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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So when I am at a higher rate of speed like 60-70 on the freeway and need to exit the offramp, I tend to shift the bike into neutral and coast to the traffic light. But if I need to get back into gear from neutral and shift up, I hear a scratching sound when I try to shift up. I can still shift up to the desired gear, but from N to 2nd gear, it always makes that loud scratch sound.

Is it just some kind of warning? Or why would my bike make that sound only when I'm trying to do the N to 2nd gear shift while cruising at highway speeds of like 50-70 mph.
 

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First off, you should NOT be coasting to a stop in neutral. I won't say I never do it, but I rarely do it.

Having the bike in the appropriate gear gives you the ability to respond to unexpected circumstances - car not slowing down, etc...

If you are going pretty fast still and try to shift, the engine speed is much lower than it needs to be, so the gears are very out of sync. This calls for "rev matching" where you rev up the engine to the approximate rpm it would be in if it were in gear, then you shift. I'm not sure what you mean by "scratching", but you will definitely get a noise when there is a big mismatch in current rpm versus rpm needed for the gear you are shifting into
 

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So when I am at a higher rate of speed like 60-70 on the freeway and need to exit the offramp, I tend to shift the bike into neutral and coast to the traffic light. But if I need to get back into gear from neutral and shift up, I hear a scratching sound when I try to shift up. I can still shift up to the desired gear, but from N to 2nd gear, it always makes that loud scratch sound.

Is it just some kind of warning? Or why would my bike make that sound only when I'm trying to do the N to 2nd gear shift while cruising at highway speeds of like 50-70 mph.
What in the name of holy fuck are you trying to do? you don't shift into fucking neutral on a bike unless your ass is sitting still. Do you have any concept of how a bike transmission works?

Good fucking god that poor motorcycle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
First off, you should NOT be coasting to a stop in neutral. I won't say I never do it, but I rarely do it.

Having the bike in the appropriate gear gives you the ability to respond to unexpected circumstances - car not slowing down, etc...

If you are going pretty fast still and try to shift, the engine speed is much lower than it needs to be, so the gears are very out of sync. This calls for "rev matching" where you rev up the engine to the approximate rpm it would be in if it were in gear, then you shift. I'm not sure what you mean by "scratching", but you will definitely get a noise when there is a big mismatch in current rpm versus rpm needed for the gear you are shifting into
Well, scratching is more just like a noise or clanking kind of sound. And lots of vibration. My bike is fine when shifting into 2nd at lower speeds or at idle. So I can just rev my engine to match the speed and that won't happen if I accidently did put it into neutral while coasting on the highway off ramp?

Well, I guess I'll won't shift into neutral until I get much closer to the stop light. I did it at the beginning of the off ramp with 10 seconds left to the stop light.
 

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That noise is the gears of your transmission screaming in agony as they attempt to mesh. . .
 

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Rev matching is a good skill to practice during normal shifting as well. It reduces strain on the gear box and clutch, and will help ensure you don't break traction.

Yes, you can just rev it to what you think it needs to be. If you accidentally put it neutral while coasting, it's not the end of the world. Stay there or decide to shift back into a gear.

There are youtube videos that cover this. I'm in a training class so I can't turn on sound to check them out, but see what you can find.
 

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Shifting into second gear (assuming you mean disengaging the clutch as well) at 50-70 mph on a 650 seems kind of like a bad idea to me. Sure, it might be under the redline and you can rev-match. But...why?
 

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https://www.google.com/search?q=mot...EDIrfsASso4CABA&ved=0CE8QsAQ&biw=1220&bih=911



sound like it might be a dragging clutch. That produces a noise that might be called scratching. Go sit on the sidewalk and run a nail around in circles. That the noise?
First check your OIL. That is the most common cause of clutch problems. If it is too old, too full or too empty, do something about it. While changing your OIL AND filter, make sure you are using the correct viscosity OIL. Run a magnet through the OIL after you change it. IF you find little bits of metal, you waited too long.
If that doesn't work, you got problems. You either fix it before it breaks or fix it after it breaks, Your choice.
 

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https://www.google.com/search?q=mot...EDIrfsASso4CABA&ved=0CE8QsAQ&biw=1220&bih=911



sound like it might be a dragging clutch. That produces a noise that might be called scratching. Go sit on the sidewalk and run a nail around in circles. That the noise?
First check your OIL. That is the most common cause of clutch problems. If it is too old, too full or too empty, do something about it. While changing your OIL AND filter, make sure you are using the correct viscosity OIL. Run a magnet through the OIL after you change it. IF you find little bits of metal, you waited too long.
If that doesn't work, you got problems. You either fix it before it breaks or fix it after it breaks, Your choice.
Yeah, don't listen to this advice. It's your technique, not your oil. The above posters covered it. Don't shift into neutral to come to a stop. You should be downshifting and rev-matching.

For the love of all that's holy, take an MSF class before you end up splattered.
 

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Yeah, don't listen to this advice. It's your technique, not your oil. The above posters covered it. Don't shift into neutral to come to a stop. You should be downshifting and rev-matching.

For the love of all that's holy, take an MSF class before you end up splattered.
And if you don't get "splattered" it's for sure your transmission will. Keep doing what you're doing and one of these days the crankcase will dump its contents on the ground.
 

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-Piggybacking a question in here-
Would engine breaking the bike leaving the freeway be a more acceptable action in the opinions of you more experience riders? (Wondering if the techniques I used on my cruiser were bad practice)
 

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if I am leaving the freeway for an exit, I've never seen the issue with a quick couple of downshifts and some engine braking.
 
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-Piggybacking a question in here-
Would engine breaking the bike leaving the freeway be a more acceptable action in the opinions of you more experience riders? (Wondering if the techniques I used on my cruiser were bad practice)
Why would you not engine brake? Let off the gas and coast, then when the RPM drops sufficiently downshift to a lower gear.
 

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I have seen two anti engine braking arguments. (actually i have seen a few more than two, but these two are the only ones that i have heard, that make any sense.)

1.) if you down shift too far, you'll over rev the engine, and float the valves until bad things happen. (this is mostly a concern for new riders)

2.) when you engine break, you don't get much air into the combustion chamber on the intake stroke. this means that you aren't compressing as much air on the compression stroke. this means that you won't see as high a pressures on the compression stroke. without this high pressure pushing down on the top of the piston, you will see greater tensile loads on the connecting rods on the compression stroke. If these loads are high enough, you will break a connecting rod.
(personally i have never done the math to see if this explanation holds any water. I suspect this is one of those "their was a problem back in the 60's, this was suggested as a cause, and it has been spread by cranky, cantankerous, old farts ever sense.")

any way so long as you keep your down shifting while engine breaking to the lower part of the rev range, you should be ok.
 

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Yeah, don't listen to this advice. It's your technique, not your oil. The above posters covered it. Don't shift into neutral to come to a stop. You should be downshifting and rev-matching.

For the love of all that's holy, take an MSF class before you end up splattered.
Motorcycle deaths have gone up EVERY year since the Motorcycle Safety Fraud (MSF) opened it's doors. By any metric. So any claim that the MSF saves lives is bogus. If you had a starting pitcher with an ERA of over 10 and had never won a game, would you keep trotting him out there?
The MSF is in for the money. They are mostly a bunch of parking lot queens. They get some things right, but the law of averages says they will eventually.
The MSF people are afraid to debate this. They just go all holy roller and scream and shout. I would like to see numbers on what percentage of MSF grads (Class of Sunday?) dies under the wheels of a car compared to what that same percentage is for those who are smart enough to skip the MSF 5hit.:deadhorse

Listen to this guy tell you to not change your OIL. Find someone (beside me) with an engineering degree and ask them about that.
 

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As an official "cranky, cantankerous, old fart" I have zero issues with downshifting. Do it whenever I think I need to. Motorcycles are not cars. Motorcycles are DESIGNED to pull RPM's. I routinely ride around in 2nd gear at about 8K. That works out to about 45/50 mph, which is ideal for suburban traffic. It also works well on the back roads, at least until some farmer in his 30 year old pick up gets behind me going 70. Then I shift to 3, 4th on the straights.
While I don't consider my FZ-6 a sportbike, she does like to run gears. Both ways.
The original engine of my bike (Not this one but the design) was for a 600 cc Racer. The red line was 22,000 RPM. Then the racer got obsolete, so they took the engine and made something called an R6. Redline was 18,000 RPM. That got obsolete, so they took the engine and made a street racer (crotch rocket) called a YZF-600 (Thundercat in Europe) AFAIK it has a 16,000 RPM redline. The FZ-6 was built as the 'civilized' version. FI, more upright seating, 2 piece delta box frame.
The thing is ALL these motorcycles share the same bottom end. Cams, lifters, brakes and ceretain other things differ but my crank, rods etc. share the same design as those of the 22,000 RPM Racer. Not sure if the bearings are the same but that really doesn't matter. So I consider my 14,500 RPM redline a suggestion, not a warning.
 
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