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Discussion Starter #1
i'm thinking about getting a second set of wheels/tires for my f4i for track days. i would like to be able to have an xtra set just in case. but i'd want to do it myself. any one know hard it is to remove/install wheels?
 

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Not very hard, but if you're not handy it might take a little while the first time. You'll probably want front/rear stands to make things much easier. With the rear wheel you'd have to adjust chain slack/alignment. And you need some 2*4's or something to rest the wheels on so there's no pressure on the discs or sprocket. Buy a service manual if you don't have one already.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
that's what i figured. i watched someone do it once and it took maybe like one minute to remove the rear!! plus it costs like $30 per wheel for a shop to do it.
 

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Its not hard at all, once you get used to it, you will be able to do both wheels in about 10 min.

The front tire is the easiest. depending on the bike, first take of your brake calipers(2 bolts each), then crack loose the main front axle bolt a bit, then loosen the 12mm bolts on the front of the forks( 2 on each fork right below the axle), then finish unscrewing the front axle bolt, hold the tire up with one hand, and pull the axle out.... your done with the front.

the back can be a bit tricky, but once you get used to it its not that bad. First crack the rear axle bolt loose, then back of the chain tensioning bolts. Take off the the rear bake calliper ( you can leave it on, but I think its a bit more easy to get the tire back on without the caliper in the way ). Unscrew and pull out the rear axle, push the tire towards the back of the swing arm and take the chain off. Thats it.

Also, be careful when removing the tires for any spacers, notice where they are so if they fall out you know where to put them back. When you put the rear tire back on start by putting the cain back on and try to get it as even in slack from the top-bottom as possible. When you get the rear axle back on, tighten the chain tension bolts up as even as you can for about 1" of slack. Then sit behind the rear tire and spin the tire and watch the chain on the sprocket. If it is not staying centered on the sprocket and pulling over to one side, tighten or loosen the corresponding chain tension bolt till it is riding centered on the sprocket.

Good luck
 

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You do not need to touch the chain tensioners at all. Take the rear axle nut off, take the axle out, take the chain off the sprocket and drop the rear wheel out. No need to remove the rear caliper either. You may have to remove it from the slide on the inside of the swing arm, but no where else. Putting the rear wheel on is easy also. Just slide the wheel in the swingarm, put the chain on, lift the wheel into the rear brake caliper and put the axle thru. Remember the spacers.

If you are having to adjust the tensioners then your chain is entirely too tight for the race track and street riding. Remember you want a looser chain to let the rear suspension work to its fullest. I see many guys when I am working tech that have the chain with little to no freeplay. A tight chain is not good at all. It also causes excessive stress to the counter shaft.

And remember when you take your rear wheel to the Dunlop or Pirelli guy (or whatever tires you use), pull the cush drive out. The rubbers can stay, at least in mine they dont fall out.

Sean
WERA 81
www.svracer.net
 

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Yeah, what Clutch said. I've been changing my own wheels for years now and even change tires from time to time. Saves money for the street and time at the track. I used to have a bad habit of over-tightening my chain. I think that helped me to wear out rear tires more quickly and even low-side a time or two. Another hint, check your tire pressures often yourself, even on freshly mounted tires.
 
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