Sport Bikes banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I found a 2001 model bike that has less than 1000 miles on it. The owner claims it sat in storage for two years but just had a tune up and a new battery put in. How would the bike be effected from this long-term lack of use?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
Usually the worst is gummed up carbs or clogged injectors, but it soulds like its prolly running fine. test it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
The tires could be a little cracked and/or flat-spotted, unless it was stored on stands. Inspect the rubber hoses for cracks as well.

As already mentioned - the carbs/injectors could be gummed up from gasoline deteriorating inside.

It's conceivable, though rare, that engine internals could have corroded a little.


But if a shop's gone over it, and it seems to be running well, then it's probably fine.

Scott :)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,633 Posts
Change the tires and all of the fluids, and most of the time everything's OK...Note I said MOST :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
or maybe its odometer fraud.

Did you look at the bike. It shouldn't have any stone chips. Try to look behind front sproket cover to see how much chain lube is caked in there. I would imagine in 1000 miles it shouldn't be much.

Why would you store a bike for 2 years? Most people would realize that it will lose a lot of resale value.
 

·
old member
Joined
·
13,079 Posts
L8 Braker said:
Change the tires and all of the fluids, and most of the time everything's OK...Note I said MOST :eek:
+1 to that. Most bikes call for coolant and brake fluid change every 2 years or so in addition to the more frequent oil/filter changes. Getting the carbs or injection throttle body cleaned and gaskets replaced is probably the most important part. If the engine runs well, though, it's probably OK.

There is a growing body of evidence that tires deteriorate over time (a year or two) and should not be used if older than that even if never mounted on a bike. Tires now have manufacture dates on them (year/month), but I don't know how long that's been the case.

There are a lot of reasons why someone may have kept a bike in storage for that long, but make sure the owner can provide receipts showing the work done or adjust the price to compensate you for having it done. For your protection, if your state has an odometer statement that the seller has to sign, make sure he does sign it. If it's not required in your state, write up a bill of sale for him to sign which includes statements of interest to you. Get his driver's license number for ID so you can find him later if necessary. If the seller balks at any of this without very good reason, run. If he lies, you've at least got it in writing which would make a good fraud case if necessary.
 

·
DT is happy it snowed
Joined
·
1,582 Posts
Make sure to change the oil right away too. I would want to know that fresh stuff is in there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
522 Posts
tires and lube like everybody said. When I first bought my bike, the tires were dry rotted to hell and I didn't have the money to replace them right away. Scary as hell to think that your front tire could blow any minute.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top