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needs another beer
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i'm very interested in buying a mountain bike but honestly i know nothing about them. i plan on riding to work everyday (10 miles each way) but i also plan on taking it up into the mountains at least a couple times a month. i've heard that frame size is a big deal, i'm 5'10" and weigh 175 pounds. what kind of things should i be looking for? i'll probably be looking for something used, right around the $300 range.
 

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not a dis, but go ride them all, in that range and get the one you like. they will all be pretty much the same in that range.
 

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i would go to your local bike shop talk to them they will be able to answer your questions the best. also they should know the area you are planning on riding and give you the best bike for what you want to spend and be able to test ride

just wondering if you realize how far 10 miles are to ride to and from work . what do you do for work
 

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Not always on two
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$300 wont get you much. $800 will get you a bike that you can use for a very long time. Dependable and can take abuse. Look into used Specialized Rockhoppers, Stumpjumpers, the Epic, etc. You can save a lot of money by staying with hardtails, (no rear suspension), but if you're going to go to the mountains a few times a month...it would be a good investment.

I ride downhill/freeride, and park. Still fights against my zx10r for time.
 

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Whatever you decide to buy, make sure you have two sets of tires. One set of semislicks for commuting and another set for mountain biking. 10 miles is a long way to go on full knobbies.

Also, stay away from any dual suspension bike in that price range. For your situation, dual suspension isn't appropriate. Dual suspension sucks for commuting unless you have a set up like Iron Horse's DW-Link that eliminates pedal bob. Dual suspension isn't really necessary for the trails you'd be likely to do as a beginner either. In fact, unless you're racing, I'd say that a hardtail bike (front suspension only) is more fun to ride than a dual suspension bike.

As for choosing a bike, try to go to a shop and sit on as many as possible. You're not that heavy so you shouldn't really have to worry about frame strength/flex issues. Concentrate on getting a frame that you're comfortable with. Don't worry about components. You can upgrade those as they break.
 

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Yeh I was going to reccomend something like a Specialized P.1 or something like that. My old roomie used to have one and it was pretty cool.
 

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Not always on two
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Yeh I was going to reccomend something like a Specialized P.1 or something like that. My old roomie used to have one and it was pretty cool.
I dont think you're going to want a P.1, as they are single fixed gear. P.2 would be your best bet. One my my park bikes is a 06' P.2, LOVE it. But you're still going to spend 700$ for a 2005-2007. Brand new I beleive they are 1250 now.
 

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I dont think you're going to want a P.1, as they are single fixed gear. P.2 would be your best bet. One my my park bikes is a 06' P.2, LOVE it. But you're still going to spend 700$ for a 2005-2007. Brand new I beleive they are 1250 now.
You can find em for 3-4 if you look. But id still ride the p.1 i love that thing. And uhhhh. Single Speed FTW. But maybe not for commuting haha
 

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cool bikes but i don't think i can affor $3000 for a bicycle
You don't want one of them anyway. Avoid a full floating suspension and get a hard tail. If you're going to be riding to work a lot, you'll enjoy the stiffer frame and the lighter weight.

Gonzo downhillers can make full use of a full floater. You don't sound like a gonzo downhiller.
 

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I agree with the comments about buying a hardtail bike, but disagree with the comment about not worrying about components.

I would find a bike with the best components in your price range... and a bike shop can help you with that. Maybe visit a bike shop to get an idea of what's "good" and then cruise Craigslist to see if anyone has one that fits your needs.
 

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I agree with the comments about buying a hardtail bike, but disagree with the comment about not worrying about components.

I would find a bike with the best components in your price range... and a bike shop can help you with that. Maybe visit a bike shop to get an idea of what's "good" and then cruise Craigslist to see if anyone has one that fits your needs.
Yeah, this too. Take the money that otherwise would have been spent on the rear suspension, and put it into derailleurs and brakes and bottom brackets and stuff.
 

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The only reason I posted that link about downhill bikes is because I was looking to do that at Keystone last week and rentals are $97 for the day. I figured that was way to much, so thus I did not go. Then I look them up and see okay they cost $3K-$6K (which I have no idea why, just a gimmick I guess). So I can understand now the rental cost.

If you go to the mountains you will want a fully suspension bike. I'm looking at getting one at REI (your in CO so you know who they are I assume). You can also get a rear shock that will lock turning it into a hardtail for when your going up hill. They have great return policies (no questions asked) for as long as you own the product. Meaning you buy a $800 fully suspension bike and do a bunch of downhill riding and tear it up you simple take it back and get a new one. Or pay the differance and move up to even a nicer one. :) That is what I'm looking to do, I love REI. REI: Outdoor Gear, Equipment & Clothing for Camping, Hiking, Cycling, Fitness, Kayaking, Canoeing and More
 

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I'm also afraid that $300 isn't enough for a new bike, and I agree that $800 will get a usable hardtail.

I work in a shop that routinely sells bikes in the $4-7K range, so I'm a little spoiled, but if you depend on a piece of machinery to get you home from the back country, it seems logical to spend whatever it takes.

You'd do the same with a motorcycle, eh?

db
 

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Well....I can ride my BMX bike up to 20 miles on any given day, and it's just a mish mash of parts I managed to scrounge up form a bunch of people. I even ride it in the winter. there have been many parts change outs, lemme tell ya.

BTW: I'm 6'2, pushing 6'3, only 165 pounds though. And the bike is utterly comfortable, despite having no real suspension whatsoever.
 

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Well then look for a P.1 if you like riding your bmx you will love a P.1. Its like a big boy bmx bike!! Promise. Or I have a 24" DK bmx bike that I would sell if your interested. Ill make you a good deal on it.
 

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I've raced downhill, ridden cross country, trials, worked at a bike shop.
Couple notes:
Do not get a downhill bike.
$300 will get you the vespa of mountain bikes.
$7-800 you can get a quality bike.
p1/p2 are not good for what you want, they are play/hucking bikes, not cross country
do not buy anything from REI, target, wallmart, mejir, etc. Go to a bike shop or buy online.
10 miles is not far to ride on knobbies...at all. Dont worry about it. You don't need two sets of wheels.
 
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