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How much does country of origin matter?

  • Country of origin is the most important factor

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Country of origin is not the most important factor, but it is very important to me

    Votes: 7 21.2%
  • Country of origin is a minor consideration, but it could potentially sway my decision

    Votes: 15 45.5%
  • Country of origin doesn't matter at all and would not influence my decision at all

    Votes: 11 33.3%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How much does country of origin matter to you in choosing a motorcycle? Does it play into your purchasing decision at all? Do you let country of origin influence your opinion of a motorcycle, either as an excuse to convince yourself the motorcycle is better due to the country of manufacture, or as a way to convince yourself a motorcycle isn't good enough due to the manufacturer country?

Whether it comes to sport bikes, adventure bikes, dual sports, or whatever, how much does country of origin play a factor in your decision making process?

Curious what people generally think about this, feel free to elaborate in your answers.
 

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It is a motorcycle stereotype when it comes to bikes and their country. I have heard that the japanese Big Four builds sport bikes for quantity while European makers build sport bikes for quality. Also, replacement parts and availability is another consideration should problems arise.
 

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Couldn't care less - whatever the best bike is for my money at the time, regardless of where it's built. Availability of service and parts is more important. Location of the dealership can also influence. But country or build means zip to me - and keep in mind bikes are built all over the place regardless of where the manufacturers home country is.
 

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the joke is in your hand
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8,594 Posts
parts availability is my #1 concern.

just like some people tell me triumph is easy to get parts for. but there is one brand new dealer in 100 miles of me. and they just opened up a few months ago and are not fully operational yet.

unlike the big 4. I can drive any direction and find a dealer within 20 miles. there are now 0 ducati dealers that i know of. the one suzuki place used to sell aprilia but not anymore. no ktm, no husqavarna (spelling?) and cincinnati is one of the biggest motorcycle cities in the usa. I think we're up near the top of the list of motorcycles per capita.
 

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Pretty much all the bikes that are available to me are of good build quality, so the brand isn't much of a consideration. If I think it's what I want, it doesn't matter if it's Kawasaki, Suzuki, BMW, Triumph, or KTM. I think I would proceed with caution if a bike was developed run by the Chinese just because of the horror stories I've heard about the awful build quality and/or blatant copying of other country's products. Maybe not all of their products are like that, but I'm not aware of one for sale here. That being said, if a motorcycle did come from there that got a lot of good reviews, and it fits my preferences, why not?
 

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I can pass this guy...
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Kansas City has a lot of different motorcycle dealerships. With-in 30 minutes I can get to any motorcycle brand I need. Well, minus MV Agusta. All the others as far as I know, I'm good.


And no, where the company of the motorcycle being purchased is not very important to me.
 

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Country of origin makes no difference to me. Just so happens to be that the bikes with engines in the types of bikes I'm finding myself preffering to ride (twins and V4s in sportbikes) come from Italy with the I3s of Triumph and MV being close thirds.
 

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My car preferences have carried over to motorcycles.

Japanese and German.

Doesn't mean I am not open to the idea of others but in my mind I really like those 2 because I know that they are very reliable in general and very well engineered.
 

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Live to ride
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Quality of product matters to me.
 

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Country of origin makes no difference to me. Just so happens to be that the bikes with engines in the types of bikes I'm finding myself preffering to ride (twins and V4s in sportbikes) come from Italy with the I3s of Triumph and MV being close thirds.
*cough*Honda Rc51*cough
 

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It should be called 'country of assembly' cos parts are sourced all over the globe. Factories even in 3rd world countries have workers that would put our fat and coddled workers to shame. The bikes are built to the manufacturer's specs no matter what the country of origin.
 

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A guy on a scruffy bike
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Country of origin doesn't matter to me in any philosopical way. In a practical sense, quality and technology are still better in first-world countries -- U.S., Japan, Europe -- with Korea still catching up, and other places not there yet.

I have found, from experience, that I do tend to like Italian stuff the best, but I wouldn't buy a bike just because it's Italian, or avoid one for not being.

Out of the 40+ bikes I test rode in the last few years, I tried a mulititude of things from all the major countries. In the end, my short list had 4 Italian bikes on it, plus 1 German one you can't get in the U.S., and 1 American bike they discontinued. (Ducati HyperMotard 1100, Ducati StreetFighter, MV Agusta Brutale, Moto-Guzzi Griso 8V, BMW K1300R, Buell 1125CR.) For my "budget" list, it wound up being 1 Italian, 1 British, 1 Japanese (Ducati HyperMotard 796, Triumph Street Triple R, Kawasaki Z1000).

PhilB
 

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It's good to B-King
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It is a motorcycle stereotype when it comes to bikes and their country. I have heard that the japanese Big Four builds sport bikes for quantity while European makers build sport bikes for quality. Also, replacement parts and availability is another consideration should problems arise.
Not true at all. Ducatis, KTMs, BMWs, etc all have their own share of problems.

The fit and finish on a Ducati or Beemer is higher, and they often (not always) use higher quality parts like forks.

Country of origin only matters to me in that I would not buy a Korean bike or a Chinese bike (too many problems, too low quality right now). The Jap, Euro, and American brands are all fine with me, and it comes down to if I like the bike, not where it was built.
 

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Mexican Hard Shell Taco
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5,894 Posts
I've sworn never to own a French car, don't care where it was made, built or assembled from a CKD. No PSA Peugeot Citroën, Renault S.A. or Nissan for me, never.

BUT, I own 2 French made Yamahas. The XT660R and XT660X are made by MBK, a French subsidiary of Yamaha, and they have Minarelli engines, another Yamaha subsidiary.

That being said, I don't give a damn about contry of origin. The two SVs and the XJR1300 were made in Japan, the two XTs were made in France and the RX-S 115 in Malaysia.
 

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Mexican Hard Shell Taco
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5,894 Posts
It is a motorcycle stereotype when it comes to bikes and their country. I have heard that the japanese Big Four builds sport bikes for quantity while European makers build sport bikes for quality. Also, replacement parts and availability is another consideration should problems arise.
Seriously, you screwed up and bought a POS bike, that doesn't mean all Japanese bikes are as crappy as your POS bike.

Unbunch your panties, get rid of that basketcase and buy another used bike... And if you don't know what you're doing (obvious) ask for help from someone that does.

Got this bike used, non running, and it has been trouble free!



But I KNEW what I was doing and what I was getting into. My first "big bike" was a 1991 Katana 750... What a POS, a total basketcase, I paid for being an overconfident newbie thinking that I knew what I was doing.
 

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I buy what ever the best quality that can be had for my money and the type of bike I like. I'll ride anything that will last......don't give a damn where it is made.
 

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CCS# 616
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It is a motorcycle stereotype when it comes to bikes and their country. I have heard that the japanese Big Four builds sport bikes for quantity while European makers build sport bikes for quality. Also, replacement parts and availability is another consideration should problems arise.
Wrong, they all build bikes to make money.
 
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