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Discussion Starter #1
I went today and got my new Maxxis installed on the front of my 03' 600RR. My 208 was getting pretty wore out, but it still ran very smooth. It only had one small weight on the wheel to balance it, maybe 3/4" long.

After the guy at the shop was done with the install/balance of my new Maxxis....there were 4 big weights on the wheel. Is it common to need that much weight? Could the tire be defetive? I took the bike out on a deserted stretch of highway to see if the tire was balanced (the only way I knew how) and ran the bike up to around 100. Right around 102 the front end started to vibrate really bad....I'm assuming that the tire is not properly balanced.

What do you guys think? Bad Tire? Bad balance job?
 

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Wow. I've never seen that. That cannot be right. If it's wobbling it's not blanced right. I'd take it somewhere else. I can never find a place that can balance correctly.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What do most shops use to balance tires? This shop just had a static balancer....a shaft going through the center of the wheel with a set of rollers on each side.

The heavy side of the wheel would rotate to the bottom and they would put the weights on the opposite side. Seems pretty low tech for a tire that might me sped up to 150+ mph at the track. Is that how much shops do it?
 

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Theres no I in threesome
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Automotive shops usually have a computer controlled balancer that calculates the exact weights needed in the exact spots they are needed. I would hope some larger motorcycle shops would have a similar system.
 

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Combat Marshmellow
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static balancer is all we use at the track - but that amount of weight seems a lil excessive....
 

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Autobots! Roll Out!
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I work in an automotive shop, and that's not an excessive amount of weight, just an excessive number of weights. It's odd that it's at the valve stem, that's usually the lightest part of the rim. There is a good chance you've bent that wheel tho, from potholes, etc, and they're trying to balance it out. Could always get it rebalanced tho, takes someone less then a minute to balance a tire.
 

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that ain't right. if it needs that much weight, somthings amiss. i agree with Truck, that's a wierd spot for weights also. i wonder if it was a new guy balancing it.
 

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When i got my front wheel back from getting new rubber it had a good bit of weight, so I asked the dude, he said it looked like someone had used the Fix-A-Flat stuff at some point, probably twice! I was thinking, who the heck would use that stuff on a bike. He said it balanced fine, and I have had no problems with it. I will try to clean it out at the next change.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'm sure that the rim is ok. With the only tire, it only took 1 small little weight..and it ran nice and smooth.
 

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you need to take it back to your shop and have them rebalance and have the tire turned on the rim 180 degrees that should eliminate your balance issue
 

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Most tires have a colored dot on the sidewall that marks the heavy spot on the tire. When it is mounted, they should line this dot up with the valve stem which is the lightest spot on the wheel. Did they do this? If not, it could explain why they needed more weight to balance it. I agree with the others here. I'd have the tire rotated on the rim and rebalanced.
 

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Spin the tire 180% on the rim. I'll bet it will knock it down to around a 1/4 or 1/2 once. I balance all my tires with a Handy industries static balancer... I've seen this a couple of times.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well I took it back and they got it down to 1.5 onces to balance the tire. Is that acceptable or is that to much weight? I ran the bike up way past 100 and I don't feel any vibration.
 

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The internet is a lot of bad advice. FIRST OF ALL, the mark on your tire is the 'light spot' of the tire, not the heavy spot, SECOND, the valve stem is usually assumed to be the heavy spot of the wheel. Take your tires to a dealer, and they assume this and line up the light spot (yellow circle on your tire (see your pic) on the tire with the heavy spot (valve stem on the wheel). This is there starting point, assuming the valve stem (heavy spot) and tire mark (light spot) will factor some of the balancing out. The weights therefore usually end up opposite the valve stem, but not always. It is rare however, the weights were on the valve stem side!!! - To do a good balance job, you should first balance the wheel with no tire, mark the heavy spot of the wheel with soap stone or chalk, then line up the yellow dot on the tire with this true heavy spot. Did my friends last week like this and needed no weights to balance the tire. - Most shop equipment is actually less accurate than a manual balancer. - Remember, if you don't want to balance the wheel, VALVE STEM IS USUALLY HEAVY, YELLOW DOT IS THE LIGHT SPOT OF THE TIRE.
 

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The point is still valid. Line the dot up with the valve stem and you have a good starting point.
 
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