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Discussion Starter #1
i'm looking to buy a street beater so i can relegate my cbr to purely recreational purposes (track and twisties). my main concern is ease of maintenance. obviously, i will be getting a naked bike. what i want to know is, which bike is easier to maintain? an inline-4 or a v-twin? seems like the answer would be a v-twin, because it has half the number of cylinders and stuff. but instead of working with only one cylinder bank, you have to deal with two for the v-twin. so which exactly would be easier for maintenance? thanks! the cbr is tired of commuting...
 

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#1 Gear Nazi
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As far as a beater commuter bike, I say get an older V-Twin. The torque will make around town riding alot more tolerable. As far as maintenance goes, I don't think either bike will be easier to work on, but whatever you do get one that has good maintenance records and has been taken care of. Also if you don't have a car I suggest getting a little commuter car to get around, alot easier than a bike.
 

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a twin is better for riding around town on. an inline 4 would be a little smoother on the highway. i think inline 4s are easier to work on since you only have one cover to check the valves and timing. so then you only need one gasket to replace and deal with instead of 2. and normally things are set up like AIRBOX-CARBS-ENGINE-EXHAUST in a linear fashion. like if you want to take the headers off, they are all at the front instead of one pipe in the front of the engine and one at the back.

it's a personal preference thing really. since you already have an I4, get a twin.
 

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second chimp in space
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I haven't worked on v-twins much, but I don't think the difference would be that radical. Most of the time the major part of the job is getting to the part in question, and neither setup has an inherent advantage over the other in every case. Valves might be easier on an inline engine, but you can tune a carb on a Harley in 15 minutes.

The biggest factor in ease of maintenance will probably be the specific model. Can you get at the spark plugs without taking the tank off? How easy are the carbs to get out? Valve cover? Does it have a center stand? Lubing the chain is easier if it does. Just look up the maintenance schedule in your cbr's manual and when you go look at bikes see how easy it would be to perform those tasks on that bike.

The worst thing is that the bikes that are easier to work on are the older ones, which will break more. I say get a newish one in good condition and you can probably get away with not doing much to it.

As for engine config, get one you'll like riding. You'll spend a lot more time doing that than wrenching on it. Hopefully.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
enos said:
I haven't worked on v-twins much, but I don't think the difference would be that radical. Most of the time the major part of the job is getting to the part in question, and neither setup has an inherent advantage over the other in every case. Valves might be easier on an inline engine, but you can tune a carb on a Harley in 15 minutes.

The biggest factor in ease of maintenance will probably be the specific model. Can you get at the spark plugs without taking the tank off? How easy are the carbs to get out? Valve cover? Does it have a center stand? Lubing the chain is easier if it does. Just look up the maintenance schedule in your cbr's manual and when you go look at bikes see how easy it would be to perform those tasks on that bike.

The worst thing is that the bikes that are easier to work on are the older ones, which will break more. I say get a newish one in good condition and you can probably get away with not doing much to it.

As for engine config, get one you'll like riding. You'll spend a lot more time doing that than wrenching on it. Hopefully.
lets say SV1000S vs FZ-1 vs Super Hawk vs Buell XB12R

fz-1 is the only I-4 of the bunch, has a centerstand, and looks like it was made for easy engine access. superhawk is like the SV, only has twin side mounted radiators which may get in the way. the Buell is belt drive instead of chain, which is a big plus. which one is the best from an easy to maintain standpoint? looks to me like fz-1 vs buell, what do you guys think? so centerstand-ed I-4 vs belt-driven V-twin. which one? :p

oh, and i don't care which engine config for riding. they all have a full liter, and that's plenty for me as i've been riding a 600, and will only be commuting. as long as it's got 2 wheels!
 

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get an sv650.

it's easier to work than a 4 cyl bike because it's not as tightly packed under there. On an inlike 4 space it as premium and it's hard to work on it.
(i had a yzf600 before and sv1000s now).
Even with my b***** 1000cc engine, I can change the plugs is 30 min. Oil is 15 min job (only because it drains slow). How many new inline 4 riders can say the same?

oh and one more thing. It you have to sync the carbs, it's a piece of cake on twin. And takes much longer on inline-4 (also from experience).
 

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RLPoloArgyleSweaters,Son!
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Maybe it's just me but I hate the gas fumes, they make me sick. Well whats sweet about FZR's there dummy tanks(plastic with metal tank within) allow you to take the tank off and never disconnect fuel lines! It's awesome when you synch carbs not to have to use a auxilary tank; all I need is a 3 foot stool to set the tank on! Plus I like the easy to get to everything. Cbr's aren't high maintance either which would save from even doing it! GSXR's are lots of little parts and you better take pictures as you go if you want to reconnect everything right(just my personal experience)! I'm Yamaha biased of course...
 

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the reply about buell reminded me something.
i test rode xb12r (mechanics are the same as xb12s).
1. The belt it cool, no maintainance.
2. No coolant to change.
3. The dealer mechanic that I rode with said that valves are hydraulic, so no adjustments.
4. It even has only one brake caliper on front, less pads to change than other sportbikes.

So is there any maintainance buell needs?
 
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