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I'm posting this because I think its important for us as riders to know the risks we take. This guy was an acquaintence of mine. We were at Summit Point together about a month ago. He was hands down the best rider I have ever seen, but unfortunately made some poor decisions. I'm guessing this accident was his fault, but we all know what adrenaline can do to our judgement on occassion. He was a good man and I'm sorry he died.

Chris
'03 636
'02 YZ125

The following is from the Baltimore Sun newspaper:


Police identify victim of motorcycle crash

ESSEX - A motorcyclist killed Saturday night in a crash on the outer loop of the Beltway was identified by police yesterday as a 32-year-old Abingdon man.

Kevin Michael Anderson of the 1400 block of Valley Forge Way was operating a 2001 Suzuki when the bike slammed into the rear of a 2001 Toyota pickup about 9 p.m. near Chesaco Avenue.

Witnesses told police that they saw the motorcycle traveling at high speed shortly before the crash. Police said Anderson was thrown into a concrete Jersey barrier and died at the scene. Occupants of the pickup were not injured, police said.
 

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What risks? Sounds like he wasn't managing them. God, I am getting tired of reading this stuff. This is the third one I know of in this area in a month and you want to know something, I have no pity.

If you lack the discipline to control that right hand in traffic and treat the road as your own personal racetrack, stunt course or drag strip, you deserve anything coming to you. Is it so damn hard to keep the speed in the 55-70mph range (which is flowing with traffic around here most of the time on the Beltway) and ride with some intelligence and caution? I've seen squids lane split on the Beltway here doing at least 75mph. I've seen morons hammer by at a good 20mph faster than traffic beside them. I've seen these idiots weaving in packs in and out of traffic, again, well beyond the speed of everyone else. Let's just pre-dig some six foot holes and get them ready.

Obviously he wasn't such a good rider because he's dead! He should have kept it at the track where at least I could have helped pick him up.
 

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linuxbikr said:
What risks? Sounds like he wasn't managing them. God, I am getting tired of reading this stuff. This is the third one I know of in this area in a month and you want to know something, I have no pity.

If you lack the discipline to control that right hand in traffic and treat the road as your own personal racetrack, stunt course or drag strip, you deserve anything coming to you. Is it so damn hard to keep the speed in the 55-70mph range (which is flowing with traffic around here most of the time on the Beltway) and ride with some intelligence and caution? I've seen squids lane split on the Beltway here doing at least 75mph. I've seen morons hammer by at a good 20mph faster than traffic beside them. I've seen these idiots weaving in packs in and out of traffic, again, well beyond the speed of everyone else. Let's just pre-dig some six foot holes and get them ready.

Obviously he wasn't such a good rider because he's dead! He should have kept it at the track where at least I could have helped pick him up.



Kind of conflicts with what you've said earlier:

linuxbikr said:
Because he knew the risks involved in his behavior. Acknowledged and accepted them, in fact. While I personally disagree with his riding style, they were his choices to make and I respect anyone who has the integrity to stand up and say "This is how I chose to act, I know it is dangerous but it is my choice to live my life like this.". I believe he said he was placing his fate in the hands of God whenever he did such a stunt. I think he actually said that in Motorcycle Mania 2. Well, this time God decided it was time for Larry to come home.

If a squid on a liter bike opts to go lidless and blast down the highway in a blaze of glory both knowing the risks involved and truly acknowledging them (hey, the odds are good if I screw up I am going to die for this), then whether I agree with them or not, it was their choice to make. Sadly, too many people make those choices out of fashion, ignorance or just plain stupidity.

I respect Indian Larry for the things he did, not how he rode. But I will defend anyone who stands up for their choices, right or wrong and especially when it goes against the crowd because it takes strength to stand out than it does to conform.

RIP, Indian Larry.
Apparently it was his choice to make too. And I'm sure his thoughts were:

"This is how I chose to act, I know it is dangerous but it is my choice to live my life like this.".
as well.
 

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RIP.

Life is nothing but a "cop and a blow".. One thing for sure, we are all going to leave this mother at one time or another, and as far as I know we ain't coming back this way no more, at least with two legs.

So, what do you do?

Well, Me, myself, and I, are going to live every phuckin second of this chit. Yeah, this rider might have done something stupid, running into the back of a car, but it could have been where he was just sitting at a light, and a runaway car takes him out.

Phuck how it happened. May he rest in peace, and ride with the riders in the sky. In the meantime people, live, live, and live..

ceh
 

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too bad, I feel sorry for you, his friend, and his family.

If this guy was an example of "the best rider I know" I suggest you re-evaluate the criteria for what constitutes a "best rider" because the "best riders" I know are still around to ride with me..

I see this crap happening all the time - what a stoopid risk and what a waste.
 
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