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Discussion Starter #1
Well my bike has about 16,300 miles on it and its scheduled to have the valve clearance checked, well it was supposed to be done about 300 miles ago. Anyone got a how-to or anything on it? What tools do I need? :bitchslap
 

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If you buy a service manual for your particular bike, there should be step-by-step instructions on how to do it. If you're planning to do a lot of maintenance yourself, it is advisable that you pick up one of these.

I've haven't done one yet, but my friend did it on his wife's F4i and you need some shims and stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Hams51 said:
If you buy a service manual for your particular bike, there should be step-by-step instructions on how to do it. If you're planning to do a lot of maintenance yourself, it is advisable that you pick up one of these.

I've haven't done one yet, but my friend did it on his wife's F4i and you need some shims and stuff.
:bitchslap Just remembered the Honda Shop Manual that I downloaded...tells step by step, stuff is right gotta have some molybdenum disulfide oil(never even heard of it), feeler gauge and shims I can see.
 

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i've only done it on my ex250, and it wasnt too hard.
took me about 2.5 hours and I'm slow with that kind of stuff.

just get a service manual.
 

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It really depends on the bike... Some use shims, others use screw adjustment. Get the service manual for your bike (probably $50-60), look through the instructions for doing the adjustment, and order the parts and/or tools you need from your dealer. If you are not mechanically inclined I wouldn't suggest doing this particular maintainance on your bike as misadjusting your valve clearances can cause serious damage to your motor if the clearances are to far out of spec.

Tools I know for sure you will need... a good torque wrench or two, a good socket set, feeler guages, and plastic baggies and a sharpie marker to keep track of parts.
 

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LittleTex said:
:bitchslap Just remembered the Honda Shop Manual that I downloaded...tells step by step, stuff is right gotta have some molybdenum disulfide oil(never even heard of it), feeler gauge and shims I can see.
That's interesting... Honda uses screw-type valve adjustors in their cars, I wonder why they use shims in their bikes?
 

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They use shims in their sportbikes. Most high-performance sportbikes do for reasons of simplicity and weight. Makes them a bastard to check though. Get the service manual. You will require a set of metric sockets, a new valve cover gasket, torque wrench, a set of feeler gauges and shims after you know which ones you need.

The first time takes a while. Just take it easy and plan everything out. Stands help greatly in doing this.
 

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You wanna pay the bill for me? I don't have the money...
no. i also don't want to be blamed if you make an error.

LittleTex said:
:bitchslap Just remembered the Honda Shop Manual that I downloaded...tells step by step, stuff is right gotta have some molybdenum disulfide oil(never even heard of it), feeler gauge and shims I can see.
you've covered step one. the service manual. if you have a printer, print it and store it in a three ring binder. it may also help to get some of them little tabbythings so you can mark the chapters.

get a good tool set. don't skimp. you may need the same socket size but in different drive size.

most important is this. if you don't feel comfortable doing this. DON'T! if you make a mistake you may be looking at replacing your motor. that will cost a lot more than paying for the valve adjustment.

if you do decide to take the bike in there are ways to save yourself some money. the parts for a valve adjustment cost a few bucks. its the labor thats a killer. the time spent taken off all the shit to get to the valves is going to eat a good 1/2 hour of your service time. putting it back on is the same. if you have the tools and the time do that part yourself. pull the bodywork. if they need the bike to run leave the tank, airbox and carbs on it. if they don't pull that too. that way all the mechanic has to do is check the clearance, exchange the shims and button the motor back together. i'm pretty sure most shops will consider a mutilcylinder multivalve motor a 3 hour job. if you can save them an hour or an hour and a half you've saved yourself some money too.

a valve adjustment isn't impossible but, again, if you mess up you may damage your motor. valves and pistons only get along when they don't have to touch each other. 300mi isnt a great deal of miles past the recomended interval period. you can wait a little bit to save some money if you want to take it in.

good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well I've got 2 Draper torque wrenchs coming in the mail to me a 1/2" 30-210Nm and a 3/8" 10-80Nm. I'm going to go buy a Stanley 246 piece tool set that has a 1/4", 3/8", and 1/2" Drive Quick-release Pear Head Ratchets, 3 Extensions, 110 Sockets, 42 Deep Sockets, 26 Full-polish Professional Style Wrenches, 14 Nut Drivers, 7 Bits, 41 Additional Tools with a lifetime warranty. As far as stands I have Pit Bull Forward Handle Rear stand so hopefully I'll be all set.
 

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Ok, taking anything apart is easy, that includes the engine, putting it back together properly is a bit more challending. However, it's not that bad. I know some people are afraid of getting the valve timing incorrectly, but don't worry about that. There are plenty of reference marks stamped on the engine internals so you should not have any problems when reassembling it.
 
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