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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, so I'm finally making the bump up to A group, and getting my race license this spring (not sure yet on the license date, depends on when licensing is offerred).

With that said, I'm also making the jump to full on race tires. I have loved my Q2s, but I feel as if I'm pushing them for my skill level (I know they can take more than I'm giving them, but I don't have the skill level to control them well enough to get that out of them). I can easily spin up the rear, and I want a stickier tire for trail braking, so race tires HERE I COME!

What do you guys run and what opinions do you have of them? I currently have a set of the 211 GPAs, because I'm used to Dunlop and know how they give feedback. But, before committing to something for long term use, I want to know your opinions. What is the best race tire for price and longevity purposes? Additionally, what kind of feedback do you get from some? I hear pirellis don't give much feedback before washing out, but I've never run Pirelli race tires (or anything more than sport touring, that is).

The three I'm mostly considering are the GPAs, R10s, and Power Pures.
 

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I've been using Bridgestone slicks. They're cheap and they last (plus they offer contingency for some classes, if you race those classes). I used Pirellis the year before, and found similar results. The plus side to the Pirellis is that they were DOTs, so I could sell the take offs.

I might switch to R10's this year for that reason. I haven't ordered tires yet...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
For CMRA, I'm 99% certain I have to have DOTs for superstock.

I like the R10s, seem cheap and good from what I hear, everyone down here runs dunlops though.
 

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...everyone down here runs dunlops though.
Ironic you say that because I've never raced on anything other than Dunlop's and I have somewhere in the range of 20,000 racing miles. :)
 

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In the NE, it seems like every brand is well represented. I think a lot of guys on b***** bikes are really digging the NTEC's, and they make a nice tire. But in my blind eyes of LW bikes, Dunlops aren't super-popular. That said, they do have a few fast guys using them. I've been torn between the USA NTEC slicks and R10's for this season. I've heard good things about the NTEC's and my bike's not legal for any DOT classes, so I can run what I want.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ironic you say that because I've never raced on anything other than Dunlop's and I have somewhere in the range of 20,000 racing miles. :)
Well, that's not a lot of miles mister :scooby I'm guessing you like the dunlops

In the NE, it seems like every brand is well represented. I think a lot of guys on b***** bikes are really digging the NTEC's, and they make a nice tire. But in my blind eyes of LW bikes, Dunlops aren't super-popular. That said, they do have a few fast guys using them. I've been torn between the USA NTEC slicks and R10's for this season. I've heard good things about the NTEC's and my bike's not legal for any DOT classes, so I can run what I want.
I'm leaning towards the NTECs but they're pricey. I'll see how the take offs I have are
 

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I run Pirelli Supercorsas (SC2's, generally). They have a slightly softer carcas than some other makes which and they flex a fair amount. This lets them squirm around a little bit in some places but they grip outstandingly well and they're very predictable.

This seems to be a good combination for riders that are starting to learn how to really push a tire's traction limits.
 

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Well, that's not a lot of miles mister :scooby I'm guessing you like the dunlops
In that 20,000 miles I only had 1 crash ever due to a loss of traction and that was my fault because the tire was way past spent before I even started that race. But..I will also admit that I've always had a really good sense of traction so that plays into my limited crash experience as well.

I've always liked the traction feedback from the Dunlop's I've used, for that reason my devotion to them was always from the "Don't fix it if it ain't broke" point of view.
 

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I like the Dunlop 211GPA. I’m sure I could go just as fast on the Pirelli’s but the amount of movement and ‘noise’ that movement created was too much of a distraction. The 211 front is stiffer and very very quite until you put a lot of lean angle into it and it transmits that ‘feel’ into a clear signal. That signal lets me know when I’m not working, when I am and when I’m about to exceed its limit.

The rear is not as communicative as the Pirelli but the traction limit is higher and it slides more progressively than the Pirelli. It just slides out instead of snapping like the Supercorsa. Part of that may be suspension though.

Which brings up a good point. Just as, if not more, important that tires is suspension. The money spent getting the suspension re-valved and rebuilt will be savings down the road in tires that last longer and have better wear characteristics. If you haven’t sent your suspension out yet now is the time to do so. It’s going to get pretty busy soon and you don’t want to be left with your pants down.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the input.

Good point on the suspension. Thankfully my roommate is a very very good mechanic (he broke down a transmission, found the problem, and reassembled at the track in a total of about 2 hours). Hopefully he can help me with at least tuning it up. I don't think there's anything he doesn't know. I'd normally send it off, but doing this on a college budget blows.

I think I'll try these 211s, even though they're just take offs. See how I like them. Obviously, they'll be better than the Q2s I've been on, but I'm willing to experiment a bit and see what I can go fastest on :) When I move up to the NE for law school, I've gotta be fast enough to not embarass myself in front of Mister Oreo here! :majoreact
 

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I run Pirelli Supercorsas (SC2's, generally). They have a slightly softer carcas than some other makes which and they flex a fair amount. This lets them squirm around a little bit in some places but they grip outstandingly well and they're very predictable.

This seems to be a good combination for riders that are starting to learn how to really push a tire's traction limits.
+1

I've tried Bridgestone DOT's before... Disliked them. They always seemed to move around, never fully stuck to the ground. Never really seemed to warm up.

I like the Conti DOT's better then the B-Stones. The Conti's seemed to do well.
 

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Bridgestones require attention to suspension set-up.
My teammate runs Bridgestone slicks & does alright on em. Enough to win a pair of expert championships :)
 

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Thankfully my roommate is a very very good mechanic (he broke down a transmission, found the problem, and reassembled at the track in a total of about 2 hours). Hopefully he can help me with at least tuning it up. I don't think there's anything he doesn't know. I'd normally send it off, but doing this on a college budget blows.
Can I pit with ya'll?

For CMRA, I'm 99% certain I have to have DOTs for superstock.
You are correct, from the rulebook:

m) Tires must be in good condition as determined by the Technical Inspector. In Superstock classes DOT-approved tires must be used.


What bike will you be running? I ran a 1st Gen SV650 with BT003RS the past two years. This year I will be on a GSXR 600. Not sure what tires I am going with either.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Can I pit with ya'll?
Sure! I'm not sure when I'll be getting licensed because of graduation issues, but it will be this summer at the latest.


You are correct, from the rulebook:

m) Tires must be in good condition as determined by the Technical Inspector. In Superstock classes DOT-approved tires must be used.


What bike will you be running? I ran a 1st Gen SV650 with BT003RS the past two years. This year I will be on a GSXR 600. Not sure what tires I am going with either.
I'll be on a 2006 Kawasaki ZX-6R. This will be my first season racing. I'll be at MSRH next weekend with ridesmart in level 2 on saturday and 3 on sunday.
 

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Thanks for the input.

Good point on the suspension. Thankfully my roommate is a very very good mechanic (he broke down a transmission, found the problem, and reassembled at the track in a total of about 2 hours). Hopefully he can help me with at least tuning it up. I don't think there's anything he doesn't know. I'd normally send it off, but doing this on a college budget blows.

I think I'll try these 211s, even though they're just take offs. See how I like them. Obviously, they'll be better than the Q2s I've been on, but I'm willing to experiment a bit and see what I can go fastest on :) When I move up to the NE for law school, I've gotta be fast enough to not embarass myself in front of Mister Oreo here! :majoreact
well...
being a good mechanic is handy but a bit more is needed when dealing with suspension. a good mechanic can install a jet kit or a power commander but without the equipment or experience has no way to tune it. suspension is the same. anyone with a vise and a wrench set can remove and reinstall a shock. it takes the specialized tools and experience of a suspension expert to tune the shock and get the most out of it. just about anything you tell them regarding how the bike is handling they have heard before and can help sort out the issues.

if you're just looking at new springs and setting sag that can be handled by you with the help of a few friends. there is plenty of instruction on how to install springs, front and rear, and set sag. if you are looking to go beyond that, valves, aftermarket suspension etc, spend the money and have a suspension tuner do the work.

it seems like a bit of cash up front but it pays off in the long run. a better handling bike is a lot more fun to ride. good suspension helps tires last longer as well. most good tuners stand by their customer's and are willing to help fine tune things at little or no cost.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
well...
being a good mechanic is handy but a bit more is needed when dealing with suspension. a good mechanic can install a jet kit or a power commander but without the equipment or experience has no way to tune it. suspension is the same. anyone with a vise and a wrench set can remove and reinstall a shock. it takes the specialized tools and experience of a suspension expert to tune the shock and get the most out of it. just about anything you tell them regarding how the bike is handling they have heard before and can help sort out the issues.

if you're just looking at new springs and setting sag that can be handled by you with the help of a few friends. there is plenty of instruction on how to install springs, front and rear, and set sag. if you are looking to go beyond that, valves, aftermarket suspension etc, spend the money and have a suspension tuner do the work.

it seems like a bit of cash up front but it pays off in the long run. a better handling bike is a lot more fun to ride. good suspension helps tires last longer as well. most good tuners stand by their customer's and are willing to help fine tune things at little or no cost.
Good point, we are just going to respring it. I can't afford all new suspension stuff until I'm done with school (which is still 4 years out from now haha).
 
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