Sport Bikes banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
457 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'd like to get an FZ-6 now as my first bike so I can take advantage of Yamaha's sweet financing, but I'm leary of the HP. DOes anyone know how I can get a hold of a restrictor kit in the US or simulate the effects here?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
AirForceTeacher said:
I'd like to get an FZ-6 now as my first bike so I can take advantage of Yamaha's sweet financing, but I'm leary of the HP. DOes anyone know how I can get a hold of a restrictor kit in the US or simulate the effects here?
Hmmm...not too sure.

What kind of riding experience do you have, if necessary? I suggest something smaller...for an inexperienced rider, the fz6 might be too much of a bike. I would dare say its more forgiving than a more sport oriented bike, but the power it can produce can easily get a n00b into trouble.

If you're hell bent on getting an fz6 (if you can find them now in fact, particularly around the bay area, cali) go for it. Its a great bike and I have no qualms with it whatsoever.

But my overall feeling for n00b riders is to go w/something small, if you only have an msf class under your belt. If you've been riding a bit, then that's a different story.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
I bought an FZ6 about three weeks ago. Was my first bike ever. I have never been on anything else but an automatic atv. No dirt bikes ... nothing even close. I sat in my drive way to get use to the clutch and first gear. Two days later i was up on semi major two lane highway in the area. The breakin of the motor requires that you don't go above 7000 rps so your shifting way before any kind of power band. I can honestly say this a great bike to learn on that you will end up growin into. The upper rpm range is definitly something you need to be ready for...but we're talkin 10000 and up. In the lower rpm it is (what seems to be) a very forgiving bike to ride. You'll be fine with out any restrictor kit ...in my opinion. PM if you have any other questions i can answer... I was in the same position your in. thought it might be too much to start out on. not true at all. just start out slow and you'll get comfortable rather quick. Good luck!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
It's tough for us to say what would be the best for you because every rider is different. I would agree with both 6er and IronChef. But it really depends on your prior motorcycle experience.

This is actually my first street bike as well. But, I spent a ton of time on dirt bikes when I was younger, so I was pretty familiar with riding at the start. However there is a huge difference between my dirt experience and the actual street. When I was on my MX dirt bike I was dodging stationary trees and such. When you're on the street you're dodging moving cars that outweigh you by 10 times.

I started out in an empty parking lot, getting used to the bike. Being in Atlanta there are a lot of huge office parks that have actual roads running through them, but on the weekends when no one is working, there is zero traffic. That was the next step. Then, over the past two weeks I've made my way out onto the side roads and am getting more comfortable with traffic. It's also helped me a lot to ride with friends in order to be more visible to cars.

Personally I can say that this bike was ok for me as a first street bike. Since I'm not a total newb the biggest adjustment for me has been traffic. And because riding a bike is pretty familiar to me I've been able to focus on being careful with the cars around me instead of worrying about operating the bike. As 6er said, they ask you to keep it below 7k RPMs to break it in so that keeps you out of the major power. But also as IronChef said, if you're a complete newb, and don't know much about riding at all, it might be a better idea to start out on something smaller.

Hope this helped somewhat. No doubt this is an outstanding bike. Regardless of the decision you make, be safe. Hope to see you out there. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
317 Posts
The FZ6 is my first real sport bike. It is terrific. It doesn't feel like it has too much power, especially around town, when you keep it in the low range. The flip side is there is tons of power up top if you need it. Zoooom.

I have had my endorsement for over 10 years, having had the MSF course in april of 94, but I hadn't ridden much since. I was on an old enduro back then, and after getting out of the service, I rode on my dad's cruiser a bit (Yammy RoadStar 1600, damn it was huge!). Never lost the love for riding, but definitely got rusty. I am over 1100 miles on her now, and I am getting comfortable again.

I think that you could get the FZ6 as a first bike, but just don't be afraid to drop her, or make dumb mistakes. It happens. It is a ton of fun to ride, and I still get a fun tingle of excitement every time I see it, and think "Damn, that's MY bike... Sweeeet!".

Get one, and have fun! But wear the gear...

-J
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
I think fazex brings up a good point. You'll be so worried about dropping it (and a bike WILL drop, usually your first one) that you'll become preoccupied with not dropping it. Part of getting a smaller bike is so you can learn how NOT to do the things n00bs do that lead to a dropped bike. Think about it. Would you be more at ease dropping a used 250/500 or your brand spanking new fz6?
 

·
Livin' on the Edge!
Joined
·
1,461 Posts
My first bike too. It is very tame in the low rpms which is where you should stay until you get really comfortable. This bike breeds confidence and so long as you can ride a bike, you can ride this one safely. If you get brave and wring the thing out though, it will scare the shit out of you in a hurry. Take the msf course and you will be fine with this bike and the best thing about it is that you will not outgrow it in a year or two years...maybe never.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
AirForceTeacher said:
DOes anyone know how I can get a hold of a restrictor kit in the US or simulate the effects here?
Can you use self-control? It works rather well for me=) Don't go over 6K and you're moving the same speed as all other vehicles on the road. Shift when it starts vibrating noticably=P

"Palm lower than knuckle" works well to control your throttle, given the riding position, too. You won't open it much as there isn't much room to rotate the wrist.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
I don't see how people can endorse a 600cc sportbike as a first bike. This is my 7th bike in 12 years and it is by no way the easiest to ride. Motorcycle riding requires skill to do it safely. They don't use 600cc bikes to teach the MSF courses for a reason. It is easier to aquire the skills on a smaller bike. I didn't say impossible, just easier. Riding the larger bikes in a straight line is pretty easy. Getting used to cars around you, looking out for obstacles and driving in traffic takes skill and experience. The throttle response on this bike is sensative, so much so that combined with a quick release of the clutch, the bike is going to jump. My wife can testify to that.. ;) . You would be better off learning on a docile 250cc bike. Get used to the controls so they become second nature to allow more time to observe your riding environment for dangers. It is just easier on a smaller bike. If you got lots of time, a huge empty parking lot and don't mind dropping your new $6000 bike, the FZ6 could be a good starter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
TecChrstn said:
I don't see how people can endorse a 600cc sportbike as a first bike. This is my 7th bike in 12 years and it is by no way the easiest to ride. Motorcycle riding requires skill to do it safely. They don't use 600cc bikes to teach the MSF courses for a reason. It is easier to aquire the skills on a smaller bike. I didn't say impossible, just easier. Riding the larger bikes in a straight line is pretty easy. Getting used to cars around you, looking out for obstacles and driving in traffic takes skill and experience. The throttle response on this bike is sensative, so much so that combined with a quick release of the clutch, the bike is going to jump. My wife can testify to that.. ;) . You would be better off learning on a docile 250cc bike. Get used to the controls so they become second nature to allow more time to observe your riding environment for dangers. It is just easier on a smaller bike. If you got lots of time, a huge empty parking lot and don't mind dropping your new $6000 bike, the FZ6 could be a good starter.
Very good points.

I never understand the reason why people are so inclined to get a b***** bike as a first bike. I think www.beginnerbikes.com put it the best when they say, "It's your FIRST bike, not your last"

The argument of "I won't have enough money to get one bike, sell it, then get a b***** bike" is invalid because of this primary reasons. The resale value of a ninja 250 is easily 90% or more. Example. I got my 250 for 2200. I put 1k miles on it. I sold it for 2100, and this is because I was in a hurry. I could have easily gotten what I paid for.

Granted, you're going to lose more money if you buy a brand new 250. But there are so many 250's out there, that it shouldn't be that hard if you spend some time to look.

And the 250 is a GREAT bike. Don't knock it because its small. If your ego is too big to not even try out the 250, then I don't think you should be riding at all. It's not the most technologically advanced, quick off the line bike there is, but damn it, its a blast to ride, easy to maintain, and you'll easily get 50mpg on that bugger.

We supporters of 'starting off small' aren't telling you to do so because we're jealous of people that started off big while we didn't. We want all new bikers to enjoy riding and be safe while doing it. There's no better way to do so than starting off small.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,855 Posts
TecChrstn said:
I don't see how people can endorse a 600cc sportbike as a first bike. This is my 7th bike in 12 years and it is by no way the easiest to ride. Motorcycle riding requires skill to do it safely. They don't use 600cc bikes to teach the MSF courses for a reason. It is easier to aquire the skills on a smaller bike. I didn't say impossible, just easier. Riding the larger bikes in a straight line is pretty easy. Getting used to cars around you, looking out for obstacles and driving in traffic takes skill and experience. The throttle response on this bike is sensative, so much so that combined with a quick release of the clutch, the bike is going to jump. My wife can testify to that.. ;) . You would be better off learning on a docile 250cc bike. Get used to the controls so they become second nature to allow more time to observe your riding environment for dangers. It is just easier on a smaller bike. If you got lots of time, a huge empty parking lot and don't mind dropping your new $6000 bike, the FZ6 could be a good starter.
Two reasons 600cc bikes are not used during the MSF is one...it's done in a parking lot....and two...you never really know who is going to be grabbing the handle bars. From my experiences, there are some people that are mentally ready for a 600cc as a first bike (rational and self control come to mind) and some people that are definitely not!

I took the MSF with a lady that wanted to ride with her hubby and she was planning on getting a sportster (883cc). She did horribly on the riding test cause she (can't say dumb) didn't have enough wits about her to understand what was happening. She dropped a 250cc bike 3 or 4 times and kept the throttle pinned while the bike was on the ground! That's always a good one to see (good laugh)! She couldn't handle the situation she got herself into. Believe it or not, the instructor passed her riding portion of the test but she failed the written! Thanks be to that! Hate to see her out on the road or even worse in a casket.

This FZ6 is my first owner. I've rode a 250 a couple times. I respect the bikes power and know my ability when it comes to motorcycling. I consider this bike my starter that will never grow old. Definite keeper. All points above are warranted. (ample manageable power under 6k...etc...)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
I think it really deponds on the person, my fz6 is the first bike ive owned but ive been riding/racing atv for several years and i used to ride my buddies zx9 quite a bit. it all depends on the person and whether or not they are willing to respect the machine and take time to learn and ride.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,070 Posts
Sure, some folks have the ability (and sometimes past dirt/atv experience) to handle this bike right away. Some don't. If you've never ridden, how do you know? I bet the lady in ZeuSeason's MSF class thought she could handle the Sportster (I'll take it easy, respect it, etc.). The trouble is, you don't know that kind of thing in advance. Sometimes even a few days on a 125 in MSF class isn't enough to know whether or not you've got the self-control and coordination to deal with 90-something horsepower.

Obviously, the FZ6 is pretty friendly, and it seems like most everyone here who has one as a first bike is enjoying it. Still, there is less uncertainty and risk if you just start out small. Besides, as a brand new rider, you may decide to switch bike types altogether after riding for a little bit. You'll take less of a hit on a used bike if you do.

In the end, whatever works for you...

Anthony
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
I'd recommend a 100 to 200cc bike for a first timer that isn't going to be taking the freeways or autobaun any time. They are really tame and kinda lame but they get the job done and are really hard to wheelie unless your trying. It may be something you outgrow after a week or 2 with the limited speeds but not with an FZ6. It would make a great first bike for an adult that has to commute on freeways or is interested in 2 uping it on the weekends with a picknic basket in the saddle bags. The power band is tame enough for a newbie below 5,000 rpm and by the time you get it into 3rd above that rpm you'll be breaking the law in most city streets anyway. I took the motorcycle safety course and the DMV tests 30 years ago on my Honda 125 single thumper and had no trouble turning lock to lock 8's in first gear or navigating the cones. If your still interested in the FZ6 then that is the one you should buy not an R6 or FZ1.
A Honda Rebel is something I would put a first timer like my wife on if she ever gets over being such a sissy and wanted to join the 2 wheel club but since she has trouble riding her Schwinn on a busy street in the bike lane I don't expect that to ever happen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
my $0.02

The FZ6 was my first bike and I have to say that it has worked great for me. I had not ridden more the twice before I took the MSF class and both times were maybe 15 years ago. The thing I like about the FZ6 is, like it has been stated before, if you keep the rpms low, the bike is pretty tame. You have to rev it up high before the power surge comes in and that worked well for me when I was starting. That said, it did take a while to be comfortable with high traffic situations and highway riding, but I don't think the bike had a lot to do with that.

I would advise anyone coming into to take the MSF course and read as much as you can. Proficient Motorcycling and Sportbike Riding Techniques came in handy for me. However, the most important thing IMHO is to be totally honest with yourself about your ability and comfort at each step of the process.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I got this bike as my first, I have grown up riding dirtbikes, although that is a much different riding style. I agree with what many say, it really depends on the person. If you are an idiot and try and do wheelies or push it over 7000rpm or are just not a good rider, than this is a bad bike for you. If on the other hand you plan on taking it easy and not exploring the power until you are well ready than it is a great investment because you wont outgrow this bike and there will always be more to give. What really helps is that the engine break in ensures you keep her purring below 7000 rpm until around 1,000 miles. Personally, I don't plan to use that power until way down the road, and only in optimal conditions. Most of the riding I do is commuting, but I have taken my girlfriend and a few heavier friends on the bike, and I have had no problems with control, the bike seems relatively forgiving and a great cross of comfort and performance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
155 Posts
I couldn't imagine buying an FZ6 as a first bike, unless I was totally sure what I was getting into. Like others have said, if you've taken the MSF and feel comfortable in your basic skills, it's your money if you drop it or decide later that you really aren't into the sport.

This will be my first bike I've owned, and my first sportbike. Luckly, I had parents that were into bikes when I was younger so I learned to ride on an 883 Harley Sportster, which was brand spankin' new. I was nervous about dropping it, so I worked very hard to hone my cornering, braking, and defensive riding techniques from the minute I sat down. If this is your first bike, you will probably feel the same. Start slow. I wasn't out tearing up the highways for a couple of months of mixed riding. I eventually moved up to my dad's 1200, which was very quick and handled slightly different. I'm glad that I took an interest years ago and learned to ride, but I've been out of it for 3 years so I'm expecting a slight learning curve when I pick up my FZ on Thursday.

Good luck, and take the MSF first. :D
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top