Sport Bikes banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
364 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just took the MSF course this weekend and I thought it pretty much sucked. I've only been riding for a couple months but i thought it to be pretty slow and boring. Im sure most people loved it but I just thought it was kind of a drag. The instructors were cool and it would be good for someone who hasnt ridden before or likes just taking it easy around a parking lot, but thats not my idea of fun really. I did learn a few things but not enough to justify the 200 dollars spent on the course. My advice is if you have been riding for a while and still want to take a class for some reason, take the experienced riders course and that might be better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,759 Posts
Nearly a year under my belt and I am shelling out 250 for it in july. What was so bad?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
I take mine in two weeks. Also have some experience(6 months). Your post only confirms my belief that it will be a waste of time....FOR THE MOST PART.

ibflames.
 

·
Fitshaced
Joined
·
1,888 Posts
I took mine after a few months of experience and it was slow and boring but I still learned a lot of stuff like how to do figure 8's in a small box. Either way you didn't lose money because most insurance companies offer discounts after completion.
 

·
You got that right.
Joined
·
10,228 Posts
First negative review I've heard on MSF. I share some of your opinon...

I had one woman in my course that couldn't figure out the friction zone if her life depended on it, so we spend almost 30 additional minutes on how to use a clutch while in gear.

However, I really enjoyed the input from the instructors. We had two really knowledgeable instructors that picked me apart and I made the corrections and learned how to ride right. The advise they dish out is really priceless. Worth the $250 I spent, IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,204 Posts
If you don't learn something you are probably not going in open minded. Yes most of the course is learning the basics..where the clutch is, etc...etc. But, there is also alot of how to "Ride" which most instructors will tell you, even the guys that ride for 20 years before they take the MSF learn a whole lot....becuase they do alot of things wrong. That is what my instructor told me. Be open minded thats the key to learning anything you "think" you know everything about. IMHO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
I would disagree, though 200 is a little to much. I paid 100 for mine. Well, It's like a defensive driving class for motorcycles. It also helps prevent bad habbits from forming. Believe it or not, but there are still people that think you can steer a bike without counter-steering.
 

·
You got that right.
Joined
·
10,228 Posts
seppuku said:
Believe it or not, but there are still people that think you can steer a bike without counter-steering.
I counter-weight in low speed turns. :neener
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,103 Posts
I took the course in '91 and am taking it again in 2005

Most important things I learned:

-watch for vehicles turning left in front of you at intersections, cover clutch and brake

-squeeze gas tank when going over slippery stuff like wet manhole covers and metal plates in road.

-don't panic if you lock rear brakes
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
Yep, I agree with another poster that you probably didn't go into it with an open mind. If you knew what you were doing with some of the drills, you should have used that opportunity to try some things in a controlled environment. I had some seat time before I went into the class and still learned a lot. The only regret I had was not "playing" more in the class. When are you going to have a situation where you have a course laid out for you, you're riding on someone else's bike, and you have instructors watching your technique? If you didn't like the BRC, don't think the ERC will be any better for you. I took that class too. It's basically the BRC all over again without the beginning riding stuff. You do all the same drills with a couple of new ones added. The biggest difference is that you do the course on your own bike. The skills test at the end of the class is the exact same test you did in the BRC.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
Forgot to add that Maryland has another BRC class that falls in the middle of the regular BRC and the ERC. It's intended for people that have ridden but don't have their endorsement or enough seat time to take the ERC. That class skips over some of the beginner drills assuming you already have a grasp on the concepts.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,093 Posts
con man said:
I did learn a few things but not enough to justify the 200 dollars spent on the course.
If ONE of those things that you learned keeps you from crashing your bike and possibly getting hurt just ONE time, it was worth 200, or more, you can't put a price on your life, PERIOD.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
436 Posts
i had experience before going but i def learned some things that if i didn't go to the class i prob would have done in a panic on the street (i.e. not breaking in the corners).
Also i had to do mine in the rain...althought it was a pain i got the experience in the rain with instructors there to aid. I recommend it to everyone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
910 Posts
The MSF is not what it used to be. More importantly, it's not what it should be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
623 Posts
I took the course here in NYC and paid 350 for the course not to mention the tolls and gas I paid getting to the place which was held behind a horse race track. I had to be there around 8:30 am or 9 am I believe and if you were late you were dropped. I lived a good hour drive and it was a crazy weekend since the course is Friday-Sunday. When I went into it I had 2 months experience on my 250 Ninja and during that time I had ridden it on highways, streets, and everywhere. However, I learned to ride from friends and found the course to be ‘slow’ at first but I did leave with a few very good life saving lessons. So overall I recommend it to anyone who hasn’t taking it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,682 Posts
ZX10 Guy said:
Forgot to add that Maryland has another BRC class that falls in the middle of the regular BRC and the ERC. It's intended for people that have ridden but don't have their endorsement or enough seat time to take the ERC. That class skips over some of the beginner drills assuming you already have a grasp on the concepts.
The BRC II (as its called in Maryland) uses the ERC curriculum, word for word. The only difference is that it is a license granting class. The 7.5 hour class is aimed at the rider with one or more years of experience who doesn't yet have a Maryland Class M license (motorcycle endorsement.)

ERC classes are generally smaller and focus more on coaching to refine technique and eliminate bad habits. In the BRC II the focus is on ensuring riders have the skills they've claimed and getting them licensed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
706 Posts
jiffy said:
If you don't learn something you are probably not going in open minded. Yes most of the course is learning the basics..where the clutch is, etc...etc. But, there is also alot of how to "Ride" which most instructors will tell you, even the guys that ride for 20 years before they take the MSF learn a whole lot....becuase they do alot of things wrong. That is what my instructor told me. Be open minded thats the key to learning anything you "think" you know everything about. IMHO.
Good Post. :dblthumb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
Wow! You guys have to pay that much for and MSF course? In Ohio it is only $25 bucks for the class. I took it last September. At the end of the class they take you through the test. I walked away with a card to get my license saying I already passed the drivers test. The advanced class is also $25. I am taking the advanced class this August.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,240 Posts
If you didn't get anything out of course, then you didn't pay attention. After almost 15 yrs in the saddle, I also took the MSF (due to Wisconsin not letting me reinstate my M class from Texas) and I was amazed at all the things that I had been doing wrong. I had to sit back and laugh. :lol

One thing that ppl don't seem to understand is that the class itself isn't meant to be "fun" it's there to inform you on how you should be riding, what you need to know and maybe what to expect. By taking it in a controlled condition like a parking lot, is a great idea, due to that most new riders don't just go out, purchase a bike, and hit the street. (or at least the ones that do find themselves over whelmed by it all and hurt themselves and others and God forbid, kill themselves) I was the only one in the class that had been on a bike before, and I thought it to be an advantage, but reality, it wasn't. For a new rider it's a great course and for the seasoned rider, it's a great way to put you in your place, thinking since all the time spent in the saddle, you know all.

I find it sad that you didn't walk away from the class with at least some sort of knowledge that it may have made you a more mature and responsible rider.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top