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Saratogian
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I,m pretty sure inverted forks come from the race bikes to stop the fork flexing.
From what I have read normal forks will flex under extreme braking because of the smaller tubes at the top and the front wheel has been known to touch the radiator on race bikes,inverting them puts the thicker part at the top making them much harder to flex,then it just filtered down to performance street bikes,no real need on the street I dont think.
This is "trail braking," right? The trail is reduced due to fork flex (and compression?), which effectively shortens the wheelbase and allows the bike to turn in quicker - or that's how it was explained to me at the track on Monday.
 

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This is "trail braking," right? The trail is reduced due to fork flex (and compression?), which effectively shortens the wheelbase and allows the bike to turn in quicker - or that's how it was explained to me at the track on Monday.
Trail braking is keeping your brakes on well into the corner well after you would normally let off.
 

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Saratogian
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This is "trail braking," right? The trail is reduced due to fork flex (and compression?), which effectively shortens the wheelbase and allows the bike to turn in quicker - or that's how it was explained to me at the track on Monday.
yes all of that is correct but there is more to it.

Actually it's either brake and most pros use the front.
This is also a great practice [asset] on the street (read: twisties).

You don't have to be using a ton of brake at the edge of traction to be trail braking. If i'm running a set of twisties smoothly, and all of the sudden not needing to use ANY front brake as I enter a particular turn (in order to maintain my pace), I feel that I have set my initial corner entry speed too low. Sometimes I'm only using 5% that fades to 0%, but the front is still engaged and the feedback is there.

Additionally, being on the brakes from pre-turn-in all the way to throttle puts you in a much better position to SMOOTHLY apply more significant braking if need be. Braking, releasing the brake completely, and laying the bike into a turn with zero brake or throttle is a good way to push the front because the bike won't want to change directions as easily AND leaves the rider feeling disconnected.

EDIT - for what it's worth, because I know there is a lot of BS on the net, my experience with trail braking comes from reading about what Freddie Spencer and some of the other pros teach, talking about it with track coaches, first applying it on the track, and then carrying it over to the street. I'm no pro or anything like that :lao and people do have their own opinions....nonetheless, the benefits of proper trail braking are real.

Just don't go out and trail brake through an oily ass intersection :bitchslap
 

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yes all of that is correct but there is more to it.



This is also a great practice on the street (read: twisties).

You don't have to be using a ton of brake at the edge of traction to be trail braking. If i'm running a set of twisties smoothly, and all of the sudden not needing to use ANY front brake as I enter a particular turn (in order to maintain my pace), I feel that I have set my initial corner entry speed too low. Sometimes I'm only using 5% that fades to 0%, but the front is still engaged and the feedback is there.

Additionally, being on the brakes from pre-turn-in all the way to throttle puts you in a much better position to SMOOTHLY apply more significant braking if need be. Braking, releasing the brake completely, and laying the bike into a turn with zero brake or throttle is a good way to push the front because the bike won't want to change directions as easily AND leaves the rider feeling disconnected.

EDIT - for what it's worth, because I know there is a lot of BS on the net, my experience with trail braking comes from reading about what Freddie Spencer and some of the other pros teach, talking about it with track coaches, first applying it on the track, and then carrying it over to the street. I'm no pro or anything like that :lao and people do have their own opinions....nonetheless, the benefits of proper trail braking are real.

Just don't go out and trail brake through an oily ass intersection :bitchslap
Also I don't recommend any new or experience rider that has never had real training try practicing this on the street. It's a quick way to fall down if you don't know what you are doing.
 

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Saratogian
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Also I don't recommend any new or experience rider that has never had real training try practicing this on the street. It's a quick way to fall down if you don't know what you are doing.
Yeah, some people will argue "learn it right from the beginning" and some will say "it's an advanced skill". I think it's simply something to strive for and grow into....but I also believe it makes you a smoother, safer, more controlled rider in the end.
 

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I know what inverted forks are, but why are they desirable? Im not being sarcastic, just being a noob. I really would like to know.
Thanks.
inverted forks are desired because they are more durable. especially if your intentions are wheelies. the seals dont blow out as much and they just last longer.
 
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