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what's up bitches
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Well i just wanted to find some stuff out. Im literally NEW to the motorcycle scene. When i realized that having a bike may become reality for me, i got all into it and i found out about the MSF course and so forth. Im planning on signing up but im not sure how long the wait is, how many hours and stuff. But anyways, i just had a couple simple questions.

For a bike:
How do you "go"? Simply. For a car, it would be, a) Turn the ignition b) press gas and put into gear c) push accelerator... But for a bike.... i don't get the concept. Where's the clutch located at? All i know (from video games and arcades and stuff) is that the right hand handle is the throttle. (I get that :D) and there's a gear shifter that you click up and down with your thumb. And there's also a front brake and a rear brake on each handlebar.... and if you hit the front brake too hard, it'll lock up and swing the bike and cause you to crash or whatever. So my question is... what are the steps for riding a bike. a) start the engine b).... IM lost. Maybe push with your feet to get the bike moving, give it gas with it in gear, and let go of the clutch? That's my guess......

Also, if you get go of the clutch too fast, what happens? I mean in a car, you would stall... or peel out or jerk really hard. But for a bike what happens?

AND FINALLY..... how do you pop a wheelie?! I always wondered this.. I'm not saying im going to attempt this but im curious. Do you have to lift the bike up with your arms and lean back like how you would do in a regular bicycle? Or is there a method, like dumping the clutch and doing something... Well those are my questions, thanks
 

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You clutch with the left lever.
Throttle is like you said on the right handle bar, where you roll it.
The shifter is located on your left foot lever the gears are like this ---->

6
5
4
3
2
neutral
1


Press down on it to go down gears and push up to go up gears.
Neutral is between first and second gear, and you can get to neutral by slightly pressing it down and slightly pushing it up.

Front brake is on the right hand lever, and you always SQUEEZE and not GRAB.

To turn on the engine, you turn the key to ON position and press the start button. But make sure its in neutral or you are squeezing the left hand lever which is same as nuetral.

You wouldn't want to try letting go of the clutch too fast, because you will either stall it and drop it or wheelie it uncontrollably (If you have a fast bike.)

Wheeling techniques can be found on the stunt forum in this site.

AND take the MSF, it's fun and gain some experience.
 

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^^^^^ what he said. And the rear brake is controlled by your right foot. And yes, do take the MSF course. It'll teach you more than any friend, or book, or video will ever be able to. Good luck and happy riding
 

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#1 Gear Nazi
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They will teach you EVERYTHING you asked in the MSF course you take. They will literally teach you how to ride.
 

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+1 for taking the MSF.. if you know how to drive stick it'll help you a lot.
 

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Welcome to the community.
 

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what's up bitches
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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks everyone~ This forum helped me out a lot even just reading the threads. Well thanks for explaining heyboy. I always thought the clutch was on the left side where you put your foot. So i was wondering how in the world you use your foot and hand at the same time. :D Well thanks for the help, i'll be looking into the MSF course and hopefully the course is only like 1-2 days long so i can complete it on a weekend. Otherwise it's gonna be hard to take during the semester.

Couple more questions :
1) What does it mean "Squeeze" not "Grab"? Isn't that the same thing?
2) Also, when you're stopping.. like regularly. Say you're going and you come to a red light. Do you use the rear brake or front brake. I don't think you would use the front brake by itself..... but how do you know how much of each to use? That's it. Thanks!
 

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welcome aboard, and definitly take the msf course you will not regret it one bit, it should be on a weekend if it's done like they do it around here.

Stopping, use the front brake don't worry about the rear too much, they will teach you in the msf course.
 

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Superstuddc27 said:
Thanks everyone~ This forum helped me out a lot even just reading the threads. Well thanks for explaining heyboy. I always thought the clutch was on the left side where you put your foot. So i was wondering how in the world you use your foot and hand at the same time. :D Well thanks for the help, i'll be looking into the MSF course and hopefully the course is only like 1-2 days long so i can complete it on a weekend. Otherwise it's gonna be hard to take during the semester.

Couple more questions :
1) What does it mean "Squeeze" not "Grab"? Isn't that the same thing?
2) Also, when you're stopping.. like regularly. Say you're going and you come to a red light. Do you use the rear brake or front brake. I don't think you would use the front brake by itself..... but how do you know how much of each to use? That's it. Thanks!
Squeeze means to apply more gradually than full force all at once. Like in a car you apply the brake with increasing pressure when stopping from higher speeds.

Front brake has about 70% of the stopping power, so you use it all the time. Some use front only. Some use a combination of front and rear. Rear by itself isn't usually a good idea.

It takes a whole different set of coordinated hand/foot operations to control a m/c compared to a car. Steering is way different as well, plus you always have the only two wheels balance and traction things to worry about.

Start with the MSF which in CA is usally a Firday evening, Saturday and Sunday. Sign up soon as there is usually a long wait (you might ask about "standby").

Here's an overview of m/c controls:
http://www.dps.state.mn.us/dvs/DLTraining/mom/chap4.htm
 

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RayOSV said:
Front brake has about 70% of the stopping power, so you use it all the time. Some use front only. Some use a combination of front and rear. Rear by itself isn't usually a good idea.
Actually, and correct me if I'm wrong, but low speed maneuvers call for rear braking only generally.
 

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read all the above and then reread them engage your brain and get to MSF course..keep brain engaged and ride it like u stole it...hehehehehe after u learn how to ride that is
 

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Hagios said:
Actually, and correct me if I'm wrong, but low speed maneuvers call for rear braking only generally.
Sounds like your talking about trail-braking, not exactly something a newbie needs to worry about at this point.
 

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firefighter81 said:
Sounds like your talking about trail-braking, not exactly something a newbie needs to worry about at this point.
no, he is correct. if you are doing a U-turn in the parking lot, you can use the rear brake to stabilize and control your speed. if you use the front in the middle of a tight, low-speed turn, it throws off your balance.

BTW, that 70% front brake # is for old, heavy bikes. The new sportbikes have the overwhelming percentage of stopping power from their front brakes...estimates of 90%-100% are common. I still use both, but you can do just fine using only the front brake to stop the bike.

the MSF will teach you everything you need to know to start riding safely.
 

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70% would be a low figure. Even today, the figure for front braking is still in the 70-80% ranges. The rear brake provides 20-30% of your total braking force. If the rear brake was useless or provided so little force (as you state), there would be no point in fitting it.
 

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f4igrad said:
no, he is correct. if you are doing a U-turn in the parking lot, you can use the rear brake to stabilize and control your speed. if you use the front in the middle of a tight, low-speed turn, it throws off your balance.

BTW, that 70% front brake # is for old, heavy bikes. The new sportbikes have the overwhelming percentage of stopping power from their front brakes...estimates of 90%-100% are common. I still use both, but you can do just fine using only the front brake to stop the bike.

the MSF will teach you everything you need to know to start riding safely.
but you'll do better stopping w/ both..............;)
 

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Hagios said:
Actually, and correct me if I'm wrong, but low speed maneuvers call for rear braking only generally.
You're right that some situations call for rear brake. Sharp turns while going downhill come to mind. And yes, too much front brake in slow, tight turns can throw things off.

Learning how to be light with the front brake will serve you well as will learning when the rear is appropriate.
 

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i always use both out of habit, but the one time I had to brake near maximum (stupid cager!) the rear lifted off the ground...putting me into a rolling stoppie. At that point, the rear brake was pretty useless. Is this bad braking technique or just the result of the front brake doing most of the work?
 

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f4igrad said:
i always use both out of habit, but the one time I had to brake near maximum (stupid cager!) the rear lifted off the ground...putting me into a rolling stoppie. At that point, the rear brake was pretty useless. Is this bad braking technique or just the result of the front brake doing most of the work?
bad braking, shoulda put your weight on the rear of the bike.......when the rear lifts, you then have to change you concentration to make sure you don't flip over.......taking "x"% of concentration from braking and using for ant-flipping....let alone having to let of the ft, so as to not flip over.


IMO, no proof, i think the most stopping is the ft at max, and the rear locked up skidding or near skidding.......
 

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on a short wheelbase sportbike, wouldn't the front brake at the max create a stoppie, even if you try to get your weight back? if you are at maximum braking, it is REALLY hard to move back on the bike since your momentum is carrying you forward. I can understand on a cruiser how it is easier to apply the rear because it is hard as hell to stoppie a long wheelbase cruiser. Plus, the design of the bike isn't oriented towards placing weight on the front.
 
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