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WYPIWYG
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just saw a motorcycle accessories section at my local Wal-Mart. Didn't check it out up close but I did see some Bell Helmets. Just thought I would let you guys know.
 

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TD Survivor
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yeah i was suprised to see helmets gloves and other misc stuff there too
 

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04Fizzer said:
I don't know that I'd trust buying a helmet from Walmart.
agreed
 

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I used to drive commercial big rigs and hauled 1000's of Wal-Mart loads (11 years worth)...I resist the urge to purchase any electronics or other shock-sensitive items from Wal-Mart. It's amazing what goes on in the warehouses...especially at crossdocking facilities (where stuff comes out of ship containers and gets loaded into road trailers). BTW, just an FYI, Sears is worse, lol--picture clamp trucks (forklifts with clamps), using 2 refrigerators, ramming the open back of a trailer to force the last row of refrigerators in enough in order to close the trailer doors. Once you see that stuff, you ALWAYS shop a bit more carefully. :D
 

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It's made of people!
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Oops :) I bought a Bell helmet from Wal*Mart. It was just to tide me over in the Motorcycle safty class. Once I actually got the bike I bought a Shoei.

Actually the Bell is pretty nice. It doesn't fog as quickly as the Shoei. I inspected the helmets packaging like a CSI agent on crack and it seemed to be flawless. It will work for a passenger helmet or to bomb around on my CT70.
 

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I bought a motorcycle cover at walmort one weekend when we were at the lake cabin and looked like rain. I think it was $15 and has actually been a really good cover especially considering what I paid for it. It even has the heat reflective stuff in the back for the exhaust.
 

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yeah, I saw those bell helments too at Wally World, at first I thought they were toy helments or bicycle helments for kids that wanted to cool or something. I don't think I could every buy a Wally World helmet no matter who makes it. Just something about buying that type of gear at Wal-Mart. I wouldn't even buy it for a passenger helment, I want her face to stay just as pretty as it is today.
 

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It's made of people!
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I don't think it's that big of a piece of crap. I think of it like this. It's still DOT approved (not snell of course) and Bell wouldn't last very long as a company if everyone wearing their helmets were getting hurt. Wal mart would surley get their a**es sued by somebody if the helmet failed. Besides, those helmets are plastic and not some high tech composite. From what I've read plastics are a lot more forgiving to shock than graphite and composites.

I am by no means a helmet expert. This is just my opinion. After all... I did buy a Shoei.
 

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Ride Naked
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redF7sp said:
I bought a motorcycle cover at walmort one weekend when we were at the lake cabin and looked like rain. I think it was $15 and has actually been a really good cover especially considering what I paid for it. It even has the heat reflective stuff in the back for the exhaust.

I can see getting one of those covers... or MAYBE a disc lock... but you couldn't GIVE me one of those helmets. Then again, they probably couldn't be any WORSE than my old KBC! :rolleyes
 

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I actually have several helmets, 2 shoei for freeway high speed and a cheaper fliptop for just trips close to home, Ive read many reviews and I think they will take the hit to the ground but not going 70 or more on the freeway;-)
 

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Bell is a legitimate company and a former industry leader. They've been on the ropes for some years now and are attempting to regain their former status. Though I'm not sure Walmart is the correct strategy.

As a little bit of history, Bell is the inventor of the expanded foam liner found in every helmet made today. It's the reason helmets work.
 

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WYPIWYG
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Not so sure about the shipping concerns that were posted. Who's to say the distribution warehouses that deliver goods to the stealerships dont handle packages the same way.

I will have to look into the cover. I will need one b4 winter. $15 sounds right up my alley!
 

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jim schmidt said:
Bell is a legitimate company and a former industry leader. They've been on the ropes for some years now and are attempting to regain their former status. Though I'm not sure Walmart is the correct strategy.
So was Levi Strauss, until they made a separate, cheaper line of jeans, just for lil ole Walsmart!

I agree with the strategy part. :)
 

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Are these helmets just out there on a shelf, or behind glass?
If just on a shelf.. I am sure every little rug-rat that saw them, put one on and ran around the store bouncing their head off of things..
 

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Hippie said:
Are these helmets just out there on a shelf, or behind glass?
If just on a shelf.. I am sure every little rug-rat that saw them, put one on and ran around the store bouncing their head off of things..
They are just out on a shelf, they have motocross style helments too.
 

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Sorry, my string's getting pulled, lol. ;)

A good deal of product bound for Wal-Mart, not all, is "hand stacked" in trailers...that is to say manual labor takes items from a pallet brought into a trailer by a forklift or hand cart. The loaders have the goal of filling EVERY possible square inch of the trailer by whatever means necessary (lighter materials only, US roads limit trucks to 40 tons in normal operation) in order to get the biggest bang for the buck (many contracts are "by trailer load" and not necessarily mileage/weight and just double stacking pallets of goods in a trailer waste a helluva lot of space). Not everyone loading has a smile on their face and is careful with the boxes they're drop-kicking to the celing. Common practice dictates that a trailer is loaded from the floor to the ceiling for the majority of the trailer- near the end of the trailer, items are "stacked down", like a set of steps, to the rear threshold of the trailer. This practice is intended to "secure" the load against shifting. Typical hand stack items, for Wal-Mart, are clothing, small/medium boxed electronics, garden odds n ends, paper products...that sort of stuff. Heavier items like dish soap, foodstuffs/beverages, appliances are usually left shrinkwrapped on pallets.

I remember getting my trailer loaded at a small electronics distributor in East LA for Wal-Mart. I had a 53' trailer getting loaded with nothing but Emerson clock radios. Almost every clock radio, for the first 3/4's of the trailer load, were thrown into the trailer to the guys up front doing the stacking. Drop kicks were NOT uncommon when getting the boxes up front. It was a wild scene to watch.

A great deal of Wal-Mart items travel via train from the various seaports in the US...even those items marked as "Made in the USA"...inside the Chinese box, lol. Train travel for freight tends to involve violent shaking and jarring from trains pulling out slack on the cars and normal track operations- the hand stack items, even when "stacked down", tend to have a habit of crashing around inside the trailer, which leads to unexpected surprises for the truck driver opening the trailer doors for delivery. The same goes for even the most securely wrapped and palleted items if there's too much open space left between the last pallet on the trailer and the trailer doors.

Wal-Mart's not alone with questionable freight, most of the big name stores experience the same problems. I can't tell you the number of broken toilets I've had crash out of my trailer when making a delivery at Home Depot, lol. Those items are braced in with nailed-in wooden bracing and the train still batters them.

I'd say out of the big name stores, Target is probably near the top with freight handling...very organized and mechanized. Sears and K-Mart would be at the absolute bottoms and Wal-Mart wouldn't be too far from them. K-Mart, up until a few years ago, was using 1950's technology in their warehouses...it was a joke.

I hate to say it, but unionized warehouses seem to have the worst of the "don't care how it's loaded or unloaded" attitude when it comes to freight- pride in the job seems to have been replaced by other concerns. For most of the big name stores, union warehouses/transportation corridors aren't generally in the distribution chain (except for the railroads and some truck lines), but if a grocery store product is mentioned...watch out, lol- whole other horror story.

Frick...I've rambled, lol.


Fazer6PA said:
Not so sure about the shipping concerns that were posted. Who's to say the distribution warehouses that deliver goods to the stealerships dont handle packages the same way.

I will have to look into the cover. I will need one b4 winter. $15 sounds right up my alley!
 

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Burnspot said:
Sorry, my string's getting pulled, lol. ;)

A good deal of product bound for Wal-Mart, not all, is "hand stacked" in trailers...that is to say manual labor takes items from a pallet brought into a trailer by a forklift or hand cart. The loaders have the goal of filling EVERY possible square inch of the trailer by whatever means necessary (lighter materials only, US roads limit trucks to 40 tons in normal operation) in order to get the biggest bang for the buck (many contracts are "by trailer load" and not necessarily mileage/weight and just double stacking pallets of goods in a trailer waste a helluva lot of space). Not everyone loading has a smile on their face and is careful with the boxes they're drop-kicking to the celing. Common practice dictates that a trailer is loaded from the floor to the ceiling for the majority of the trailer- near the end of the trailer, items are "stacked down", like a set of steps, to the rear threshold of the trailer. This practice is intended to "secure" the load against shifting. Typical hand stack items, for Wal-Mart, are clothing, small/medium boxed electronics, garden odds n ends, paper products...that sort of stuff. Heavier items like dish soap, foodstuffs/beverages, appliances are usually left shrinkwrapped on pallets.

I remember getting my trailer loaded at a small electronics distributor in East LA for Wal-Mart. I had a 53' trailer getting loaded with nothing but Emerson clock radios. Almost every clock radio, for the first 3/4's of the trailer load, were thrown into the trailer to the guys up front doing the stacking. Drop kicks were NOT uncommon when getting the boxes up front. It was a wild scene to watch.

A great deal of Wal-Mart items travel via train from the various seaports in the US...even those items marked as "Made in the USA"...inside the Chinese box, lol. Train travel for freight tends to involve violent shaking and jarring from trains pulling out slack on the cars and normal track operations- the hand stack items, even when "stacked down", tend to have a habit of crashing around inside the trailer, which leads to unexpected surprises for the truck driver opening the trailer doors for delivery. The same goes for even the most securely wrapped and palleted items if there's too much open space left between the last pallet on the trailer and the trailer doors.

Wal-Mart's not alone with questionable freight, most of the big name stores experience the same problems. I can't tell you the number of broken toilets I've had crash out of my trailer when making a delivery at Home Depot, lol. Those items are braced in with nailed-in wooden bracing and the train still batters them.

I'd say out of the big name stores, Target is probably near the top with freight handling...very organized and mechanized. Sears and K-Mart would be at the absolute bottoms and Wal-Mart wouldn't be too far from them. K-Mart, up until a few years ago, was using 1950's technology in their warehouses...it was a joke.

I hate to say it, but unionized warehouses seem to have the worst of the "don't care how it's loaded or unloaded" attitude when it comes to freight- pride in the job seems to have been replaced by other concerns. For most of the big name stores, union warehouses/transportation corridors aren't generally in the distribution chain (except for the railroads and some truck lines), but if a grocery store product is mentioned...watch out, lol- whole other horror story.

Frick...I've rambled, lol.

That's why unions suck. They don't have to worry about losing their job because they'll just get another one somewhere else because they're union. Don't get me wrong, unions can be and are a good thing when used correctly.

K-mart blows big hairy donkey nuts. They all went out of business up here. K-mart and Ames.
 

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Burnspot said:
Train travel for freight tends to involve violent shaking and jarring from trains pulling out slack on the cars and normal track operations- the hand stack items, even when "stacked down", tend to have a habit of ...
Shipping loads are horrible...we did some analysis before shipping some space hardware with ups,fedex, etc ... based on data from the companies themselves, ground transportation loads can be worse than what we see on the shuttle!!! It's amazing anything makes it to us in one piece...
 
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