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Slowpoke
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1,631 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My dad REALLY wants me to take it. Will it really help me? From what I've heard its nothing but low speed maneuvers. He wants me to do it in the name of keeping me alive.

Of course better control of your motorcycle is only going to help, but I'm not that worried about breaking both my legs and getting paralyzed by a little 5mph incident.
 

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Theres no I in threesome
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6,118 Posts
Its just a refresher class and you ride your own bike.

I dont think its necessary if you have a decent number of miles under your belt.
 

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Did your dad buy this bike? He really wants you to do it, it makes him feel better, and he bought the bike for you while you live under his roof then I'd do it out of respect for him. Small chance you won't learn anything but theres a signifigant chance you will.
 

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I can pass this guy...
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8,167 Posts
I've never heard anyone (Who just started riding, or have a few miles) that have not learned something from the MSF course.

You would be surpised how many people get hurt going at low speeds, and how bad they are hurt!

Plus, most insurance companies will give you a discount if you take the MSF course!
 

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A guy on a scruffy bike
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15,367 Posts
It is definitely worthwhile. It is mostly low speed stuff, but includes exercises in swerving and accident avoidance, controlling a rear wheel skid, and proper sight lines (high visual horizon, avoiding target fixation). It also provides an independent experienced observer to help you avoid bad habits and develop good ones.

I've taken it three times, and have benefited each time. I know very experienced riders who take it every year to get the instructor feedback and as a reminder of good riding habits.

So yes, take it, learn something, and make your father happy. Everybody wins.

PhilB
 

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There is absolutely a point, and here it is:

The ERC provides the opportunity for you to demonstrate your skills for an experienced instructor. He or she will be able to tell you what good habits you've attained and point out bad habits that you may have acquired. I recommend that everyone take it after a year or so for just this reason.

Though some might argue, you simply don't learn much about street survival at the track. The "streets" are wide, traffic is controlled and everyone is going in the same direction. While you might learn something about maximum braking and turning, practicing these skills under track conditions also offers little benefit in dealing with street survival situations. Only MSF classes (and comparable curricula) address the things you need to know when something goes wrong.

Make a deal with him. Tell him you'll take the ERC with him if he takes Total Control with you.
 

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Slowpoke
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1,631 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
First off, I paid for half of this bike.

Now, here is the thing I'm worried about:
I've ridden 2 miles on my SV...and that was during the test ride. My dad hasn't let me ride it 2 feet since I've gotten it home. I'm not used to it at all. I don't want to go take the MSF where I'm supposed to put my bike through its low-speed paces and possibly crash and rash it up. (it has ONE scratch on it right now)

I mean, is that a legitimate concern?

I've heard of people crashing before during MSF thats why I'm worried.
 

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Unregistered User
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2,062 Posts
If you're afraid you're gonna crash in an ERC, you've got no business being on the street.

Think about what you posted. You think you're too good or too experienced to derive any benefit from the class, but you're afraid those simple maneuvers are going to make you crash?
 

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Womb Raider
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480 Posts
SVs are easy to control at low speeds. if you're worried about crashing it, then maybe you ought to consider taking the beginner course? if you think you're experienced enough to skip the ERC, you should have no concerns about crashing. btw, which sv did you decide on?

edit: DAMMIT, lds beat me to the point. he must be a smart fella...
 

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If you learn one thing that avoids an accident, injury or death later, then the course will be worth it.

I think I can say with absolute certainity that you will learn at least one thing you didn't know about riding a motorcycle if you take the course. All of the low speed techniques learned are used when riding faster, so that argument that "I don't ride a 5 m.p.h." is null and void.

The worse case senario is you spend some time hanging out with people who are also interested in riding.

If you end up laying down your bike (which is unlikely), at least you'll be doing it in a controlled environment instead of on the streets where things get worse quickly. And if you do lay it down in the controlled environment, you may wish to practice your skills a bit before taking your bike out on the roads.

My opinion has always been that the essence of real riding is continual improvement one's ability to ride and one's knowledge of riding. Be that physical riding skills (turning, accelerating and stopping), safety techniques or in road or racetrack techniques. Making yourself a better, safer rider is what makes the sport so fun (not to mention addicting).
 

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Turbo nerd.
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13,732 Posts
I'm active duty military and was required to take it anyway...for the forth time.

I thought it was fucking great getting a day off to ride my bike and hang out. Now I'm qualified to instruct so I get MORE days off to ride and love it anyway.
 

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I understand how you feel about using your bike in the ERC. I would not expect to drop it, but I know it could happen, and I'd feel like hell if it did.

At 17, sounds like it would be easy to propose taking the Basic course, using their bike, learning stuff, satisfying the Dad, and getting you out on the road on the SV.
 

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Slowpoke
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1,631 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I'm nervous because I have only ridden it 2 miles. My dad has yet to let me ride it since I brought it home. Are you going to try and tell me that I'm supposed to feel 100% comfortable on a bike I have hardly ridden? I wouldn't have had any reservations doing it on my ninja because I have been riding it for a year.


I got the 04
 

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Here at Camp Pendleton we're required to take the BRC before we're allowed to ride. Then we're required to take ERC one year after passing BRC. Training doesn't cease because you're good at something. Continuous training keeps reminding you not to be complacent because something has become normal.

If your dad sprung for half of a new bike for you, and wants to send you to some training to make sure you're more comfortable on your new bike I can't imagine why you wouldn't just take it.

I learned a lot about my brand new bike at BRC doing those low speed techniques that I probably wouldn't have noticed on the street. Even if you are the perfect rider and don't need a second set of eyes giving you riding pointers, different bikes do different things when put into situations and it will help you find out how your specific bike reacts.

I don't think you're going to find anyone on this board that doesn't think you should take the course, so the balls probably in your court to make the ultimate decision.
 

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Part 3 begins
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3,660 Posts
If you're afraid you're gonna crash in an ERC, you've got no business being on the street.

Think about what you posted. You think you're too good or too experienced to derive any benefit from the class, but you're afraid those simple maneuvers are going to make you crash?
my first thought too.

You live under his roof. You are 17. I think you should have some respect for your dad's wishes, considering im SURE you are on his insurance and Im sure he is helping you pay for the bike.

If I had a bike at age 17 my father wouldnt have told me to take the ERC course, he would have smacked the S*** outta me.

good luck on your upcoming ERC Course LOL.
 

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First off, I paid for half of this bike.

Now, here is the thing I'm worried about:
I've ridden 2 miles on my SV...and that was during the test ride. My dad hasn't let me ride it 2 feet since I've gotten it home. I'm not used to it at all. I don't want to go take the MSF where I'm supposed to put my bike through its low-speed paces and possibly crash and rash it up. (it has ONE scratch on it right now)

I mean, is that a legitimate concern?

I've heard of people crashing before during MSF thats why I'm worried.
You need to be in the BRC, not the ERC. Given your description of your experience, I strongly urge you to take the course.

Here are good descriptions of why you should choose each class: Which course is right for you? (Course chooser)
 

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Unregistered User
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2,062 Posts
I'm nervous because I have only ridden it 2 miles. My dad has yet to let me ride it since I brought it home. Are you going to try and tell me that I'm supposed to feel 100% comfortable on a bike I have hardly ridden? I wouldn't have had any reservations doing it on my ninja because I have been riding it for a year.


I got the 04
Don't be nervous. One of the first things they'll tell you at the beginning of the ERC is that you don't have to do anything you're uncomfortable doing or that makes you feel uneasy.

Look at it another way...

One of the best ways to get to know a new bike is to putt around in a parking lot and see what it will do, how it handles, how it responds. Wouldn't it be kind of nice to get the added bonus of an insurance discount at the same time AND the benefit of experienced RiderCoaches analyzing your riding and giving you tips to make you better?

I see a lot of people coming through ERCs on 'new to them' motorcycles. A lot of people think that's the best way to get familiar with a new machine.

Oh, BTW. They removed the exercise with the (intentional) rear tire skid a couple of years ago.
 

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Triple Fuel Injected
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287 Posts
First off, I paid for half of this bike.

Now, here is the thing I'm worried about:
I've ridden 2 miles on my SV...and that was during the test ride. My dad hasn't let me ride it 2 feet since I've gotten it home. I'm not used to it at all. I don't want to go take the MSF where I'm supposed to put my bike through its low-speed paces and possibly crash and rash it up. (it has ONE scratch on it right now)

I mean, is that a legitimate concern?

I've heard of people crashing before during MSF thats why I'm worried.
Why don't you take the BRC and rash up their bikes?
 
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