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Discussion Starter #1
For those interested in a performance upgrade for your FZ6 brakes, I installed the Galfer S.S. brake line kits (front and rear) last weekend. I ordered the kits through hardracing.com which took a little over a week to get and cost $139 including s&h. The front kit is a 2 line setup which supposedly gives better braking "feel".
The quality of the Galfer lines was top notch. They were the standard clear covered lines with silver fittings and nickel plated banjo bolts. The kits contain new compression washers and banjo bolts.
Although I only got a hour to ride since the installation, the improved feel and stopping power is definately noticeable. I spent some parking lot time doing panic stops and didn't find any tendancy for lockups compared to the stock lines. Overall, I would say that the new S.S. lines give just a hint more initial "bite", better feel (feedback) at the lever during braking, and improved stopping power.
FYI, since a complete fluid change is necessary, I opted for ATE Blue Racing fluid which gets real high scores in all catagories - even for track use. I also used a Mity-Vac for the fluid purge and bleeding... something that comes in handy for the suggested fluid changes. Be warned! Galfer is very specific in requiring that the banjo bolts be torqued! - no more than 12 ft-lbs.
 

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Thanks for the write-up. This is usually the first mod I like to do, but for some reason I've held off on doing this. I hear that with the Racing Blue you need to swap that out a little more frequently than your average fluid. Do you know how often?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Xantri... I remember you mentioned you were interested in the S.S. brake line mod for your upcoming track days. The ATE Blue Racing is actually one of the few that you can extend the fluid changes due to the low rate that it absorbs moisture. I believe ATE states up to 2 1/2 years between changes. Do an on-line search on this fluid and see if you don't find the same info.
 

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Stupid question... How does changing brake lines improve your braking performance? I know, it's a total n00b question :)

-Q
 

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qualdoth said:
Stupid question... How does changing brake lines improve your braking performance? I know, it's a total n00b question :)

-Q
It has to do with the temperatures that it can handle versus your average brake fluid. The ATE has a higher boiling point.



Okay I am an idiot. I did not read his question correctly. :hshot
 

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The stainless lines don't flex or expand like stock rubber lines. The brake fluid is more directly pushed into the caliper piston. You have to use more pressure on the brakes with stock lines to achieve the same amount of braking. I use stainless on my cars, but haven't put them on the bike yet. Of course, I lock up often enough, that I am not sure I need to! :nuts

-J
 

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I put SS on my Harley last week and there is really a great improvement. I thought the front brakes used 3 lines not two, I 'll have to check tonight. Also how about going to Dot5 fluid instead of Dot 4?
 

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Cavi said:
I put SS on my Harley last week and there is really a great improvement. I thought the front brakes used 3 lines not two, I 'll have to check tonight. Also how about going to Dot5 fluid instead of Dot 4?
I have never heard anyone say DOT5 was good for anything. If you try it let us know how it performs. :D

Here is some info found on "the net":

DOT5 is a good choice for the weekend driver/show car. It doesn't absorb water and it doesn't eat paint. One caveat is that because it doesn't absorb water, water that gets in the system will tend to collect at low points. In this scenario, it would actually be promoting corrosion! Annual flushing might be a good idea.

And:


DOT5 does NOT mix with DOT3 or DOT4. They also maintain that all reported problems with DOT5 are probably due to some degree of mixing with other fluid types. They said the proper way to convert to DOT5 is to totally rebuild the hydraulic system.

Careful bleeding is required to get all of the air out of the system. Small bubbles can form in the fluid that will form large bubbles over time. It may be necessary to do a series of bleeds.


DOT5 is probably not the thing to use in your race car although it is rated to stand up to the heat generated during racing conditions. The reason for this recommendation is the difficult bleeding mentioned above.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
In regards to the benefits of the S.S. braided lines, it's as FazeX explained... during braking, the brake pressure on the stock lines makes them expand in diameter slightly. This reduces the amount of pressure available to move the pistons within the calipers. The new S.S. lines seem to give a much better "feel" as to how much brake pressure is being applied, especially during hard braking.
FYI, stick with the Dot 4 fluids. If you don't want to spend the extra beans on top end fluid, Valvoline SynPower seems to be getting good comments also.
 

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I like the Galfer lines and ATE fluids

I installed Galfer Stainless Steel front brake lines on my 2000 Honda CBR600F4 (which is for sale by the way) and was very happy with them. They definitely made a noticable performance increase (especially on the track) and I plan on eventually installing them on my FZ6.

I was sort of hoping that somebody would come up with a magical caliper upgrade solution for our FZ6s, so that we could bolt on a set of better looking/performing calipers from a hypersports bike of some kind (e.g. R6), but I haven't heard of such a swap yet.

And ATE brake fluids rock! Their wet boiling point is quite high, unlike many other fluids, and the wet BP is what matters the most, unless you swap out your fluid weekly. A bonus, is freaking people out when they look at the sight glass on your front brake resevoir and see blue. :)

I run ATE super blue (and their gold stuff) in my car and cycle. On the car, I alternate between the blue and gold fluids (same thing besides the color) so I know when the system is fully flushed. I use speedbleeders on my car, but I find them unnecessary on a cycle, since I can reach the brake lever and bleeder valve at the same time.

JimE
http://jrevans.fbody.com
 

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Hey, can somebody post pics of their FZ6 with SS lines. I like to see pictures.
 
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