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Where's my bike???
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I read this on a forum that's local to me. Seems like a pretty good idea!

FW: ICE and Your Cell Phone

In case of emergency ICE

Paramedics will turn to a victim's cell phone for clues to that person's identity. You can make their job much easier with a simple idea that they are trying to get everyone to adopt: ICE.

ICE stands for In Case of Emergency. If you add an entry in the contacts list in your cell phone under ICE, with the name and phone no. of the person that the emergency services should call on your behalf, you can save

them a lot of time and have your loved ones contacted quickly. It only takes a few moments of your time to do.

Paramedics know what ICE means and they look for it immediately. ICE your cell phone NOW!

Please pass this one along...
 

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I keep the majority of my phone features locked, including the phone book, since people seem to enjoy pilfering through my phone. This is definately a good idea for those that don't lock up the phone, though, and I guess the rest of us should have that stuff in our wallets.
 

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Official SBN Party Pooper
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I have a laminated 3x5 card that I have typed up with all my contact info. I keep one in my jacket and one in the trunk of the bike.
 

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This has been brought up before, but a better idea than the ICE on your phone is to keep a card with your license that has your contact information, medical problem, allergies, etc on it. I am a career paramedic and I can tell you that your cell phone is the last thing I'm going to worry about if you can't answer the questions for me yourself. Besides the obvious problem of not knowing if it's really your phone. It would suck for your parents to get a call that goes like this:
Hospital: "Hi, this is the hospital. Do you have a son?"
Parent: "Yes, is he okay?"
Hospital: "Well, he's been involved in a crash and he's hurt pretty badly."
Parent: "Oh my God."
Right around that time the son walks in the door of the house and says hi to mom and dad and realizes his phone was in his friends car. His friend is really the one who was in the crash.

Cell phones just don't allow us to ID the person involved, so they can't be relied on. Keep an ID card with your wallet. If I want to know who you are, that's where I'm going to look. And since most licenses (if not all) are photo ID's, I can positively identify you and the hospital con notify the proper people.
Not to mention that the contact information will help the hospital more than anyone else anyway. If you're not able to answer questions for me about what happened, I"m going to be doing other stuff that's probably far more important than trying to find a phone number to call.
Shane
 

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From back in da' day
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I agree with Shane, the phone can become dislodged in an accident and become a random object in the scene. It is easier to just keep an emergency card in your wallet or pocketbook WITH your photo ID.
 

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You got that right.
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Rascus said:
I have a laminated 3x5 card that I have typed up with all my contact info. I keep one in my jacket and one in the trunk of the bike.
Ditto, but only in my pillon compartment though. I included my physician's name and number and also my blood type. Printed it on some neon-pink paper so it would stand out in the event of a big wreck.
 

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Hey Mike,
Just a suggestion. The information on the card is great, but in a wreck we won't look in the pillon of your bike for any information. That's up to the police officers if they feel so inclined during their accident investigation. By the time they get to that, you should be at the hospital already or at the very least on your way. In a major trauma, we strive for an "on-scene" time of less than 10 minutes. There's a lot of stuff to be done that quickly, and going through your stuff isn't one of them. Keep the card in your wallet where it will be found by the people who are going to need the information. Just a suggestion.
Shane
 

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seems like a decent idea to me
 

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medic001918 said:
Hey Mike,
Just a suggestion. The information on the card is great, but in a wreck we won't look in the pillon of your bike for any information. That's up to the police officers if they feel so inclined during their accident investigation. By the time they get to that, you should be at the hospital already or at the very least on your way. In a major trauma, we strive for an "on-scene" time of less than 10 minutes. There's a lot of stuff to be done that quickly, and going through your stuff isn't one of them. Keep the card in your wallet where it will be found by the people who are going to need the information. Just a suggestion.
Shane
Cool. I'll make a couple of extras, put one in my wallet, one in each of my jackets just for redundancy sake.
 

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MT Wallet said:
To be honest, as a journalist this ice thing sounds like an urban legend.

thats what i was thinking.... especially because the only times ive heard of it are- on here and in a forwarded email.... hhhhhhmmmm :scratches head
 

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The 'ICE' idea was originally from a British Paramedic http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/4667193.stm and just seemed to catch on. I actually think it's a good idea but as someone has already pointed out, an accident site is probably 'messy' and the phone may not be anywhere near its 'owner'.

But, I've read of other ideas about carrying a card, having your blood group on your helmet and such like...but you may have borrowed the jacket/helmet etc so I'm not sure there is a foolproof method of carrying this sort of info apart from a tattoo or an implant or a dogtag.

Also, I don't know what the situation is in the US but over here anything like your blood group on your helmet is ignored by the medical staff until they test your blood group (ie. might not be your lid).
 

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I have a donor card with contact info on it.....just in case!
 

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hanglowejohnson said:
thats what i was thinking.... especially because the only times ive heard of it are- on here and in a forwarded email.... hhhhhhmmmm :scratches head
The concept still stands though. Good idea in case you're out and they need to contact next of kin.
 

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I typed up a card that goes like this and had it laminated..then I attached it with a zip tie to my inside pocket zipper in my jacket. Also keep a copy in my helmet just in case they miss the first one.

EMERGENCY INFO CARD

DO NOT REMOVE HELMET!!!!
ALLOW EMT’s to do so!!

Rider: Joe B. Smoe
DOB: 5/12/63
Address: 1111 A Street
Denver, CO 80013
Height: 6ft Weight: 155lbs
Emergency Contacts:
Susan Smoe (spouse) 303-555-1212
Carol Smoe (mom home) 303-111-1111
(mom cell) 303-222-2222
Bob Smoe (dad cell) 303-333-3333
Blood Type: O Positive
No Known Drug Allergies (NKDA)

Medical Insurance:
Blue Cross
ID# 555827941
Acct # 8874
Blue Cross Phone:
1-800-222-1234
 
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