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Lance started making his run for his historic 7th Tour De france

Lance Armstrong is less than a month away from being a former pro, but the 33-year-old Texan plans to make the 92nd Tour de France a three-week rolling retirement party on two wheels.

It will be fun for him and his legion of rabid fans, but nothing short of anguish for his unfortunate rivals left gasping in his wake.

"When I roll down the start ramp on July 2 my intention will be to win that day and win overall," Armstrong said, firing a warning shot to those who thought he'd gone soft after winning a record sixth Tour de France last summer.

"I'm excited about the race. I feel very good on the bike," Armstrong added. "And I would even venture to say that I feel better than I've ever felt."

As if the cycling world expected anything else from the man who's rewritten the history books with his laser focus, his uncompromising will and insurmountable strength in cycling's hardest race.

For six Julys in a row, Armstrong has reigned supreme on the twisting French roads, plowing over the Alps like they were mere speed bumps on his headlong sprint to fame, fortune, celebrity and a unique place in sports history.

Armstrong, the Tour de France's most decorated rider, already has one foot out the door.

Without the commitment of training and racing 10 months of the year, he'll have more time for the Lance Armstrong Foundation, more time to work closely with his top-flight cadre of sponsors and more time to spend with his children.

First there's some unfinished business: Winning a seventh Tour de France since his triumphant return from cancer in 1999, and riding into the sunset, legacy untarnished.

"It's time to move on and he's excited about the next chapter of his life. He's focused on ending his career on a high note," said Bill Stapleton, Armstrong's longtime agent and lawyer. "For him, there's nothing to get nostalgic about until the job's done."

Armstrong said he won't pine for the long, hard days of training or the pressure cooker of being the eternal favorite. He certainly won't miss the hassles that come with being cycling's king and the sometimes murky accusations of performance-enhancing doping.

"When you're constantly on the top, you have a bull's-eye on your back," Armstrong said to The Associated Press. "The target just gets b***** and b***** and b*****. It's easier to shoot at, it's easier to throw things at. It might stick, it might not stick. You have to live with that. It comes with the territory."

For Armstrong, this race is more about him and the legacy he'll leave behind in the sport he's transformed in his six-year rule.

"The big difference in winning a seventh against a sixth or even a fifth is that there was a lot of buildup with five; 'Can he get the record, join the elite club?' Seven for me is more of a personal goal," he said. "I always wanted to win one final Tour and retire."
 

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Can't believe hes going for 7. Why not though, nobody can touch him.
 

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I can't believe that it's only stage 4 and he already has the yellow jersey. I wonder if a lot of the other riders, especially guys like Jan Ulrich, ever wonder if it's just hopeless.
 

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Well he lost the yellow jersey after the last stage, but only once has he been in 1st place at this stage in the race, I am willing to bet in the Alps he pulls through with the lead again.
 
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