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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So if anyone motorcycles in LA, how much time do you save commuting through heavy rush hour, where it's bumper to bumper like the entire way.

I was in traffic for so long, but I saw so many bikes just zip by from far away and then were way ahead of me after they passed me. If I had to commute that horrible LA traffic for the rest of my life by car, I'd rather take my chances with a motorcycle spend less of my life waiting in traffic. If say I get home 3 times faster, then after x amount of years, the bike would have paid itself off in time not spent in traffic. So even if I died in 10 years riding the bike, it would have paid itself off because I would have spent less time out of traffic vs someone who is 60-70 yrs old and commutes by car. So assume I got a bike when I was 18 years old and started working with a 50 mile commute in the LA area, I could have done more things that did not involve waiting in traffic by the time I'm 30 years old than someone who is 60 years old and only commuted by car waiting in horrible traffic their whole life since they were 18.

I really want to know in one's lifetime, how long do they need to survive on the motorcycle for it to pay itself off time wise not waiting in traffic in a car.

I hate how a 40-50 mile drive takes 3 hours by car if the traffic is horrible. I can't stand traffic and I resent it so much especially when there is a solution.
The only better solution than motorcycle would be commuting by helicopter. There's no traffic in the sky.

I don't understand why people can't consider switching to motorcycle, I heard some number like if only 13% of car drivers rode motorcycle that we would not have the horrible LA traffic known today. Is the safety really worth sitting in traffic for the rest of your life, having less time to be where you want to be?
 

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1) My commute home by car - 7 miles - ranges from 15 minutes on a good day, to 65 minutes in West LA traffic hell.

2) My commute home by bike - 7 miles - is about 13-14 minutes in moderate to heavy traffic.

3) Stop analyzing so much. Ride or don't. Shit or get off the pot. Life's too short to worry about ifs, buts, and pleasing people who don't matter.
 

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20 minutes either way for me, but if I had an $80,000 car I am sure I could cut it down to 15 min.
 

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Mexican Hard Shell Taco
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Well, here it takes at least twice as much time to commute in a car vs. a bike, but sometimes it can be up to three times as much time. Can't really tell you any numbers as I haven't owned a car in the last 4 years.
 

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18 miles to/from work. The Toll Road tacks on an additional 6 miles each way if I choose to take it when I cage it (which I usually do when I absolutely have to drive)

Morning commute by car in traffic - 35-45 mins sometimes a full hour if it's a particularly nasty day.
morning commute by car on toll roads - 30 mins
morning commute by bike - 20 mins

Afternoon commute by car in traffic - 1 hour on an easy day, 1:20-1:30 on a nasty day
Afternoon commute by car on toll roads - 30-40 mins depending on how many idiots wait until the last minute to jump the east bound toll.
Afternoon Commute by bike - 25 mins

That's commuting on the 57->5 from Anaheim to Irvine and back every day. For me it's a no brainer just for the pure and simple fact that my truck gets 18 mpg and the bike gets 36, but cutting off almost an hour in the afternoon makes a big difference too. I have time to get home, make dinner and eat at a decent hour after work.
 

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A much better option would be to leave the steaming shithole of a state of California altogether.
You clearly don't know what you're talking about. You live in fucking Owings Mills. You can't talk shit on this beautiful state with the best riding roads in the country, glorious beaches, and ridiculously gorgeous girls. Nope. Not happening.

Also, you're the same fool that said a S1000RR isn't any different than a GSX-R1000. Yeah. No.
 

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Depends on traffic speed, your speed, distance, road conditions ect.

I used to think the time saved would be big but it isnt...and im average speed or more when splitting. It does make it the opposite of boring though.
You clearly don't know what you're talking about. You live in fucking Owings Mills. You can't talk shit on this beautiful state with the best riding roads in the country, glorious beaches, and ridiculously gorgeous girls. Nope. Not happening.

Also, you're the same fool that said a S1000RR isn't any different than a GSX-R1000. Yeah. No.
Amen.
 

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Btw motorcycles are dangerous and kill. Thats why people wisely prefer cars or trucks. If you feel safe in a car in california youre sure to get hurt on a motorcycle. You dont save money either. In theory, maybe but not with a sportsbike and practice. All in all most break even if that compared to the cost of a car.


Youre creating a lot of new threads here as if youre trying to find a reason to start motorcycling. Sorry to break it to you but youre going to quit and lose money from selling your bike and gear. If you wanna be real, go make friends through your normal channels because youre just going to be a statistic (statistically speaking)
 

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Mexican Hard Shell Taco
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FFS I didn't check who the OP is...


Why bother with a bike? Ask daddy to buy you a condo near... college? You don't even commute FFS!
 

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A much better option would be to leave the steaming shithole of a state of California altogether.

Horse crap.


I live in motorcycle heaven, street and dirt, 15 minutes from two different rivers and 3 different lakes, and one hour from mnt's to snow ski in the winter.

Major city 30 min away. Outdoors and forest, 30 min away.

:santafinger
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Btw motorcycles are dangerous and kill. Thats why people wisely prefer cars or trucks. If you feel safe in a car in california youre sure to get hurt on a motorcycle. You dont save money either. In theory, maybe but not with a sportsbike and practice. All in all most break even if that compared to the cost of a car.


Youre creating a lot of new threads here as if youre trying to find a reason to start motorcycling. Sorry to break it to you but youre going to quit and lose money from selling your bike and gear. If you wanna be real, go make friends through your normal channels because youre just going to be a statistic (statistically speaking)
I have already ridden a bike on public roads. So it's not like I'm imagining anything, I know what riding feels like. It is the reason why I am working so hard to get a new job so I can move out and have my bike.
 

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A guy on a scruffy bike
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I split lanes daily in SoCal for about 25 years (before I escaped the state last year). I quit bothering to own a car at all in CA back in 1988. The only things I really miss about CA are lanesplitting and good cheap Mexican food.

I was mostly in the San Diego area, although also spent a fair bit of time in LA, up near Santa Barbara, and trips to the Bay Area.

How much money you save with regard to your time depends of course on what your time is worth. 12 of those years I was a freelance consulting engineer, and on days where I had multiple clients to see, being on the bike instead of the car would typically save me between 30 and 60 minutes in a day -- time I could be at the client's being useful and getting paid.

My Ducati paid for itself 4 times over this way -- during those 12 years, I made an extra $40K by being with customers instead of between them, and that's just the paid time -- not counting the time saved to and from home, since I didn't get paid for that time savings.

As for costs of running a bike itself, sportbikes are some of the more expensive bikes to run, and you won't save cash riding a sportbike compared to an economy car. But an economy bike (say, Ninja 250) is cheaper to run than even a very cheap car, and a sportbike is a lot cheaper to run than a fancy sports or luxury car, so if you compare apples to apples, bikes are cheaper regardless of the misinformation running around out there.

Meanwhile, although lanesplitting on a bike is clearly more risky than driving a car, it is *not* more risky than riding a bike without lanesplitting. So once you have decent fine motor skills on the bike and can control its placement precisely, if you're on the bike anyway there's no rational reason not to split lanes any time there's enough room to fit.

PhilB
 

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Just to add to what Phil said, splitting lanes requires a lot more attention to vehicles (anticipating their moves) and being able to react (keep calm) in moments like that video. It's a matter of adapting to the environment, be it at the track or wide open texas roads, or nyc. Being on a bike means you should be a fast learner, whatever environment you put youself in.
 

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Driving and riding on California streets and highways is a privilege, not a right. Lane splitting is no exception. Don't be an ass and you'll be OK. Act like its your personal race track, and suffer the fate of not having an ambulance on stand by like a race track. And sometimes, shit happens when you're just stopped at a red light, stop sign, going the speed limit around a blind turn, or just going down the street (left turner). I've known people to die from each of those, and they did nothing wrong. It's unfortunately very common.
 

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Lane-splitting doesn't shorten commute time so much as it normalizes it. If the traffic is flowing smoothly at 70 or even 45mph, I'm not splitting lanes anyway. It's when traffic grinds to a halt or stop-and-go for miles on end that I'm saving vast chunks of time by keeping moving, even at the 30mph or so that is the max I split stopped traffic at.

Meanwhile, although lanesplitting on a bike is clearly more risky than driving a car, it is *not* more risky than riding a bike without lanesplitting. So once you have decent fine motor skills on the bike and can control its placement precisely, if you're on the bike anyway there's no rational reason not to split lanes any time there's enough room to fit.
I don't agree with this. It is clearly safer to be sitting in an established (car behind/beside you recognizes you are there) space in stop-and-go traffic than to jump out between lanes and start splitting. That I can't provide a statistic on the additional risk because my sample size is too small (I haven't crashed doing either), doesn't make that untrue. You might as well say that sleeping on the double yellow line is as safe as sleeping at home in bed because you haven't died doing either yet.

KeS
 

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A guy on a scruffy bike
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Lane-splitting doesn't shorten commute time so much as it normalizes it. If the traffic is flowing smoothly at 70 or even 45mph, I'm not splitting lanes anyway. It's when traffic grinds to a halt or stop-and-go for miles on end that I'm saving vast chunks of time by keeping moving, even at the 30mph or so that is the max I split stopped traffic at.
The CHP guideline is to not split if traffic is going about 35mph or faster. I agree with that; splitting at high speeds is more dangerous AND less useful, you don't save much time if traffic is moving anyhow.

I don't agree with this. It is clearly safer to be sitting in an established (car behind/beside you recognizes you are there) space in stop-and-go traffic than to jump out between lanes and start splitting. That I can't provide a statistic on the additional risk because my sample size is too small (I haven't crashed doing either), doesn't make that untrue. You might as well say that sleeping on the double yellow line is as safe as sleeping at home in bed because you haven't died doing either yet.

KeS
I very much believe that splitting is significantly safer in bumper-to-bumper stop-and-go situations. It's not at all "clearly safer" to be sandwiched between two cars waiting for the guy behind you to rearend you. The CHP supports rational lanesplitting *because* it is safer. When traffic is moving slowly, but moving, the safety advantage is less clear, but I still think it is there, until traffic is going 35 or 40 or so (depending also on lane width, weather, etc., of course).

PhilB
 
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