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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
In case anyone else needs ideas for wheel chocks, I figured I would share my build.

I'm going to be trailering two bikes in a couple weeks to NJMP for a track day, so I decided to build my own wheel chocks instead of buying them. I've built two so far; one for each of the front wheels. My bike has a 110mm front tire and the other bike has a 120mm front tire. I built them with materials I had around the house, but I ran out of 2x4s, so I will build the ones for the rear tires later.

Each chock requires about 100" of 2x4 boards, so one 10' board works. I used 6" hex bolts for attacking the chock to my trailer, which has expanded metal flooring, but a 4" would probably be more appropriate for my needs. Like I said, I used what I had around the house, which, in this case, was 6" bolts.

Materials list and approximate pricing is as follows:

(1) 10' 2x4 - $4 ea
(4) 4" 3/8" hex bolts - $0.50 ea (6" bolts probably a quarter more or so each)
(8) 1.5" 3/8" washers - $0.25 ea
(4) 3/8" lock washers - $0.20 ea
(4) 3/8" nuts - $0.20 ea
A few wood screws - maybe $0.25 total

Total cost per chock - about $10, and about 30 minutes labor

Here's a couple pictures of the chocks






The front rotor isn't as close at looks in this picture when it's strapped in because the bolts underneath raised the board up sitting on the cement.

Here's a schematic with measurements. The numbers in parentheses are for a 120mm front tire.




The build was quick and easy. I spent more time typing out this post and drawing the picture on Paint than I did actually building the chocks.
 

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you don't really need to make one for the rear to be honest.

looks good though :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
you don't really need to make one for the rear to be honest.

looks good though :)
Thanks. I was actually debating on whether or not to make rear ones. I figured I would go ahead and do it since they're easy to make and I like the additional peace of mind.
 

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Looking good. I've been thinking about putting a chock in my truck, but I'm not sure how long I'm going to keep that thing. I keep going back and forth between keeping it till it dies since it's not worth much anymore, trading it in on a small commuter car, or waiting till I pay off a loan in a few years and buying a new car.

Have you thought about putting another 2x4 in the "front" of the chock that you have to roll the wheel over? That way you should be able to run the bike in, and it'll hold itself up on its own.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Looking good. I've been thinking about putting a chock in my truck, but I'm not sure how long I'm going to keep that thing. I keep going back and forth between keeping it till it dies since it's not worth much anymore, trading it in on a small commuter car, or waiting till I pay off a loan in a few years and buying a new car.

Have you thought about putting another 2x4 in the "front" of the chock that you have to roll the wheel over? That way you should be able to run the bike in, and it'll hold itself up on its own.
That's a good idea. I think I might just go ahead and do that.

I'd rather just pay $40 at Harbor Freight for one that's already made and works awesome...

Plus, over time, that wood is going to split...
Ha. I may end up eventually buying one that will last longer. However, for the time being, this should work okay... Plus there's a certain safisfaction that comes with doing something with my own hands instead of buying a ready-made one (even if it won't last as long :eek:nfloor).
 

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Plus, like you said, you did both for $10 each. I'm a cheap ass. I put off buying a bead breaker for nearly 2 years and just got by using a C clamp or a woodworking clamp since I already had them. Just bought it yesterday for $18. And finally got longer tire irons. Man was I missing out. I put in a hell of a lot more effort into swapping tires than was needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Plus, like you said, you did both for $10 each. I'm a cheap ass. I put off buying a bead breaker for nearly 2 years and just got by using a C clamp or a woodworking clamp since I already had them. Just bought it yesterday for $18. And finally got longer tire irons. Man was I missing out. I put in a hell of a lot more effort into swapping tires than was needed.
Which bead breaker did you get? I have one that basically works like a C-clamp and I've been thinking about getting one of the lever ones.

I just put on a new rear tire yesterday and I kept thinking that I really need a couple longer tire irons. I have one that is 15" and two 8" irons. They work fine on car tires, but motorcycles are a different beast.
 

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The Motorcycle bead breaker from harbor freight. $20, and I had a 20% off from the back of a magazine. And I bought 2 15" tire irons. I had been using 3 much smaller ones.

Motorcycle Bead Breaker

Works good, but I need to fab up some spacers so that it's not resting on the calipers. I had to shove 2 blocks of wood and a rag on it to protect them.
 

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The nice thing about the HF chock is that it will hold the bike upright without it being strapped down. While I would not transport it that way it is a nice feature for strapping it down/undoing the straps.
I did have a bike on my trailer that was poorly strapped down a while ago. Noticed that it leaning in the rear view mirror. Pulled over to see that both straps that held the front (via CanyonDancer) had come off. Bike did not, luckily, fall over in the HF chock :)
 

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The second one (yes, I was surprised too).

I have a pair on my trailer and other than showing some rust after a few seasons and being a bit of a bitch to get your bike out off if you put it in there with a hot front tires they are a great buy - I got them for $29.95 or so per.
 

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.... so this one time...on our way to deal's gap...


:hide
That's enough outta you.

The second one (yes, I was surprised too).

I have a pair on my trailer and other than showing some rust after a few seasons and being a bit of a bitch to get your bike out off if you put it in there with a hot front tires they are a great buy - I got them for $29.95 or so per.
Sounds good. If I could combine the second one with the T-section of the first, only not in front of the chock, then that would be best. The bed of my truck is small so the rear wheel is barely not on the tailgate with the wheel all the way up against the front. So option 1 wouldn't work.
 

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You could put an "T" section of sorts on the second one but I don't think you could really use it as say a track stand contraption (like the first stand). The bike will stay in the chock but you can lean it side to side a good bit if you push on the bike. I certainly would not want to sit on the bike with just my chocks holding it place.
 
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