Sport Bikes banner

1 - 20 of 51 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
773 Posts
i was thinking about that the other day i have never heard of it but im sure it has happened. do you know if the rider was hurt?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
304 Posts
How can that happen when the rubber insulate the bike from the ground.
Just like in a car. They say if it is lighting around you, the two safest place is your house and your car.

Unless the bike didn't get hit by lighting, but the rider did. He/She must had been at a stop and his feet was on the ground. That is the only way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
304 Posts
Ok, I should have read the article first. It was raining and he was wet. Now that make sense.
 

·
what R you lookin' at?
Joined
·
5,313 Posts
i've heard of a few M/C getting hit before.........it happens, not often.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,525 Posts
I remember my MSF course covered topic about rain and lightning. I remember my instructor saying "You can ride safely in the rain, but there's no telling when lightning will strike especially in flat open areas and high elevations."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
600 Posts
njdjh2o said:
How can that happen when the rubber insulate the bike from the ground.
Just like in a car. They say if it is lighting around you, the two safest place is your house and your car.

Unless the bike didn't get hit by lighting, but the rider did. He/She must had been at a stop and his feet was on the ground. That is the only way.
Even if you have dry wheels, you can still get hit by lightning and toasted on a motorcycle.

The rubber in the tires does NOTHING to insulate you from a lightning strike. Keep in mind, that electricity is travelling through AIR several thousand feet to make it to the ground. A few inches of rubber isn't going to stop it, that's for damn sure.

Now, when lightning strikes a car, the bolt doesn't have to travel through the driver or passengers to reach the ground. It goes from the chassis, through the tires, and onto the ground. There's no need for it to have to travel through the passengers, since they're not as good of conductors as the chassis of the vehicle. With a motorcycle, lightning will probably hit the highest point first - invariably the rider.
 

·
Mexican Hard Shell Taco
Joined
·
5,894 Posts
rubber tires????


Do you think that 4 inches of rubber will isolate 100,000,000 volts??? 4 inches of rubber would be like a conductor compared to the resistance of the miles of air the lightning traveled through.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,892 Posts
Süsser Tod said:
Do you think that 4 inches of rubber will isolate 100,000,000 volts?

Its like when someone on a golf course gets hit and 5 people around them also die even though they werent directly hit.

My great grandmother told me a story about a relative who was riding his horse with a few other guys on a ranch. Only one was hit but they were all killed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
304 Posts
Ohm's law or somebody law, electricity travel the easy path.

Yes, 4 inch of rubber can isolate 100,000,000 volts. Those people that work on those high power electric line gloves are thinner than our tires. Those lines might not carry 100,000,000 volts but it alot. I believe it not the volts thats kill you it the current that kills you. Lighting has alot of voltage, but very little current and it the current that runs though your body. That is probably why he didn't die.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,600 Posts
njdjh2o said:
How can that happen when the rubber insulate the bike from the ground.
Just like in a car. They say if it is lighting around you, the two safest place is your house and your car.

Unless the bike didn't get hit by lighting, but the rider did. He/She must had been at a stop and his feet was on the ground. That is the only way.

I have been hit by lightening in my plane several times...it goes where it wants
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
649 Posts
Repeater said:
Even if you have dry wheels, you can still get hit by lightning and toasted on a motorcycle.

The rubber in the tires does NOTHING to insulate you from a lightning strike. Keep in mind, that electricity is travelling through AIR several thousand feet to make it to the ground. A few inches of rubber isn't going to stop it, that's for damn sure.

Now, when lightning strikes a car, the bolt doesn't have to travel through the driver or passengers to reach the ground. It goes from the chassis, through the tires, and onto the ground. There's no need for it to have to travel through the passengers, since they're not as good of conductors as the chassis of the vehicle. With a motorcycle, lightning will probably hit the highest point first - invariably the rider.
This guy has it right...^^ When lighning passes through the rubber tires, it will sometimes blow them out. Doesn't really matter if the tires were rubber or made from copper, the lighning is headed toward earth.
 

·
F-You and Yourspace!
Joined
·
799 Posts
I remember a video clip of a soccer match somewhere, and it shows a lightning bolt hit the wet field near the sideline, and half the team dropped. But noone was killed.
 

·
Back in Black
Joined
·
5,538 Posts
Isn't the rubber tires are made of, made out of carbon (pretty sure they are)? Carbon is conductive, and while the rubber may isolate SOME voltage, there isn't much that will stop a lightning strike.
 
1 - 20 of 51 Posts
Top