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Would it hurt my tires or bearing or anything to mount and balance my tires myself? I would be using 2 jacks and a steel pole that was level untill I get a mounting mackine for around 45
 

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No, you shouldn't hurt anything if you know what you are doing.

You won't get a good balance using 2 jacks and a steel pole - the wheel bearings have seals and grease that add too much drag

Hop on ebay and get a real balancer, only about $80 for a perfectly usable chinese one


I don't use a mounting machine. Just get or make a bead breaker, and a couple Stubby plastic tire irons - Stubby Tire Tools - webBikeWorld
 

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Silent pipes take lives
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The hardest part is seating the bead, IMO.
 

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I'll gladly pay the dealer $35 to change the tire and balance the wheel cos it is a tough DIY job using tire levers. Worse still is that those delicate aluminum rims may get cracked prying on them and you won't want to see the price of a new wheel.
 

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I'll gladly pay the dealer $35 to change the tire and balance the wheel cos it is a tough DIY job using tire levers. Worse still is that those delicate aluminum rims may get cracked prying on them and you won't want to see the price of a new wheel.
Stop commenting on shit you don't know about.

1) It isn't tough to DIY a tire change. I do them all the time.
2) It costs more than $35 to get a tire changed if you're in the city.
3) You aren't going to crack a "delicate aluminum wheel" with just a tire iron. The tire will break before the rim ever does.

Have you ever tried to change a tire? If not, your opinion does not matter.
 

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I'll gladly pay the dealer $35 to change the tire and balance the wheel cos it is a tough DIY job using tire levers. Worse still is that those delicate aluminum rims may get cracked prying on them and you won't want to see the price of a new wheel.
I've done dozens of motorcycle and tens of thousands of bicycle. Never damaged a rim

If people are they are doing it wrong


Sent from Motorcycle.com App
 

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Yes, a good volume of air makes seating the tire much easier. I just helped a friend who tried with a small compressor, didn't seal, they thought the bead was torn or damaged. I broke the bead, and a good blast with my compressor popped it on, no leaks.
 

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Silent pipes take lives
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If you have a small pancake compressor like I do and it won't seat by itself, you can hook a ratchet strap around the circumference of the tire and strap it down. Always works.
If by "always" you mean "sometimes" then sure.

I did exactly that and all it did was compress the tire down. Lots of soap used, but no movement of the sidewalls toward their respective beads. Maybe it was that specific tire design.

I just need to get a compressor that can move enough air. :D
 

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Hmm. I've never had an issue. Even did it at a gas station air pump before. All I have is a little Husky air compressor that I can pick up and move around, and it even leaks a bit.
 

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Air volume is needed if the tire can't get a seal to the rim before its seated. That's why zip ties or straps can help. I had a used one a buddy wanted mounted so chewed it couldn't seal

Air pressure will seat just about anything.


Sent from Motorcycle.com App
 

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real tire lube on the inner part of the rim will help it seat so much easier.
I used to use soap but tried some of the lube and it is worth paying for.

I used to mount mine by hand but i found a tire changer on ebay for $160.
they're actually from harbor freight. which doesn't sell them anymore.
the only problem is the rim clamps will scratch the hell out of the rim and so does the mount bar.

I plan on ordering the nomar mount bar. so far I've tried dipping the clamps in a ureathane resin we use at work. it's much harder than the rubber caps that comes on it but it's still soft enough the rim cuts through it.
I might try using a strip of leather and glue it to the clamps.

and I have the harbor freight balancer too. which does a fabulous job. the changers are still all over ebay if you want one you better hurry. I don't think they're going to last.
for the money it's worth buying.

I put the spring on it to hold the bead breaker up. it made it so much easier to use.
just some spring I got at a hardware store. it was a bit too long so I wrapped it around the post tube and it provides the right amount of tension to hold it up with the handle in it.

the balancer I had to tap the set screw in the cones with a 1/4 20 tap and put a new set screw in them. the ones that it comes with are so soft they stripped the first time I used it.

it is harbor freight lol









btw, the harbor freight tool box in the pic, 10Xs the tool box my craftsman box was...they're on sale right now. or they were 2 weeks ago. $399 from $649. I have it loaded with I would guess 500+ lbs and one drawer probaby has 70lbs in it and it still rolls like it does empty. they put 2 bearing slides on each side of he large drawers. and the steel is a few thousandths thicker than any craftsman box.

I'm not big fan of harbor freight but I got to give them credit on these 3 items. the tool box is top notch and the other 2 are a decent tool for home use.

 

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Changing tires

Stop commenting on shit you don't know about.

1) It isn't tough to DIY a tire change. I do them all the time.
2) It costs more than $35 to get a tire changed if you're in the city.
3) You aren't going to crack a "delicate aluminum wheel" with just a tire iron. The tire will break before the rim ever does.

Have you ever tried to change a tire? If not, your opinion does not matter.
-I was changing tires on motorcycles with levers on STEEL rims long before you were born.
-No, it is cheap to have a tire changed and balanced at any motorcycle dealer if you remove the wheel and take it in.
-Sorry but YOU are full of shit cos aluminum will not bend but quickly crack when too much pressure is applied. A proper pneumatic tire changing machine eliminates this probability. No way I would do a DIY tire change on an aluminum rim using levers; a new wheel can easily run $600-$1000. If you want to take that chance well good luck!
 

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I've done tire changes with all of the fancy gears money can buy, and still I prefer to use the Tire monkeys to do it. Really $30 bucks is a small price to pay to insure your $1000-4000 rims.
 
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