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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

I recently took my MSF course (Or whatever its called in Canada) but I don't have a bike to ride yet, so no experience as of now. My goal is to eventually get a 600cc SS once I have enough experience. My dad also took the MSF course with me and is going to buy his buddy's 2007 Honda Shadow 750 and said that I could ride it whenever I wanted. Now I really don't want to ride a cruiser around (I'm 20 and would probably be riding it to campus everyday), but I figured it would save me 4-5k buying a Ninja 300.

So my question is, will I have enough skill after riding the Honda for a year to move up to a SS? or would something like a Ninja 650 or Yamaha FZ6R be the next step? Or should I just get a ninja 300 which I wouldn't mind riding for a few years?
 

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How often will your dad be using it? There's something to be said about having your own bike, and also something to be said for having a free bike to use.

Personally I'd buy a used bike to have as my own, but that's just me.

Also, no one can tell you how much skill you'll have gained over a year.
 

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Ride the Shadow for a year while you save up for a 600 sounds like a great plan to me. Good luck and have fun.
 

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Depends on how much you ride the shadow and in what conditions. If you only put on like 2k miles in a year, no, that's not enough. If you never ride in the rain or traffic, I'd say no, that's not enough. But like 5k and riding in all kinds of conditions? Go for it.
 

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If I were you, I'd buy a used small-bore sport bike, probably a Ninja 500 (aka EX-500), and ride every chance I got in all kinds of conditions and on all kinds of roads. Aim for 10,000 miles during that year.

After a year, you'll be able to sell that used bike for close to what you paid for it. You'll then have received a cheap education on a good-handling, responsive bike and be ready to move to a 600.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If I were you, I'd buy a used small-bore sport bike, probably a Ninja 500 (aka EX-500), and ride every chance I got in all kinds of conditions and on all kinds of roads. Aim for 10,000 miles during that year.

After a year, you'll be able to sell that used bike for close to what you paid for it. You'll then have received a cheap education on a good-handling, responsive bike and be ready to move to a 600.
Yeah I feel like this is my best option. Do you think a ninja 650 would be too big? 500s are hard to find in my area but the 650s are plentiful.
 

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Yeah I feel like this is my best option. Do you think a ninja 650 would be too big? 500s are hard to find in my area but the 650s are plentiful.
650s are usually only suggested to those with years of off road experience, and even then will be a steep learning curve. Its way too easy to get in over your head with 70 hp, and the additional weight and more aggressive steering geometry make slow speed handling harder.
 

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Another used alternative might be the Suzuki GS500F, if they're easier to find in your area. Or how about a Yamaha Seca?

The Ninja 300 you mentioned would also be a good choice, but they haven't been around long enough to be a bargain on the used market yet.
 

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650s are usually only suggested to those with years of off road experience, and even then will be a steep learning curve. Its way too easy to get in over your head with 70 hp, and the additional weight and more aggressive steering geometry make slow speed handling harder.
I'm not entirely disagreeing with you here, but wikipedia says the 650 weighs 440 wet compared to the 500's 438. Sitting on 650s (not riding), I felt it was as upright, or even more upright than my 500. Unless you mean some other aspect of the geometry other than the seating position. But he's going to be riding a Shadow, which is both heavier and more difficult (I'd assume) to do low-speed turning on than the 650.

The power aspect I do agree with somewhat as both the 500 and 650 have enough power to be trouble, but if you're looking at pre-update 650s, you're talking 65hp, which isn't really that much more than the 500.
 

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I'm not entirely disagreeing with you here, but wikipedia says the 650 weighs 440 wet compared to the 500's 438. Sitting on 650s (not riding), I felt it was as upright, or even more upright than my 500. Unless you mean some other aspect of the geometry other than the seating position. But he's going to be riding a Shadow, which is both heavier and more difficult (I'd assume) to do low-speed turning on than the 650.

The power aspect I do agree with somewhat as both the 500 and 650 have enough power to be trouble, but if you're looking at pre-update 650s, you're talking 65hp, which isn't really that much more than the 500.
I was reffering to the rake and trail, but I'd bet the riders triangle is a bit tighter on the 650s. Also, the b***** engine translates to more rotating mass, making it feel heavier than it is
 
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