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Discussion Starter #1
Here is my situation. I have a 89 Honda Hawk, which is a naked sport bike. Do fairings and windscreen help all that much when it comes to the wind? This is the only bike that I have ever ridden, so I don't know what the rest feel like.

Also, explain this to me.

I live in Northern California, There are lots of hills, and with lots of hill comes lots of wind, usually. I was riding my bike this morning just staying with the flow of traffic at about 55-60mph and my bike is getting tossed all over the lane by the wind. I'm praying the whole time, hoping that I don't lose it and also slowing down at the same time hoping that the extreme gusts of wind will subside. Then all of a sudden this guy on a Harley goes flying by me like nothing. I'm thinkin' what the crap?!!! How is it that this guy is not even phased by the wind. Could it be that the extra weight of his bike and the fact that he was probably a much more seasoned rider than I make that much of a difference? Please help, I'm baffled by this!!!
 

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He was thinking as he rode by you "I hope I can hang on long enough to impress this guy before my arms give out".

The wind has affected me on every bike I have owned. That includes HD's, Goldwings and sportbikes. We all hate the wind.
 

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when riding in wind it's important to relax. the more you ride, the better you will get at it. sometimes fairings help, but just as often they are just another surface to catch the wind.

who knows with the guy on the Harley. they have a low center of gravity, he could be someone who has ridden for years and the gusts don't faze him.
 

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Fairings only help with your aerodynamics, it won't help with cross-winds... it'll actually make things worse.

You can't do much about the cross-winds... just adjust your riding style and maintain control.

The Harley is much heavier than your bike, thus won't get "pushed" around by the wind as much. There are actually advantages to having a heavy bike.
 

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cross winds are worse with fairings it gives the wind a surface to push against you will get used to it in no time
 

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My first experience with wind was about to enter a slight curve to the right doing about 45 mph. Traffic was coming from the other way and just as I started into the curve, the wind just stood me straight up. Being as I was in the left side of my lane, that was also my first major "pucker", you might say. You get used to it and learn to compensate, and maybe "react" with the wind better.
 

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I'll add to the "be relaxed" part. Try to "plant" yourself on the bike using your lower body so that you can keep your upper body a little more loose. Put the balls of your feet on the pegs (not your arches) and slide your feet into the guards so that you can actually grip a little inwards with your feet. Grip the tank slightly with your knees. Now you're holding on to the bike with your lower body. Try to keep your upper body more relaxed so that it can "absorb" the wind gusts.

If you have a death grip on the bars, any motion of your arms will translate into a steering input. Relax your grip so that the gusts don't also create small turning forces. The other thing that I've noticed is that baggy, textile jackets make things worse. Tighter-fitting leathers help a lot with aerodynamics.

Practice riding up and down 680 until the gusts don't bother you any more. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the replys guys. As for riding on 680, I'm trying to stay off the freeway as much as I can right now. I do have my license, just in case your wondering. The rear sprocket and possible the front one have been modified from the stock one and don't make for very good freeway riding. The RPM's get over 5K and it redlines at 8.5K. I wish I had a 6th gear. The guy that owned if before me lived in San Francisco and used the bike for just getting around town. And if you have ever been there, you know that you don't really ever get up to freeway speeds. I have only owned the bike for a few months. I do plan on changing the sprockets (and chain) back to the stock ones.
 

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So, the former owner turned it into a city hill climber, huh?
 

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I want to go back to Monterey, CA, so I can go to San Fran and jump some of those hills :) Maybe next year...
 

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Yup, it's a city hill climber. It does it well too. This bike has tons of torque, since it is a V-Twin, but also has great peak power.

Also, today I rode the same part of road where it is really windy, I relaxed a little more, and I put the balls of my feet on my pegs and used my lower body to hold on to the bike more. It made a difference. It was still scary, but not nearly as scary. I will keep practicing this and hopefully I will be able to man-handle those winds!!!
 

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Gecko87 said:
Also, today I rode the same part of road where it is really windy, I relaxed a little more, and I put the balls of my feet on my pegs and used my lower body to hold on to the bike more. It made a difference. It was still scary, but not nearly as scary. I will keep practicing this and hopefully I will be able to man-handle those winds!!!
that's great news!
remember to be flexible & relaxed like the willow & the wind won't break you grasshopper :D

 

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Gecko87 said:
Yup, it's a city hill climber. It does it well too. This bike has tons of torque, since it is a V-Twin, but also has great peak power.

Also, today I rode the same part of road where it is really windy, I relaxed a little more, and I put the balls of my feet on my pegs and used my lower body to hold on to the bike more. It made a difference. It was still scary, but not nearly as scary. I will keep practicing this and hopefully I will be able to man-handle those winds!!!
Glad to hear that it's getting better. Like most things in life, practice makes perfect. With experience, you'll be less blown around by the wind as your body becomes less rigid. You'll also be better able to use lane positioning to create a buffer zone depending on which way the wind is blowing. Also watch out for riding past big trucks and over-passes. They block the wind for a few seconds then the blast quickly resumes when you get by them. You need to plan for it.
 
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