two that came to mind, because they were my first two instances of needing to use it quickly :)

I know how you feel about being excited. I was the same way when I first got mine. Once you get it, you won't want to get off!! My biggest problem these days is listening to my girlfriend complain that I'm spending more time with my bike than with her.... :)

Best of luck dude. Let us know how it goes.
 

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Like decius I go through the same thing with the GF. It seems to work itself out though. As far as riding, keep in your mind that everyone and everything is out to get you. Drive safely. The class is a good way to turn what you need to know, practice, practice,practice!! Keep good tires on your bike as well as brakes and protective gear. You will know what your driving limits are and don't exceed them and the more you ride the more you realize your weaknesses and the bike's. Don't over doing it by trying to keep up with your friends, they can wait!! Good luck with the bike bro and enjoy it!!
 

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If you are going to remember one piece of advice from this thread, remember to LOOK WHERE YOU WANT THE BIKE TO GO. Target fixation is a mugga-fooker. As already stated, look though turns. If you look at the curb, your bike will head that way. If you look at the ground, your bike will end up in its most stable position; on its side.

I was a little aprehensive when I started riding again. After the MSF and many jaunts around town in low traffic, I am getting more confident every ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks again for the help, guys! I'm taking in as much as I can, and hope I can remember as much as possible when I go out.

Looking through a curve is still a little confusing. Say your on a flat, unobstructed road, and there is a lazy curve coming up. About how far up the road would you want to look. Do you try to see the point when the road straightens again and keep your eyes on that? And, if it's a blind curve, do you look through the obstructions as if you knew what was coming up, or just as far up the road as you can see before it's obstructed?

Eh, i'm sure it will make sense when I get on and ride. Man, I'll have the bike tomorrow afternoon and I can hardly wait :banana . I'll let you guys know how sweet them parking lots are, in case you forgot!! :lol
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Bomb300 said:
If you are going to remember one piece of advice from this thread, remember to LOOK WHERE YOU WANT THE BIKE TO GO. Target fixation is a mugga-fooker. As already stated, look though turns. If you look at the curb, your bike will head that way. If you look at the ground, your bike will end up in its most stable position; on its side.

I was a little aprehensive when I started riding again. After the MSF and many jaunts around town in low traffic, I am getting more confident every ride.
Thanks for the advice, bomb. So, you use to ride? What happened if you don't mind me asking. If you did lay it down, I kinda understand what your dealing with, in a way. I had to watch my brother get put back together when I was 9 after he nearly lost his life on a bike. No helment, t-boned a car doing about 60. He really should be dead, and did come close. Anyways, that is a fear that I'm trying to overcome. I have always wanted a bike, but after his wreck I attempted to talk myself out of it. I guess I never totally did, now I feel I gotta get on a bike to prove that, I don't know, I guess that bikes don't kill people. That's the lesson I got out of my brothers wreck from my parents, that bikes are killers, and I know it's not true.


Anyways, thanks again for the tip!

~chris
 

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KH, Rest In Peace Brother
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I can understand high, I put one down at 85mph in a hard turn, got the bike home and switched to racing ATVs, then I got the bug again and bit the dog that bit me. I still ride hard but as crazy as I used to.

As far as looking through the curve, what I do is if it is a lazy turn I pick a spot in the center of the turn & road and drive towards it, as I get closer I move my point further through the curve just keep an eye for hidden driveways and crap in the middle of curves.
 
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