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Discussion Starter #1
Anybody out there racing this year that could us some help? Not looking to make any money. Just want to get involved with a teem that could help me gain some experiance. I am willl to pay my own way. All am asking is to be involved in a team. You don't have to be a big profestional team. I'm will to help anybody that's at the track racing. I have a lot of expeiance with tools.
I am hoping to be racing myself in a year or so and anything I could do to help you this year will help me in the future. Any help would be great.
Thanks, Kevin
 

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Roadracer since '96
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I have found over they years that WHO you Know is so much more important than WHAT you know, I have a great example of this. I have been a very mechanically inclined, curious person my entire life and have worked on many different things without any direction as to how ahead of time. I have road raced motorcycles since '96, I'm a certified Tool & Die Maker, and I have the ability to adapt to most any situation.

Thru racing I met a now good freind who races Buells and works for Harley Davidson. Thru him I met Road Racing World writer Dave Swartz at Barber Motorsports Park last season in '04. This spring, during Bike Week 2005 at Daytona, I raced the CCS races kicking off Bike Week. After I was done racing for the event I had planned on just hanging out for the week and enjoying the whole Bike Week experience. Instead I ended up with an opportunity that most people who strive for this type of experience will only dream about. Dave's boss is the main man at Road Racing World magazine ( John Ulrich ) and is also in charge of the AMA Pro Racing / Formula USA M4 Suzuki Team. Dave remembered me revalving the forks on my bike at Barber last season and presented me with an opportunity to possibly work on the M4 Suzuki Team as a crew member for the entire week all the way thru the Daytona 200 the next weekend. I accepted the offer, worked hard during that entire week, learned alot of stuff that was invaluable, met and saw alot of famous people and racers (including Kevin Swantz, Jamie James, Michael Jordan, alot of the AMA Pro racers, Greg White from Two Wheel Tuesday, and the list goes on), and walked away from that experience feeling glad that I did it.

Though I can't hook you up with anyone, I will suggest trying to get involved with the most dedicated/successful racer or team that you can find at what ever level your looking at. Learning to do stuff incorrectly from the start is probably one of the biggest mistakes new racers make and can lead to some long standing issues with their racing for years after that. Learning the correct things to do from the start will be incredibly valuable. I would also try and 'network' with as many racers at the track that you can and develop relationships with them (motorcycle road racers are generally great people). This is what will probably turn out to be your best opportunity to get involved with a successful racer or team. Let the successful racers know that your looking to learn about the inner workings of the sport to make you a better racer once you start and would be willing to do what ever they need just to have an opportunity to learn. This may including running tires over to be changed, making lunch for the team, or busy work at the start, but if you show your capable they will let you do more and more as time goes by. My experience at Daytona progressed very rapidly the 1st 2 days and I was working on the racers bikes after I proved my capability to do exactly what I was told to do. Remember that the racer is literally putting his life in your hands, that was a different kind of stress than I was use to, usually it was my own bike I always worked on. Triple check your work, be overly organized, and don't hide something you messed up (fess up to a mistake and don't risk the racers safety).

Good luck in your search! :)
 

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GSXR RACER MIKE said:
I have found over they years that WHO you Know is so much more important than WHAT you know, I have a great example of this. I have been a very mechanically inclined, curious person my entire life and have worked on many different things without any direction as to how ahead of time. I have road raced motorcycles since '96, I'm a certified Tool & Die Maker, and I have the ability to adapt to most any situation.

Thru racing I met a now good freind who races Buells and works for Harley Davidson. Thru him I met Road Racing World writer Dave Swartz at Barber Motorsports Park last season in '04. This spring, during Bike Week 2005 at Daytona, I raced the CCS races kicking off Bike Week. After I was done racing for the event I had planned on just hanging out for the week and enjoying the whole Bike Week experience. Instead I ended up with an opportunity that most people who strive for this type of experience will only dream about. Dave's boss is the main man at Road Racing World magazine ( John Ulrich ) and is also in charge of the AMA Pro Racing / Formula USA M4 Suzuki Team. Dave remembered me revalving the forks on my bike at Barber last season and presented me with an opportunity to possibly work on the M4 Suzuki Team as a crew member for the entire week all the way thru the Daytona 200 the next weekend. I accepted the offer, worked hard during that entire week, learned alot of stuff that was invaluable, met and saw alot of famous people and racers (including Kevin Swantz, Jamie James, Michael Jordan, alot of the AMA Pro racers, Greg White from Two Wheel Tuesday, and the list goes on), and walked away from that experience feeling glad that I did it.

Though I can't hook you up with anyone, I will suggest trying to get involved with the most dedicated/successful racer or team that you can find at what ever level your looking at. Learning to do stuff incorrectly from the start is probably one of the biggest mistakes new racers make and can lead to some long standing issues with their racing for years after that. Learning the correct things to do from the start will be incredibly valuable. I would also try and 'network' with as many racers at the track that you can and develop relationships with them (motorcycle road racers are generally great people). This is what will probably turn out to be your best opportunity to get involved with a successful racer or team. Let the successful racers know that your looking to learn about the inner workings of the sport to make you a better racer once you start and would be willing to do what ever they need just to have an opportunity to learn. This may including running tires over to be changed, making lunch for the team, or busy work at the start, but if you show your capable they will let you do more and more as time goes by. My experience at Daytona progressed very rapidly the 1st 2 days and I was working on the racers bikes after I proved my capability to do exactly what I was told to do. Remember that the racer is literally putting his life in your hands, that was a different kind of stress than I was use to, usually it was my own bike I always worked on. Triple check your work, be overly organized, and don't hide something you messed up (fess up to a mistake and don't risk the racers safety).

Good luck in your search! :)
Great advice!!
 
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