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Discussion Starter #1
So after owning these for well over a year, I picked a nasty weather day to install them. It was not as difficult as I thought, with one exception that I will get into during the writeup.

Here is the final result.
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
For those unfamiliar with LSLs, they are sliders that require you to drill the fairings in order to install them. Here in this picture, you can see how one of the sliders is assembled: allen bolt, billet aluminum 'spacer', aluminum mushroom (gloss black part where my thumb is), delrin crash pad insert (matte black part where my index finger is).

These are supposedly designed so that you can just replace the delrin inserts if you crash.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I did not take pics of each step, but the first step was to remove the left hand fairing (left-hand as if you are sitting on the bike). The next thing that needed to be removed is the stock coolant tank.

A couple of things about these steps:

  • For the phillips head screws on the fairing, use the screwdriver that came with the stock tool kit. As I have mentioned in other threads, the screw heads are an unusual pitch and you can round them off easily if you do not.

  • The stock coolant tank obscures the engine bolt, so it has to be removed. Now the LSL kit comes with a new coolant tank, but I liked the R&G solution better - it has a 'donut' hole so you can access the engine bolt. You can order it separately from vendors that carry R&G sliders.
Check out the relatively wimpy coolant tank LSL bundles with their kit (the white box!). Tiny eh?

Now in the second pic, look at the stock coolant bottle, and the R&G. Near identical in shape and size save for the 'donut' in the R&G one.

Third pic is the new bottle, already mounted. You will reuse the gasket and cap from the stock coolant bottle on the new R&G one.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
In the pic above, you can see the removed engine bolt. Only remove one side at a time. If you are careful with the removal and install of the new coolant bottle, you won't spill a drop.

Now what I did not get a pic of is that at the back of the engine there is a nut, and the engine block is cast to hold the nut to prevent it from turning. For whatever reason, I had a very difficult time getting the new bolt to thread onto the nut. I took the nut out (be careful and don't drop it!), and threaded it on - no problem, but trying to get it all back together was a pain.

At any rate, I digress. With the stock bolt removed, I painted the head with latex house paint, inserted it into the hole it came from, then reinstalled the fairing. Press the bolt against the fairing, and you will have a dab of paint on the inside.

On the opposite side (outside) of the fairing, I used painters tape to tape off about a 8" block where I was going to drill. I was told this keeps the job 'cleaner', and it worked great for me.

Drill a pilot hole in the dead center of the paint dab, from the inside of the fairing out. Once through, reinstall the fairing and ensure the hole is in the correct place. Very important step!

If you are off, you can drill another pilot hole. If you use the hole saw and cut in the wrong place you are hosed...

Mine was good, so I installed a 1 1/4" bi-metal hole saw on the arbor, and using the pilot hole I drilled roughly a 32mm hole. I did the same for each side.

These pics show my handiwork. Not bad if I say so myself. The edge of the cut is very smooth, but the pic does not really show that. The black you see in the pic is the foam from the inside of the fairing.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
So now using the instructions included, I assembled the frame slider assembly. The larger of the two aluminum spacers goes on the left side, but that would be apparent if you tried to assemble it any other way.

Tighten the allen head bolt until it will not turn anymore. If it keeps turning and does not tighten, check that nut I mentioned earlier. I had a heck of a time with that left side one.

Once it is tight, move to the other side and repeat the process:

  • Remove fairing
  • Remove engine bolt
  • Paint bolt head
  • Reinstall fairing
  • Mark inside of fairing with paint from bolt head
  • Tape outside of fairing in drill/cut area
  • Drill pilot hole
  • Check alignment by reinstalling fairing
  • Cut fairing with hole saw
  • Install fairing
  • Install frame slider assembly
  • Tighten to spec
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
For what it is worth, the crash pads I have are the old school style ones. The person I bought the kit from got it a good while back but like me never got around to installing it. If you order today, you can get the new style crash pads. Not sure if they work any differently, but I do know they are interchangeable.

You can get colors for the old or new style.

New style in first pic (not sure what type of bike they are installed on), old in second (what I have installed):
 

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Looking good Ray! It's about time you got those things installed. Looks like everything went great with the install.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
As I was getting into the shower a few minutes ago to clean up from the job, the wife asked what I had been doing. I explained to her 'a man's job is not done until he has bragged to someone that he did it'. She rolled her eyes on that one! :eek:nfloor

Here are a couple more beauty shots.
 

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Ray I can see the expression on her face as she roles her eyes. It's kind of funny how our wives tolerate us.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
One thing to note about putting a set of these on a faired bike - unlike the R&G sliders, if you plan to take the fairings off you have to remove the frame sliders, or cut b***** holes which would be obvious to anyone if you did. A small issue since I rarely remove the fairings, but it could be a big one if you feel you need to remove the fairings.
 

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One thing to note about putting a set of these on a faired bike - unlike the R&G sliders, if you plan to take the fairings off you have to remove the frame sliders, or cut b***** holes which would be obvious to anyone if you did. A small issue since I rarely remove the fairings, but it could be a big one if you feel you need to remove the fairings.
while i dont find those sliders as asthetically pleasing as other makes, they look waaay less likely to flip a bike. My zzr is going to be seeing some race day duty so i just have to decide how willing i am going to be to pull that bolt out every time i need to swap fairings. great writeup tho.

EDIT: stupid question, so its 1 super long bolt that goes all the way into the frame and replaces the engine mount bolt? I would think in a crash it would bend that long bolt and destroy your fairings.....
 

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Discussion Starter #13
It is a super long bolt that goes to the engine. I believe this is the way most frame sliders worth the money will mount, so I don't think the LSLs are different in that respect. GSG and R&Gs have a similar setup. The bolt slides through a billet aluminum sleeve that the crash 'pad' sits on. I know the R&Gs use aluminum sleeves too, but they are not as substantial.

The bolt are supposed to bend, rather than shear, to help absorb the damage. I hope I never have to find out.

As far as the bolt busting the plastics - the hole I cut in this case was 32mm. The instructions called for 35mm. The puck hides the holes you cut. My way seems to work.

In a crash I think the plastics will be damaged either way, but they are cheap compared to the insurance totaling your bike. I think you have more to fear from the road grinding the plastics as opposed to the bolt busting anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for the writeup - I have a set of the new style on the way for my S1000RR (which fortunately don't require the fairings cut). Do they include torque settings for installation, or just say "refer to your service manual"?

KeS
I don't recall. I used the German method 'goodentite!' I need to get a set of sockets with hex heads so I can use my torque wrench for this sort of thing.
 

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My freestyle ingenuity sliders had bolts to replace the engine mount bolts. but were recessed into the slider and closer the the frame itself. After my crash They still bent the slightest bit and because my fairing holes were cut snug around the slider, the small bend busted my fairing to pieces. If only I had cut it another 1/4 inch b***** I would not have lost the fairing.
 

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I don't recall. I used the German method 'goodentite!' I need to get a set of sockets with hex heads so I can use my torque wrench for this sort of thing.
Got and installed mine, and they *did* come with torque settings. Very nice and look great with the S1000RR; no pics needed here in the Kawasaki forums. Thanks for the help.

KeS
 

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I would recommend using a anti-seize compound on the engine bolt, had to replace one of the recessed engine mount nut in my Install. I noticed you had the same problem, struggled with that nut as well.. I had someone else thread the bolt in while i made sure the nut lined up correctly.
 

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Do you think the LSL's protrude far enough away from the fairing to protect from a tip over or slow low side? Nice write up, probably going with these myself.
 

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Do you think the LSL's protrude far enough away from the fairing to protect from a tip over or slow low side? Nice write up, probably going with these myself.
For sure. Only thing i Don't like the LSL's on is the newer kawi's like the 636 or zx10r. The engine mounts are farther forward on those bikes, So the LSL's don't provide the protection they should provide. On our bikes the Engine mount is more centered with the chassis... so they work well.
 
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