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Discussion Starter #1
Is anyone out there considering this model?

I sort of like it, but am a bit put off by a couple things. It really should weigh less. At 475 lbs it's a real oinker. :D And then there's the price. The Suzuki website says the MSRP is $7K. It seems like they could at least match the price of a Kawasaki Ninja 650R ($6,500).

I'm probably in the demographic of folks who would buy the Bandit. From my experience, most of them are older, experienced riders who sport-tour and tour on their bikes... but can't see themselves on something as monstrous as a Yamaha FJR. This new Suzuki isn't going to come close to offering the performance of the Bandit, but it looks like it will provide the same ergos, a full fairing, and a more reasonable price. So, that probably makes it worth looking at.
 

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i'm considering this for my second bike, but like you said, the weight issue puts me off about it...i saw a 6700 price tag in the latest issue of motorcyclist though

i'm hoping our local suzuki dealer will get one in and let me take it out
 

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The 650f looks like it will make a good highway cruiser but will probably have a pretty narrow market. I think the SV650 will have more appeal because of its lower weight and price.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
nater said:
I think the SV650 will have more appeal because of its lower weight and price.
I'm a huge fan of the SV. I've owned three of them (all naked). One carb version (with the curvy frame and bodywork) and two fuel injected.

The SV is always high on my shopping list. It's just such a perfect all-around, do-anything machine. Odds are that it will win out over the GSX650F for me. I prefer being able to see the engine, and of course the lower price and weight are appealing.
 

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I gotta be honest, I don't see where Suzuki was going with this new bike. I guess I can appreciate that they're sticking with something tried and true, but still. Kawasaki has been updating their old wares so maybe Suzuki will do that eventually, rather than just adding a new fairing.

The GS line (500 and 650) just don't look appealing to my eyes anymore. And it's a real shame because I think they'd do what I'm looking for but I can't spend that kind of money on a bike that I don't really love to look at (like the Ninja 650).

Again, that's just my opinion but I'd be interested to see what kind of response they get with these bikes (well, the 650). Then again, maybe there's a huge market for it that I'm unaware of.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
SeqArtMark said:
The GS line (500 and 650) just don't look appealing to my eyes anymore.
This may be sort of academic and slightly nit-picky, but the GS500F and the GSX650F aren't really in the same "line" of bikes. Although they seem to look similar, and both appear to be sort of entry level, the GSX650F is really a completely new evolution of the Katana family (which it appears to have replaced). The "X" in the nomenclature tells the tale.

My guess is that Suzuki wanted something that was more of a direct competitor to the Ninja 650R. I always thought the SV650 did a decent job of that, but I guess Suzuki wanted a fully faired model that had handlebars (an upright seating position) like the Ninja. The fairing versions of the SV have a more aggressive riding position. It seems minor, but it's the only thing I can think of.
 

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The GSX650F and Ninja 650R can't be compaird. The GSX is an inline 4, the 650R is a twin. Only thing they have in common is they are 650cc engines. The GSX is more of a sport-touring bike more than anything. The SV is the compatition with the 650R, and personally I'd take the SV.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Anthonyd5189 said:
The GSX is an inline 4, the 650R is a twin.
I'd argue that that is pretty much the only thing they don't have in common. Not only that, in-line engines have alot more in common with one another (regardless of any difference in number of cylinders) than an in-line and a "V". The horsepower, torque and RPMs are completely different.

So, I disagree with you on that.

The GSX650F and the Ninja 650R share pretty much the same ergonomics... while an SV650S is much more aggressive. Also, both the GSX650F and the Ninja only come in completely fairing clad versions, while a good % of SV650 models that are sold are naked.

I do agree with you in that I like the SV more than the GSX650F or the Ninja 650R.
 

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I have an FZ6 and am currently looking for a new bike. I ride more on the highway than in the city. I think that the price and riding comfort of the Bandit 1250 cannot be beat. The GXR650F is a "baby bandit" style bike and is very popular in Europe so I think that is why Suzuki is trying to introduce them here. Unfortunately both have a dated style. I am thinking about either a Hyabusa (used-06/07) or a Triumph Sprint.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
ClodZuki said:
I do agree with you in that I like the SV more than the GSX650F or the Ninja 650R.
Alright... I'm flip-floppin here. :D

The SV is awesome, but the fact I've already had three of them just keeps nagging at me. Looks like the Triumph will sell this weekend. I checked a couple Suzuki dealers last weekend, and none of them had their '08 models in yet.
 

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As I get closer to my time of getting a new bike....I can't decide between the SV and the GSXF.

I want something with ergos similar to my GS...but with more power. I'm leaning toward the GSXF just because it seems to me that it's a "big brother" of the GS, and will suit my needs in a bike. Comfortable, able to ride for a distance yet can still be fun on some twisty roads.
 

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the GSX650F seems like an odd bike to me, IMO the SV is a much better all around bike.
Its also more "proven" and there are a crapload of aftermarket parts and resources for it.
I race an SV and I've ridden a friends SV street bike quite a few times, it does both perfectly. The faired version could use some higher bars if you want to do long distance stuff but for the twisties and track use the clip-on style bars are a lot better.

I can't stand the look of the GSX though, it looks like a cheap imitation of a GSX-R
 

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Yea, im still in high debate...the SV is cheaper and way lighter and i know for a fact insurance on the SV will be cheaper than the GSX...so idk, haha.
 

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Why would you want a big brother of something you already have? Explore something new, you can always go back to the same old same old.
 

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G'day everyone.

I have the new GSXF and it is a big brother of the GS500F sort of ,but its more of a baby bandit 1250.
It's a Bandit 650 which is a naked bike but now with a gixxer fairing ,the bandit 650 is sold in the UK and is a HUGE seller ,and a few of the K7 bandits 650 after market parts are available for this model also ,there is pipes etc from major companies ready to go.

I had a GS500F as my learner bike ,then went to a cruiser for a while {don't ask LOL}and wanted to get a full fairing semi-sports bike an all rounder bike again ,so I went with the GSXF.
I tried the FZ6S and ER6F {Ninja 650 is the USA I think you call it}and for one reason or another they just didn't fit me ,tried the GSXF and it felt like my old GS and I felt at home again ,but this time with more grunt.

And don't judge the bike by the pictures on the net ,they do look really good in the metal ,alot of my riding mate are surprised just how good it looks and how big it is ,also alot of comments on how much of a bike you get for the money.
Sure its no Gixxer 600 ,but compared to the other bikes in its class it's got the looks.
It has the normal "sit up right bars" ,but you do lean forward more then the GS ,not alot of pressure on the wrists ,but once you get into it you can throw it around easy.

Like Jackle1886 said ,if you got a GS500 I wouldn't get the GSX650F ,Its almost the same bike "in a way" ,try some thing new.
But if you love the GS and know it will do you for another couple of years ,but you want abit more power ,then this might be the bike for you.
Its sooo freaken easy to ride and very very smooth.

I'd recomend this bike to people that want a sport all rounder ,or not yet ready for a gixxer 600 ,or some one thats considering the FZ6 or Kawai 650.


Slideshow of pictures, photos, and videos, from webshots

Cheers Sled.:)
 

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Was doing some research on the GSX650F and came upon two articles if anyone is interested...

Suzuki GSX650F is the complete package - Telegraph


Suzuki sells more big-capacity bikes in the UK than any other company, a fact that must irk Honda, the world's biggest manufacturer. But if anyone's looking for the reason, it's not hard to find: Suzuki makes good bikes at very good prices. This is especially the case in the budget middleweight sector, where Suzuki offers a very wide range, from the basic GS500 twin (a snip at £3,349) and the SV650 V-twin (£4,599), to the Bandit 650 (£4,449). Then there are the GSR600 and V-Strom, and variants on the bikes mentioned, all of which undercut their rivals, often by substantial amounts.
Suzuki GSX650F

The GSX-R sports bike range, meanwhile, is the strongest brand in the class among the Japanese and, once again, good bikes with keen prices reinforce sales here. It's an enviable portfolio, but one where you'd think it would be hard to squeeze in further models without a great deal of overlap. Yet by the simple expedient of fitting a fairing to the Bandit 650, Suzuki has created yet another low-cost middleweight in the new GSX650F.

Changes from the Bandit really are minimal: the distinguishing bodywork is obvious and borrows heavily from GSX-R for its balanced, sports-bike mien. It is so much better than the odd, shapeless appearance of the old GSX600F, nicknamed "the Teapot" for its strange style. But the GSX-F's frame is the same as the Bandit's, the engine has only had some mild remapping to encourage revs, the suspension is tweaked (but no more), the fuel tank is the same, and so it goes on, with few modifications.

This is surprising, because the GSX650F feels very different to how you'd expect a faired Bandit to be. Different, and much better than it has a right to be. Suzuki is reluctant to make the link between GSX-F and Bandit for fear of tainting the sportier bike's image, but this bike can stand on its own merits.

It's aimed at novice riders looking for their first sports bike and older riders after something less frantic and ergonomically challenging than a GSX-R600; it deals with both tasks supremely well. The riding position leans you forward slightly without imposing too much weight on the wrists, while the seat is a reasonable height and comfortable too. The cockpit looks more GSX-R than budget, with its digital screen grafted onto the analogue rev counter, and includes gear position and adjustable gear-change warning lights (they flash as the revs reach your predetermined ceiling). When you spin the motor hard, it even makes hard-edged GSX-R-type noises.
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It doesn't provide the mad rush you get from a full-on sports bike, but its 85bhp is enough for most circumstances; what it does do is deliver a lot more thrust at low and medium revs. The engine really is outstandingly flexible. It's more relaxing and quicker than a sports bike on tight, unfamiliar roads and, unlike older budget Suzukis, is smooth and sophisticated rather than buzzy and crude. It trickles along happily in high gears right down to idle speeds, although it needs to be revving faster than 3,000rpm to get moving, and gets strong at 4,000rpm. But then it keeps on going, right up to the 12,500rpm red line, without feeling too flat as it tops out. Keep it in its natural 4,000-8,000rpm zone and you will forget it's only a 650.

The chassis might have been hijacked from the Bandit, but you'd never guess that it wasn't purpose-built. The GSX-F handles beautifully, with balance and agility. Inevitably, there are times when you notice the 110lb extra weight compared with a GSX-R. Braking from high speeds, for example, takes longer. And trying to flick the bike side to side demands a fair amount of bar effort. At the same time, the suspension shows signs of becoming choppy when there's a poor surface. But mostly front and rear ends behave impeccably, while the upside of the additional mass is the good ride quality, an important factor for long-distance comfort. The bodywork offers decent wind protection too, the screen diverting the slipstream high, but it could use more width at the top. That would also set the mirrors wider, which would be handy - mostly they're filled with images of your arms.

As a sports bike, the GSX-F is certainly a fine introduction to the class, with its combination of forgiving engine and chassis, and the ability to excite, but some riders will find that ground clearance gets restrictive when taking the bike out on track-day circuits. Yet it has many qualities of a decent touring bike, too. We've covered the comfort (include passengers in that) and the low-rev torque. And with its 4.2-gallon tank and 45-50mpg capability, it's good for more than 200 miles between refills - gentle riders will likely do much better than that. Even the finish quality appears to be improved - Suzukis haven't always impressed in this respect. If you buy new, but have a restricted 33 horsepower licence, note the GSX-F comes with a second, suitable engine management box at no extra charge. There's even an optional centre stand, like bikes used to have.

Then there's the price: at £4,999 this is outstanding value. In the one, budget package you have an everyday commuter, weekend sports machine and summer continental tourer. This will surely push Suzuki even further ahead in the sales figures. And rightly so.

Engine/transmission: 656cc, liquid-cooled four-cylinder four-stroke with 16 valves; 85bhp at 10,500rpm, 46lb ft of torque at 8,900rpm. Six-speed gearbox, chain final drive.

Performance: top speed 140mph (est), average fuel consumption n/a mpg.

We like: Price, comfort, engine, handling.

We don't like: Mirrors.



Ridden: Suzuki GSX650F - Motorbikes | Reviews of bikes and scooters | MSN Cars UK

At a glance, you'd be forgiven for thinking the GSX650F belongs in Suzuki's superbike family. It's much sharper and more purposeful than its predecessor, the GSX600F which was fondly referred to as the Teapot due to its round, odd styling.

This replacement GSX650F is fully faired with the familiar Gixxer styled paint scheme and even shares the K5/K6 GSX-R1000's dual, vertically stacked headlight housing with the surrounding ram air look.

The instrument display has also been donated from the Gixxer range (including the gear indicator) but there are tell-tale signs that immediately distinguish this bike from its superbike relatives - the indicators protrude from the front bodywork instead of being integrated into the mirrors, the exhaust pipe's fat and round and the one piece seat and pillion grab-rail confirms the bike's practical character. It's an everyday bike that's managed to combine common sense with capability and the results are very impressive.

Suzuki's superbikes have an instantly recognisable image. They're so distinctive that many bikers dream of belonging to the family, but sometimes a Gixxer won't quite fit the bill. Perhaps it's down to a rider's lack of experience or ability; maybe it's the need for something more comfortable and practical. Or maybe they'd just prefer a bike that's less intimidating and cheaper. Hence the introduction of the GSX650F, which is an affordable budget bike at just £4,999 and the perfect stepping stone to the Gixxer range. However, don't assume that means there's a sacrifice somewhere along the line because there just isn't.

Powerplant


You'd also be forgiven for assuming it's simply a fully-faired Bandit 650. It is, but it also has its own identity and it's a quite different riding experience than the naked Bandit. The donor Bandit 656cc, four-cylinder power unit has been revised with different engine mapping to offer more power at the top of the rev range for the GSX650F. Where the Bandit tends to produce its torque and power low down, this bike has a sportier feel. There's still a strong emphasis on midrange power and the bike pulls steadily and smoothly from 4,000rpm.

This is due to Suzuki's dual throttle valve fuel-injection system where the throttle activates a primary valve and the bike's ECU 'electronic brain' has charge of a secondary valve. For really defiant overtakes and a more focused feel, you can stir the silky smooth six-speed box and keep the revs between 6,000 and 8,000rpm, only licking the 12,500rpm red line if the buzz of the ride takes over. During the launch in France, I was pleasantly surprised at how easily the bike adapted to my various demands.

Comfort

Pottering gently through the quaint villages highlighted just how comfortable the riding position is. The handlebars are, of course, flatter than the Gixxer's, so you don't have that poised-for-action stance, but the benefits are less pressure on the wrists and a more relaxed ride for your legs. The bars are also rubber mounted to reduce vibrations. The more upright position means you've a clear view of the road ahead, without the bum-up, head-down style of a GSX-R. Longer journeys and motorway miles are more manageable too.

The one piece seat is perfect for carrying a pillion and, although I didn't take a back seat myself, I did sneak a quick perch and I'm pretty confident the ride would be as comfortable on the back as it is the front. The grab rail is easy to find and you certainly don't have the sensation that you're sitting five feet above the rider with your knees up round your ears. The Gixxer-styled full fairing facilitates a healthy top speed and despite the wintry winds constantly threatening to blow me off line, the Suzuki triumphed in every way. Even when a sudden, albeit pretty, snowstorm tested the bike's weather protection, I failed to find a flaw.

Ride and handling

Testing the bike's sporty nature was a total blast. With the throttle back to the stop, you feel immersed in the complete riding experience without ever feeling overwhelmed (by comparison to the full-on sports bikes it visually imitates) and the handling is spot on. The suspension comprises conventional 41mm forks with adjustable preload up front and adjustable preload/rebound at the rear. I left everything as standard and pushed as hard as I dared in such cold conditions. But again, the Suzuki stood proud as teacher's pet complete with a rosy red apple and confident smirk. It's not superbike-taught, but nor is it armchair-tourer wallowy - it's just right, whether you're hooning around or merely travelling from A to B.

The GSX650F is shod with the same Bridgestone tyres as the Bandit, but the front is a different compound. The grip on offer encouraged me to indulge in the bike's almost split personality until my knee dug firmly onto the French asphalt and my grin threatened to burst clean out of my lid. The four-piston, Tokico callipers at the front and Nissin two pots at the rear had no trouble in rapidly reducing my mph. Actually, they were far more effective than my own resolve in scrubbing off speed. I had so much fun, I distinctly remember being disappointed when I realised we'd finally completed the test route and the day's ride was all but over.

Verdict

It's the little things as well as the rideability that makes this bike work so well. For example, because the exhaust downpipes are now trickier to reach compared to the exposed Bandit, they're are coated in a protective black finish to help preserve them. Suzuki has certainly covered all the bases with the GSX650F. It's perfect for one or two-up trips, young or older riders, sporty or sedate styles and like the GSX-R600 and SV650, there's even a free 33bhp restrictor kit available for novices if they buy the bike new. I'm not suggesting this bike's equally as sporty, or as focused as a Gixxer. But it is agile, fun and more than capable of dealing with whatever you throw at it.
 

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I just bought one, gimmie a week or 2 and i'll post a first impression ride. When I test rode one i didn't noticed the weight .

regards
jim
 

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Hi all,
I am looking currently to upgrade my Ninja 500 re-intro bike. As someone mentioned before, even though a Ninja 650 is a great bike I'd like to try something different. I have narrowed my choices to an FZ6S2 (2007+) or the new GSX650F. For those of you who considered the FZ6 and rode both, how would you compare them? I have an article from Motorcycle consumer news where the FZ6 beat both the Ninja 650 and SV650S easily. Now, I read this month's review of the GSX650F in RIDER and they liked it. I can't decide. Do you feel the weight of the GSX650F when you ride it? I do mostly commuting around Boston and short rides outside the city. My preference is for twisties rather than highway, but I often need to take the highway to get to the twisties. One small turnoff in the US is the lack of center stand on the GSX650F - I guess that could be added aftermarket. I know it is available in Europe as an accessory. I am a responsible ride, 35yo, 5'8" tall, 150lbs and am not looking to really push the limits. I pretty much never go above 7k rpm.
Thanks for any feedback,
Dani
 
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