Sport Bikes banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
What does it say if you don't want to sign up? :D
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,864 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Dexter_643 said:
What does it say if you don't want to sign up? :D
Strange I didn't have to sign up to read the article. here is the article:

FZ6 is anything but basic

Labeled a ''middleweight standard,'' the FZ6 should please a variety of riders, as it is friendly enough for newcomers and spunky enough for the experienced.

BY JAMES HESKETH

Special to The Herald


It is nearly impossible to just call a motorcycle a motorcycle these days. This is world where even nonspecialized motorcycles have become a specialty. There seems to be an obsessive need to classify and label everything.

So the moto-nomenclature has adopted the term ''middleweight-standard'' for what is essentially a basic motorcycle, one that doesn't fit into one of the three main categories -- cruiser, sportbike or touring bike.

Yamaha's entry into this middleweight-standard class is the FZ6.

Introduced earlier this year, the FZ6 is comfortable and friendly enough for new riders, spunky and stylish enough for experienced riders and affordable enough that anyone who is serious about buying a motorcycle will not be turned off by its price.

The FZ6 is just a motorcycle -- oh, but what a motorcycle it is.

Derived from the YZF-R6, an all-out 600cc track-worthy sportbike, Yamaha retuned the high-performance engine to make it friendlier in real-world traffic, reworked the ergonomics to provide a comfortable riding position and replaced the high-tech, race-quality suspension and brake components with less expensive -- but still adequate -- parts.

The 16-valve, liquid-cooled 98-hp, inline four can push the 428 pounds (dry weight) bike up to a top speed of just under 140 mph, with ease. Electronic fuel injection working with a catalytic converter keeps the emissions to a legal output as exhaust gasses pass through the dual under-seat mufflers.

Running the exhaust up and under the seat also helps when carrying luggage by eliminating the possibility of the bags resting against hot, side-mounted mufflers. A heat shield placed between the tops of the mufflers and the seat bottom helps keep the heat away from the rider's bottom.

Yamaha says the bike should get around 40 mpg and, with a 5.1-gallon fuel tank, that makes for 200 miles or so between stops at the gas station.

I had a chance to spend an afternoon on a FZ6 several months ago during Daytona Bike Week. I spent the morning on a YZF-R1, Yamaha's top of the line 1000cc sportbike and really welcomed the more relaxed riding ''attitude'' of the smaller bike.

The sharp looking, small, frame-mounted half-fairing kept the wind off my chest and did a good job of directing airflow over my helmet. At five-foot six-inches, small fairings were fine. But taller riders may be interested in the larger windshield Yamaha offers as an option.

The seat, at 31.5 inches off the ground, shouldn't give any riders grief when it comes to holding the bike up at stops. The comfortable reach to the handlebars combined with practically placed foot pegs gives the bike a practical ''ride-all-day'' feel when sitting on the well-padded seat.

The rear seat looked like it should be comfortable, and with two convenient grab rails on either side of the seat passengers can feel as secure on the back as the rider does. These grab rails will also make good places to hook bungee cords when strapping down a briefcase for a ride to work, or soft luggage when using the bike for touring duty.

This is a fun bike to ride. I found myself just weaving back and forth and when accelerating away from a stop, it was hard to resist that extra little twist of the throttle that would point the front skyward.

With an MSRP of $6,599, the street-friendly FZ6 costs $1,500 less than the track-loving YZF-R6 and most will find it a lot more practical to own.

For more information: www.yamaha-motor.com

James Hesketh writes about motorcycles for Wheels & Waves. He can be e-mailed at [email protected].
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
155 Posts
Proc said:
Well padded seat? What's that guy smoking? :spank
My guess is he spent no more than 20 minutes on the bike. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
360 Posts
it is correct, "well padded"

Unfortunately it's padded with ROCKS!. Thick padding does not equal cushy, but that's what butt buffers are for.
 

·
Sportbike.net junkie
Joined
·
1,242 Posts
it was hard to resist that extra little twist of the throttle that would point the front skyward.


WTF??? It doesnt wheelie that easy!!! I do throttle wheelies in 1st but come on!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
kdk1899 said:
it was hard to resist that extra little twist of the throttle that would point the front skyward.


WTF??? It doesnt wheelie that easy!!! I do throttle wheelies in 1st but come on!!
If you get the revs and weight balance just right and weigh about 215lbs it comes up at 8,000rpm quite easliy in 2nd gear.

I darn near pooped my pants the first time I done it, showing off as usual pulling away from a gas station.

Held it at 8,000 in 2nd and then just whacked the throttle open and up she came.

Way too squidly I know, however, at least I now know what not to do in future:dunno

Skippy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
317 Posts
In defense of his seat statement, he had just come off of riding and R1 all morning. I am sure the FZ6 seat, as uncomfortable as it might be for protracted riding, is still way better than the R1's seat. I don't really mind the seat too much, myself. I haven't spent more than a few hours on it in one go, though.

As for getting the front skyward, I still haven't attempted that. I have felt the front end get plenty light, and I know I have lifted it a few inches when I am taking off at WOT. But I am still leary of doing throttle wheelies... not to mention clutching it up. Yikes. I want to, but I am a giant chicken.

-J
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top