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still learning to ride...
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
so i crashed pretty good at BHF sat morning. 1st 2 sessions of the morning were going really well. the 1st session i was working with ron hix, and after wards he gave me some good pointers on how to improve in a few areas...

next session i was working on what ron told me to and i ended up runnin the whole sessoin with erik(burrito). afterwards he said i was riding really well and that the next session i would work with ron again and get evaluated for the bump to "A".

so im out with ron, and as i was out running with him, i felt i was riding the best i have ever ridden. i didnt have the lap timer on, cuz i wasnt going for lap times, last track day Brian blume told me to leave the lap timer off, just try and relax and hit the apex. so i was out running with ron feeling good hitting all the apex's the best i could. about 10min into the session i was going thru T5, and thinking to myself..... dang, i got some lean angle going here, my body position was feeling good, i hit the apex(or so i thought....) and as i was thinking that, i felt the rear start sliding out on me. nothing i could do to save it, so i let it go. rear went followed by the front and the bike slid off track followed by me. The bike slid into the grass and jumped into the air and flipped, of course with pieces flying off it.

i stop moving make sure eveything on me is okay. im fine, i give the thumbs up and go to check out the bike. bike is fucked. im done for the day.

i get back to our pit and start trying to figure out what went wrong. start talking to mattg and trying to figure it out. all i could remember was the rear going but i couldnt figure out why....
during lunch i find ron and try and find out where i went wrong... he says i turned in too early and got on the gas to early. so i when i thought i was at the apex, i wasnt, which sux.

ron said i woulda got the bump, if i finished the session. which also bumm's me out, but its also shows me mayb im not ready to run "A". and i still have alot to learn.

so im 2 for 4 at BHF. both times i have "totaled" a bike. the gsxr will become my track bike next year, but im done riding for the year, it gives me time to fix the gsxr up. i need a stay, race body and muffler, and it should be set to go.

what i got out of all of this was that mayb i should count my blessings and give it a rest for awhile, ive been lucky enuff to walk away from two pretty good crashes. and part of me would like to keep it that way. but this is a sport and hobby i love and that crashing is unfortuanlty part of the deal.
 

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Dane,

I was bummed to hear you were in the weeds and see your bike come back on the truck. It was cool hearing you talk about how good you felt on Saturday.

Part of this whole learning experience has to do with realizing when you have to back off a few notches to work on a skill, hit your marks, or just dealing with a pucker moment.

My martial arts instructor still says this (and it's not at all directed at you or your riding). "Poor technique done quickly, is still poor technique." I use that to remind myself to be a better, smoother, more accurate and consistent rider every time I go out. Speed is a by-product of those things. Speed without those things is simply using your balls.

It's good that you know what happened. Do you understand why it was (several) mistakes? I did something similar once on a good friends bike and almost got a ride to the moon. Trying to turn too tight, too fast, which means a lot of lean and then adding gas. The rear stepped out and I was really lucky that it got back in line before launching me Lorenzo style. Usually, you can have (or do) one or maybe two things go wrong at a time. Add something else and you're on your head. I didn't understand what happened till later that day when I found the guy that was behind me when it happened.

Of course we all still make mistakes. Experience teaches us how to deal with things when they go wrong. This weekend I found myself running in to turn 7 a few too many times on the wrong line and too hot. usually turning in too early. There's no way I could get on the gas, I would have either low sided or drove off into the weeds. I simply held the brakes a little deeper, past the apex till I could get the bike pointed, then added gas.

I'm happy you weren't hurt, and I was nice to finally spend some time to get to get to know you better. I look forward to the next time you're out and we can tear it up together and hopefully I can TRY to give you a welcome to 'A' pass. If I can catch you. :bowdown

If you need a hand with any of the work on your bike, let me know. I'd be happy to help.
 

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still learning to ride...
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618 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Dane,

I was bummed to hear you were in the weeds and see your bike come back on the truck. It was cool hearing you talk about how good you felt on Saturday.

Part of this whole learning experience has to do with realizing when you have to back off a few notches to work on a skill, hit your marks, or just dealing with a pucker moment.

My martial arts instructor still says this (and it's not at all directed at you or your riding). "Poor technique done quickly, is still poor technique." I use that to remind myself to be a better, smoother, more accurate and consistent rider every time I go out. Speed is a by-product of those things. Speed without those things is simply using your balls.

It's good that you know what happened. Do you understand why it was (several) mistakes? I did something similar once on a good friends bike and almost got a ride to the moon. Trying to turn too tight, too fast, which means a lot of lean and then adding gas. The rear stepped out and I was really lucky that it got back in line before launching me Lorenzo style. Usually, you can have (or do) one or maybe two things go wrong at a time. Add something else and you're on your head. I didn't understand what happened till later that day when I found the guy that was behind me when it happened.

Of course we all still make mistakes. Experience teaches us how to deal with things when they go wrong. This weekend I found myself running in to turn 7 a few too many times on the wrong line and too hot. usually turning in too early. There's no way I could get on the gas, I would have either low sided or drove off into the weeds. I simply held the brakes a little deeper, past the apex till I could get the bike pointed, then added gas.

I'm happy you weren't hurt, and I was nice to finally spend some time to get to get to know you better. I look forward to the next time you're out and we can tear it up together and hopefully I can TRY to give you a welcome to 'A' pass. If I can catch you. :bowdown

If you need a hand with any of the work on your bike, let me know. I'd be happy to help.

thanks matt.
the more i think about it the more i think i can understand the combination of what i did wrong. after hix tellin me i turned in too early. i can kinda piece it together. i remember turning in and just thinking (almost like everything was in slo-mo) about what i was doing mid corner. i can vaguely remember being at the apex sooner than normal, or getting on the gas earlier than i normally would, and thats when i started to feel the rear go away.... if that makes any sense...

i appreciate the help you offer. i still have a no start with th bike. i pulled the starter button apart and everything seems fine, i checked a few fuses to. everything is good... i got a post up a gixxer.com and we'll see what some of dem guys have to say...
 

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dig into the clutch switch more. It was stuck, and might need to be replaced.

see about by-passing it to see if it cranks.
 

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Sorry to hear about your crash. Sounds like you've got the reason behind it figured out though.

Glad you're OK!

Great attitude.
 

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Mediocre Strafer
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I'm a little confused - how can you not know when you're at the apex of a turn? It's when you're closest to the inside (in my case trying not to knock the damn sliders off on the curbing). Just trying to clarify what happened in my own mind.

KeS
 

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glad you're ok

i think "mattg" has some very good advice that applies to all types or riding
 

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I'm a little confused - how can you not know when you're at the apex of a turn? It's when you're closest to the inside (in my case trying not to knock the damn sliders off on the curbing). Just trying to clarify what happened in my own mind.

KeS
Since he turned early, he hit the apex early - arrived at the inside curb before he should have/was used to. He then started to apply a little bit of throttle, just as if he'd hit his normal apex. The problem with that was he still had turning to do (because of the early turn-in and apex) and couldn't reduce lean angle. This was a fatal combination - as usual on a big bike.
 

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The Bike Whisperer
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Glad youre okay mang...... and I hate it when others come into the forum. Its kinda like they just walk in with their dick in their hand saying "i thought this was a circle jerk???"
 

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Glad you're OK ya big Knucklhead.That IS the big thing.I wasn't there riding behind you,nor was I on your bike so I certainly am not going to speculate on what happened.By the time this thread has matured,you'll prolly be more confused.You will process it though,and yes,crashing is part of the game.Some say,if you don't crash,you're not pushing hard enough.Well,at a track day,I know NESBA,and Spencer preach CONTROL of the bike,and that's what we all get to work on.Glad your alright bro.
 

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Some say,if you don't crash,you're not pushing hard enough.Well,at a track day,I know NESBA,and Spencer preach CONTROL of the bike,and that's what we all get to work on.Glad your alright bro.

Good point Jigs. The other thing that Spencer preaches is riding within your limits....If you can't hit the Apex at 75% of your max speed how in the world will you hit it at 100%?

Dane...I told you this when we talked and I will tell you again...SLOW DOWN and work on your body position and hitting your marks...in other words...the basics. You have a lot of natural skill on the bike...but that will only take you so far...I hope you understand now that your pace has exceeded your skills.

I'm glad your ok and that you and the bike escaped serious damage....but I hope this serves as a wake up call for you to SLOW DOWN and get the basics down before you notch up the pace...if your not willing to do that then I think we might be reading more threads like this in the future.
 

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Right from my notes at Spencer,the 4 reasons we crash
1)loss or lack of focus
2)Abrupt hands...the faster you go,the slower the hands
3)rushing entrance of a corner,can't get to the apex...plus hurts exit by rushing
4)Repeating a mistake

These are my girlfriends reasons why we crash
1) we're on a motorcycle
2) we're going really,really fast
3)We're on a race track with a bunch of other idiots
 

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Right from my notes at Spencer,the 4 reasons we crash
1)loss or lack of focus
2)Abrupt hands...the faster you go,the slower the hands
3)rushing entrance of a corner,can't get to the apex...plus hurts exit by rushing
4)Repeating a mistake

These are my girlfriends reasons why we crash
1) we're on a motorcycle
2) we're going really,really fast
3)We're on a race track with a bunch of other idiots

couldn't be more right. and funny!

Personally, I really need to work on the first #2 and #3. Once in a while I slip and the throttle chops. One of these days i'll end up on my head for it.
 

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Ha!! You and me both bro,over and over and over....dear God,this is alot of fun but can be alot of work too huh.
 

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Since he turned early, he hit the apex early - arrived at the inside curb before he should have/was used to. He then started to apply a little bit of throttle, just as if he'd hit his normal apex. The problem with that was he still had turning to do (because of the early turn-in and apex) and couldn't reduce lean angle. This was a fatal combination - as usual on a big bike.
Ah, got it. Early apexed the turn, I understand now, thanks.


As for the non-regional member posts - :twofinger. Insular bastards. :lao

KeS
 
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