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The plug tips were all the same dark brown but this white chaulky stuff on Plug #1 was on the part of the plug outside the cylinder. Is that still a sign of excessive heat or other issues?
I did take her for a rip with the new plugs and everything is silky smooth and good acceleration too. Not sure if it is better than with the old plugs but probably is.
 

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I'll be finding out soon enough what you all are talking about. All I've done so far is just look at it and it doesn't seem too difficult from just seeing it but we will see what happens. My question is, do I HAVE to use the NGK CR9EK spark plug or are there other (prefferbly better) options out there. I would like to get a little more BANG for my buck if you know what I mean. Do they make the fork ended spark plugs for motorcycles that have the double spark like they do for cars? This is my first time doing it so I'm not sure. Any info would be helpful. Thanks.
 

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I'm not sure anything else makes a difference, to be honest. I used this write-up with those NGK's and was done in about 30 minutes. I've got tiny hands, so the toughest part wasn't getting in there, but getting the plug wires on and off. No leverage. Still, it was cake.
 

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I'll be finding out soon enough what you all are talking about. All I've done so far is just look at it and it doesn't seem too difficult from just seeing it but we will see what happens. My question is, do I HAVE to use the NGK CR9EK spark plug or are there other (prefferbly better) options out there. I would like to get a little more BANG for my buck if you know what I mean. Do they make the fork ended spark plugs for motorcycles that have the double spark like they do for cars? This is my first time doing it so I'm not sure. Any info would be helpful. Thanks.
The double spark is a marketing gimmick. The Iridium plugs are suppose to have a longer lifespan. That would be worth the extra money.
 

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I was trying to replace the spark plugs for a while, and reading this post gave me full confidence I will make it right :)
Great explanation, I did it in about 40 minutes.
Thank you!
 

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I agree with everyone else - great write up. Thanks for taking the time to put this together.

I'll add one bit of advice. I used this guide to the the job, and overall it went well. However, I did make one rather serious mistake. I failed to notice that the plugs I bought (NGK Iridium CR9EIX) have a cap on the end. See the picture I've included. This cap prevented the plug wire boot to re-seat on the plugs. It is unnecessary for the FZ6 (at least the 07 model). Only after taking one of the plugs back out did I see my mistake. The cap simply screws off.

Note: the plug in the picture is not a CR9EIX. I just used it to show the cap.

Cheers,
CJM

 

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The Angry Blue Mantis!
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I agree with everyone else - great write up. Thanks for taking the time to put this together.

I'll add one bit of advice. I used this guide to the the job, and overall it went well. However, I did make one rather serious mistake. I failed to notice that the plugs I bought (NGK Iridium CR9EIX) have a cap on the end. See the picture I've included. This cap prevented the plug wire boot to re-seat on the plugs. It is unnecessary for the FZ6 (at least the 07 model). Only after taking one of the plugs back out did I see my mistake. The cap simply screws off.

Note: the plug in the picture is not a CR9EIX. I just used it to show the cap.

Cheers,
CJM


Good post! I am about to do this install for the first time on my FZ6 at 12,000 miles.

Great writeup Jeep!
 

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so wait.. we dont need that end cap on teh plugs when changin them???
On my 07, the plug boot will not fit over that cap. When pushing the boot on with the cap removed, you feel/hear the satisfying clicks you expect as it seats properly.

I think the cap is for automotive applications.
 

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Indeed a very helpful writeup. I don't think Yamaha intended for anyone with large hands to ever change these things, LOL. It was a little tough but I worked it out. Had I not disconnected the radiator hose on the left side of the bike I would never have been able to get that #1 plug out
 

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The Angry Blue Mantis!
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Did this last weekend.

My tips: plugs 2-4 are easy. Plug #1 requires small, strong hands. I was able to get it loose using a screw driver as extra upward leverage to pop it loose, but that is the easy part. The tough part of plug #1 is getting the boot out...it wants to hit the air box, there is only one small gap between the air box and frame where it will go to provide the clearance you need to get it out without snapping it off! If you don't have small hands, find someone who does for getting to #1.
 

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Thanks Jeep.
Just did the change this morning. Took the old plugs out and they were clearly gone. The center electrode was worn badly. I agree with others here that the #1 plug lead is a real swine to remove. I don't have big hands but I ended up taking the lower rad bolt out and swinging it forward to get my other hand up past it to help out. The lead deffo fouls on the underside of the air box and the effort required to get the cap out the hole puts a lot of stress on the cap itself and the HT lead going into it to my mind. Sure don't fancy doing this twice a year so next time I will look at the idea of loosening or even removing the airbox. That must surely take less time to do than struggling with tired fingers for 30 mins for just that lead.
Still, it was an hour well spent and made me get in there and clean up the head some.
 

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Did this last weekend.

My tips: plugs 2-4 are easy. Plug #1 requires small, strong hands. I was able to get it loose using a screw driver as extra upward leverage to pop it loose, but that is the easy part. The tough part of plug #1 is getting the boot out...it wants to hit the air box, there is only one small gap between the air box and frame where it will go to provide the clearance you need to get it out without snapping it off! If you don't have small hands, find someone who does for getting to #1.

The best tip I've found in years was in an Haynes Manual.

Get a small length of plastic tubing about the length of the spark plug tool that is a tight push fit on the porcelain end of the plug, once you loosen the plug sufficiently you push the tubing over the end and undo it and pull it out from the well.

The best part comes when reinstalling, you put the tubing on the plug and you can easily feed it in and line it up with the hole. Do the plug up as much as you can by hand this way you can feel if it is cross threaded.

Once you feel it bottom, remove the tube and use the tool to tighten to the correct specification.

Cheers :)
 
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