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I just put the 3 wire lockheart phillips arrow lights on my 600 rr. They look great but they get really hot. Is that normal? I thought maybe because the light body is so small. Maybe I have it wired wrong. I have the colored (blue or green depending on side) honda wire connected to the red light wire. I have the solid orange wire connected to the black with white stripe arrow light wire and I have the orange with white stripe wire connected connected to the solid black arrow light wire. I tried connecting the striped wires together but the lights don't blink right.
 

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King of Oilernation
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Seems right. I would imagine the smaller case will generate more heat.
 

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Usually if it gets really hot that means it's wired wrong. It's hard to tell by the description, so I would suggest trying every wiring scenario possible(should be 9 combos since it's 3 wires) and try to find the one that blinks right without it getting hot. I know when I did my old CB750 if the wiring was wronf the blinkers got really hot and actually melted the casing on one(fortunatly I had extra's). I think usually when it gets hot the power is connected to the ground or something like that. If you can't find another combo that works, and it's not melting the case, then I guess it's alright. Just keep an eye on it, you don't want an electrical fire because of a blinker.
 

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I recently put some dual filliment flush mounts on my bike. I noticed they were getting warm while checking before final install. If you are using 3 wire (dual filliment), make sure the running light is dim while the blinker light is brighter. If the running light is using the brighter filliment it will get very hot! Also check to see if the ground and hot wire are connected properly. the light will work with reversed wiring, but my directions warned of hot perating temps when wired as such.
 

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Use a volt meter if you have if you dont get one they are cheap.
1.There should be a ground check continuity
2.One wire will pulse flash and will read on the meter jumping up and down and that will be your turn signal
3.There will be a constant wire that will read 12 volts + that will be your running lights
 
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