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Ooh lawd!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm writing this guide with nice pictures to show folks (newbies like myself) how to change your front sprocket yourself. I hope a few of you will benefit from this guide. Thanks go to hybrid for some advice on disassembly and torque.

This was done to a Ducati SuperSport 800. Most new Ducati bikes come with 15 tooth (15T) front sprockets which are placed on the bike for emissions compliance. A 14T front sprocket (on this bike) is only $30-$50 and provides you with more low-end torque, smoother low speed pull, and does not require a new chain - the stock will work just fine.

The downsides are that your RPMs will go up slightly, and your top speed will drop slightly. If you're doing mostly street riding and stop-and-go commuting, the benefits far outweigh not being able to try to get to 130 MPH in heavy traffic. :lao

Going down one tooth on the front sprocket is similar to going up about two teeth on the rear.

Your bike may vary somewhat, but this is basically it.

The only concern someone may have is wheel alignment (when you adjust chain slack), but don't be afraid of it - it's only screws and bolts, really.
 

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Ooh lawd!
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
It's easiest to get to all these parts if you take off your rearsets and fairings. So, do that first.
 

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Ooh lawd!
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Now you can get to the sprocket cover. These required 5mm allen wrenches for me.

There will be a good bit of grime under there. Clean it out with some of your favorite cleaner.
 

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Ooh lawd!
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Next, take the sprocket o... argh -the clutch assembly is in the way.

Three 5mm bolts and yoink! Off it comes.

I did not remove it all the way - just enough to give me some room to get the sprocket and chain off.
 

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Ooh lawd!
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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Place the retainer back on - there's a small groove on the gear that the retainer fits into where you can spin it into place.

Turn the retainer to line it up with the sprocket holes and put the screws back in. Use a little bit of LockTite ($4 a tube at auto parts store) on the bolt to make sure it stays in.
 

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Ooh lawd!
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Now screw the sprocket cover back on, and put your rearsets and shift linkage screw back on the bike.

Voila! Now to adjust that chain - who wants to do that "How To"? :lao

Remember - 25mm is about the same as 1". Always check your manual for the optimal chain slack.
 

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nice DIY
 

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Ooh lawd!
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The two screws hold the retainer to the sprocket, but the retainer is in a groove on the gear.
 

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BIRDMAN
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As far as I know most bikes use one big nut right down the center. But more importantly...I've never seen such a clean bike! Except when they are brand new. Want to clean mine?
 

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Ooh lawd!
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
ApriliaSL said:
As far as I know most bikes use one big nut right down the center. But more importantly...I've never seen such a clean bike! Except when they are brand new. Want to clean mine?
Did you not see all the gunk under my sprocket cover! Would you let that kind of gunk lay around in your kitchen?

Yuck!

And I'm ashamed that you would let your Italian beauty get dirty.
 

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RESIDENT ASSHOLE
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how about you copy and paste the how to parts in my how to section?

Ill go ahead and make it a sticky..............yeeehaw! and lock it so no one can make stupid comments.
 

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Ooh lawd!
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
That'd be good. Can't I just make one edit (need to locktite the sprocket retainer bolts) and get a mod to move it over to that section?
 
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