Sport Bikes banner

1 - 20 of 61 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Well, been riding around on the Ninja 250. I'm starting to feel pretty comfortable going around town. Still have to get some highway experience, along with heavy traffic experience.
I was wondering if there is a general guideline as to when's the earliest one should move up to a 600cc sportbike? There are a couple bikes I want in the future and I was hoping to get some good end of year deals on them. Once I get to the level where I can ride around anywhere as well as I can in a car, does that mean I should be ok on a 600?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,985 Posts
well, im getting my first street bike and it is gonna be a yamaha yzf600r, i been told by plenty of people that a 600 is a great starter bike as long as you dont drive like an idiot on it. so you should be fine (although i am starting on my first street bike, rode dirt bikes for about 10 years)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
750 Posts
My theory is, YOU wil know. Not anybody else... you know your comfort level, and confidence level. Just keep a cool head and realize a 600ss is a hell of a lot more bike than a 250. Take it just as easy as you did the 250 when you first got it and be easy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,682 Posts
There is the bike you learn how to ride on (preferably cheap, used, small and not too important) and the bike you want. That's all. After you've learned how to ride well, get what you want.

My only advice would be that it takes about five times more experience to be a good rider than it takes to feel like one. Make a sober and careful assessment of your abilities. No one can do it for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
That's the thing. I feel like I've been making some fast progress lately. Even my wife was commenting on how I look pretty comfortable on a bike in such a short time. However, I don't want to mistake this for false confidence and jump the gun too quickly. I'm at the point now where I don't have to think too much about the bike's controls (ie. how/when to shift, how to brake, etc). I'm spending more time focusing on the road now.
I guess I'm just wondering because the general advice I hear is that you should ride your starter bike for the first year. If I feel like I'm ready to move up before that though, am I just kidding myself?

The plus side either way though, is that the 250 is what my wife uses too. Since she's petite and wants a smaller bike (plus she has no desire to go too fast anyway), we are keeping that bike long term. So I will always have that to go back to if I need practice on an easier bike.
 

·
old member
Joined
·
13,079 Posts
As has been said before, only you can answer this question. Progress comes fast the first several months.

But, some observations and suggestions. If you have to ask, you're not ready. Statistically I think many new riders go down in the 4 months to 1 year of riding experience range. They get confident but haven't experienced too many potentially hazardous situations yet.

Once you can ride in any traffic, on any road/highway/freeway, at any legal speed for at least a few months without an "oh-shit" moment that you caused or could have avoided, I would consider "upgrading". My $0.02.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,985 Posts
i respect your caution, its good that you dont want to jump and get something your not ready for. if I were you I would go ahead and get the 600, and start out just like you did on the 250, learn it first, and when you feel confident on it then your set to go
 

·
what R you lookin' at?
Joined
·
5,313 Posts
nitrotc3drifter said:
i respect your caution, its good that you dont want to jump and get something your not ready for. if I were you I would go ahead and get the 600, and start out just like you did on the 250, learn it first, and when you feel confident on it then your set to go

dude, you aren't even riding, and your handing out advice, that could result in death................. :rolleyes , just cuz your choosing to go w/ a 600 doesn't make it a good decision.....and your exp. has no bearing on his riding skills...

for the orig. poster:

how many miles have you ridden? yes riders usually go down in the first yr of riding, many time due to their overconfidence....

if you really want a test , go do a trackday, you'll learn you have alot to go.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
252 Posts
I rode my ex500 for ~5 months before upgrading to a YZF600R, and the transition was seamless for me. So, I recommend at least 3 months of solid riding in all sorts of traffic before you make the jump. In any case, you'll be WAY ahead of the people who skipped beginner bikes and got 600 supersports as their first bikes.

And don't listen to this guy below. I love how people with limited or no riding experience at all give bike recommendations.

nitrotc3drifter said:
i respect your caution, its good that you dont want to jump and get something your not ready for. if I were you I would go ahead and get the 600, and start out just like you did on the 250, learn it first, and when you feel confident on it then your set to go
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,985 Posts
RACER X said:
dude, you aren't even riding, and your handing out advice, that could result in death................. :rolleyes , just cuz your choosing to go w/ a 600 doesn't make it a good decision.....and your exp. has no bearing on his riding skills....
i been ridin dirt bikes, four wheelers, snowmobiles for ten years without any crashes resulting in more than getting up laughing, this thread has the same concept as somebody moving from a 80 or a 125dirt bike to a 250 dirt bike or even from a four stroke to a two stroke, im saying it fine to get a b***** bike as long as you know what you are getting yourself in to, and im not telling him to just get it and go right in traffic, when i told him to learn the bike first i meant learn the bike before he goes in traffic
 

·
what R you lookin' at?
Joined
·
5,313 Posts
your dirt riding is great experience.......and will help you on the street immensly.......but you still have no clue about street bikes.
 

·
Already Sick of Winter
Joined
·
3,273 Posts
shamster said:
Well, been riding around on the Ninja 250. I'm starting to feel pretty comfortable going around town. Still have to get some highway experience, along with heavy traffic experience.
I was wondering if there is a general guideline as to when's the earliest one should move up to a 600cc sportbike? There are a couple bikes I want in the future and I was hoping to get some good end of year deals on them. Once I get to the level where I can ride around anywhere as well as I can in a car, does that mean I should be ok on a 600?
i'm not big ont he whole "when is it time to upgrade" thing. i really don't consider a larger bike ungrade. if you take the same skill, or lack thereof, to a larger bike you haven't really upgraded. you've just bought a b***** bike.


reading your post this is what i gather. you've been puttering around town on your 250. 15~45 miles an hour. haven't been on the highway. haven't seen a twisty road. haven't seen oil in the middle of a turn or pea gravel, or rain, or lots of traffic. basically you've been riding a bike like a moped all the while thinking about what bike you really wish you had instead learning how to ride the bike you own. i don't mean to sound harsh, its just the way i come across.

its nice that you'll have the smaller bike to fall back on when you want to practice. that is very special and wonderful. won't meana damn thing if you are on a bike that you have no control over and centerpunch a tree or a car or a curb.

learning to ride is not a destination. you don't get to a point where you stop learning or this magical plateau. don't rush it. no one can tell you when you are ready. honestly, if you have to ask, you aren't. instead of wondering whether you should be riding a 600 ride your 250 like it was. start using the power....all of it. start using the handling...exploring lean angle and braking. have some fun on it until its no longer any fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,985 Posts
RACER X said:
your dirt riding is great experience.......and will help you on the street immensly.......but you still have no clue about street bikes.
yes, you are 100% right. i appologize for being a :squid , i should have explained myself alot better too. i did drive a zx6r (my stepbrother's) on small town roads a few times (which is why i really want a bike now) with only dirt bike experiance, and i handled the bike well enough to be able to slowly go into light traffic, and that is what i was getting at, i figured if he can ride the 250 really well, he should be able to at least ride the 600 good enough to work his way up on it the same way he worked his way with the 250.
 

·
what R you lookin' at?
Joined
·
5,313 Posts
how about learning to ride his 250 WELL, then upgrading..........he hasn't even hit the hi-ways........

and as i said your 10yrs dirt is prolly alot more then his if he even has any.......

don't assume everybody is as experienced as you.......you ever heard that phrase...know's enough to be dangerous.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Thanks for the advice.

I guess my main impression is to try to experience all the variables out on the street as I can. Yes, I haven't seen any oil, rain, etc. Although one guy was wrong...I have seen some twisties...I live in an area with rolling hills and not all the roads are exactly straight. I handle those curves as well as a car driver would at normals speeds, but of course, I'm not exactly carving them up.
However, to this day, I haven't ever really ran across an oil slick in my car, and I've been driving for over 12 years. I do have to kind of disagree with the statement "if you have to ask if you're ready, then you probably aren't." Because even if I got to a very high skill level, I'm still going to ask this question. I can't possibly encounter every scenario out there, so I will always question something I haven't experienced. I was just trying to get a general feel for how other newbies monitor their progress before they were able to handle a b***** bike. I know I'm not ready today, but maybe I will be in a few months? Or maybe not. I also find time not to always be a good measure for everyone. One person I talked to said he used a full tank of gas riding around his townhouse development before he was ready to hit regular streets. I got bored after the first hour riding in slow residential zones before I hit the 45mph zones. I forced myself to stick with the parking lot and slow zones a little longer just so I wouldn't get ahead of myself though and to just reinforce the basic skills.
That's the tricky part. I don't really know many riders. So far, I have not found any open track around here. So I have no real way of measuring my own progress. So I can be riding for 10 years on the same bike and still ask myself if I'm ready for a 600. I don't have anyone else who can guide me on progreess, nor do I have access to another 600 for me to "try out".
It's true, learning is not a destination. I've studied classical piano my entire life until I went to college (almost went to music school), so I have a pretty good discipline when it comes to progress. I believe no matter what level you're at, there's always room for improvement in anything you do. However, there still has to be some way to measure progress, and that's all I was after in my original post. I study Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu too, and that too is a never-ending learning process. However, if you were to get promoted in rank (and for those who compete, rank matters in regards to what level of fighters you will go against), you need to qualify for it. You have to be able to demonstrate certain skills and abilities on the mat if you want to compete against better opponents. I figure it may be somewhat similar with bikes. To be able to safely handle a 600, I presume one must be competent in the basics of motorcycling and traffic.
Just wondering what sorts of skills are important when moving up from a 250 to a 600. To me, that's important because I intend on being safe at all times and I would not want a 600 if I don't have the skills necessary to handle one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,985 Posts
i thought he said he had some highway experiance? if he dont then i wouldnt recomend the 600 either
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,985 Posts
oh!!!!!!! then no i wouldnt get the 600 yet, i would imagine thats like learning to ride 100 cc four stroke a dirt bike on an open field and then buying a two stroke 250 and attempting to jump it....which is not a good thing
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
912 Posts
shamster said:
I study Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu too, and that too is a never-ending learning process. However, if you were to get promoted in rank (and for those who compete, rank matters in regards to what level of fighters you will go against), you need to qualify for it. You have to be able to demonstrate certain skills and abilities on the mat if you want to compete against better opponents.
I'm glad you said this, it's something I can use as an analogy.

Let's say it takes 5 years to be a GOOD jui-jitsu fighter. Not great, GOOD.

Let's say it takes 1 year or 10k+ miles to be a GOOD rider. Not great, GOOD. And by good I don't mean fast. I mean safe, responsible, and prepared to handle almost any situation that can be thrown at you with relative confidence of successfully avoiding a mishap.

Now, you jumping to a 600cc supersport NOW, after only a few weeks of riding around town and a couple trips in the country, would be like a student with 1 year of jui-jitsu training stepping into the octagon with Royce Gracie. Sure, he COULD survive (Not win 'cause let's face it, that just isn't going to happen...), but his chances are severely diminished due to lack of experience.

This scenario may be a little exagerated, but the principle is still the same. Sure you COULD make the jump, but it's probably not a good idea until you're at least a GOOD fighter/rider.
 
1 - 20 of 61 Posts
Top