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Not necessarily, but they do need some TLC

Check the rotors for a stamping that gives the minimum thickness. Measure the rotors and compare

If you have enough thickness, buy a drill mounted hone and just resurface them. Sand the pads, or replace if getting thin. Suggest a fluid flush while you are at it


 

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Human After All
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I did the fluid mid-winter when we had a few 60* days and I went for a few rides, and I have new pads coming in soon so I'll probably re-bleed them just to be safe.

I'll have to take a look at the rotors when I head outside in a bit, then. Thanks
 

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from that photo they still look to be thick enough to do the job. No cracking along the drilled holes?

if not, and if they are within minimum spec for thickness, hone em a bit (or, you can take the rotors to a good brake shop and they should be able to do the job for you, if you are worried about honeing a warp into them) and away you'll go.
 

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Honing is super easy, and way way better than a shop that would turn them on a lathe, which puts it's own grooves in. The best is blanchard ground, but I don't know where you'd find a place to do that

the hone puts a nice random finish on them, which is what you want
 

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can't say for certain from the photos, but they don't look like they have been over heated. If you're brakes are performing properly, check thickness, then hone, pads and go.
 

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Honing is super easy, and way way better than a shop that would turn them on a lathe, which puts it's own grooves in. The best is blanchard ground, but I don't know where you'd find a place to do that

the hone puts a nice random finish on them, which is what you want
What machinists do you go to? Cause while I won't disagree that a hone will do better, a lathe should not be putting visible groves into a brake rotor.
 

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Cheap Bastid
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Any symptoms of poor performance?

Look okay to me, minus a little extra pad depositing. I'd just take a sanding block to em & give em a rub in a cross hatching pattern.
 

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Human After All
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So hey uh... about those brakes. It would appear one or both of my calipers is seized. I got the bike in the air and the front wheel barely moves by hand and there's a scraping sound as it turns. It wasn't as noticeable with both wheels on the ground but now that I've clearly heard it I can't not hear it.

I really CBF right now to do more about it though. I don't have the money to replace anything else. I guess the bike gets parked for a while.
 

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the joke is in your hand
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What machinists do you go to? Cause while I won't disagree that a hone will do better, a lathe should not be putting visible groves into a brake rotor.
exactly. I'm in machinist school and if done right I can make it almost polished looking.
it depends on the tool and the speed of the lathe. as long as they know how to make the tool properly and use the correct rpm on the lathe and don't go crazy with the feed speed it can come out to be better than a cnc can make them.

here's some of the parts I made so far. this is aluminum but steel can come out even better looking.




Untitled by serpentracer03r6, on Flickr
 

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Cheap Bastid
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So hey uh... about those brakes. It would appear one or both of my calipers is seized. I got the bike in the air and the front wheel barely moves by hand and there's a scraping sound as it turns. It wasn't as noticeable with both wheels on the ground but now that I've clearly heard it I can't not hear it.

I really CBF right now to do more about it though. I don't have the money to replace anything else. I guess the bike gets parked for a while.
Pull off the calipers, scoop out the pads and take a look at the pistons. Squeeze the lever a couple times to push them out, but be careful not to go too far or they'll pop out. I'll make a mess and they're tricky to get back in (typically requires a C clamp).

Clean the surface of the pistons with some brake parts cleaner, a stiff brush and/or some very fine sand paper. Should free them up nicely.

Replace the piston seals and it'll be even better.
 

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the joke is in your hand
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So hey uh... about those brakes. It would appear one or both of my calipers is seized. I got the bike in the air and the front wheel barely moves by hand and there's a scraping sound as it turns. It wasn't as noticeable with both wheels on the ground but now that I've clearly heard it I can't not hear it.

I really CBF right now to do more about it though. I don't have the money to replace anything else. I guess the bike gets parked for a while.
most bike's don't move that easy turned by hand. you just need to take the calipers off and give the pistons and good cleaning.

find a block of wood about 1/2" thick and stick in between the pistons and pump the lever till they touch the block and hold it.
now clean them with a toothbrush and brake cleaner.
coat them with a light coating of caliper lube. use the wood and push the pistons back into the caliper. you'll have to work a little at a time on each side because it will want to push the other side back out a little.

this should fix the sticking problem. they're simply not retracting once you let go of the lever. nothing to buy other than brake cleaner and caliper lube.
 

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Human After All
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I couldn't get the bolts holding the calipers on to budge even with my electric impact wrench. And that thing can take the lugs off my Cherokee.
 

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Cheap Bastid
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Uhhhhh..... that's not good. There isn't a single good reason why those shouldn't come off with only a wrench and a little elbow grease.

Be liberal with the penetrating oil, conservative with the heat if necessary. Leftie loosie.
 

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Human After All
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
they've been on there since 2006.
2005, actually. I only have ~14k miles on the bike, it spent a lot of time in the garage not in use after I got hit by an SUV. Like, it didn't move, period, from 2010ish to the end of 2013, aside from being moved around out of the way in the garage. So it still has its original brakes.

Third set of tires though, counting the ones that came on it.
 

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the joke is in your hand
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that would also explain the sticking. I guess your garage gets a little humid or excess moisture. mine is connected to the house so it's somewhat climate controlled and things stay rust free.
 

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Human After All
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
It's a non-attached garage with no power and partially open to the elements due to neglect (before I bought the place. It's not very high on the list of things to take care of, unfortunately).

Also before 2010 it was parked outside
 

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A lathe is still machining circluar grooves. That's how it works. Those grooves may be almost microscopic but they are there

Lots of articles I've read over the years talk about it and how ideally they should be Blanchard ground


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