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What to do?

I have a 18 month old German Shepherd, raised from a pup. (registered)

As a pup she mingled with people often & she is great with me & my family/inlaws.

And that's where it ends..
.
.
.
She goes ape shit crazy at strangers, kids walking down the street, any thing,anybody!

& when I say crazy, I mean wanting to attack, rip your freakin arm
off Cujo crazy!

Now the protection/security she offers for my family/house is nice yet, no one wants a unfriendly, mean ass dog?

She was not trained to be this way at all, as I have been reading & accused of being a bad owner on other boards. Bad owner..WTF?

My last dog was a Lab I had for 10 yrs & was the most friendly to anybody, lovable dog Ive seen.
Our vet just said some breeds are more aggressive & territorial than others.
Duh...
 

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What to do?

I have a 18 month old German Shepherd, raised from a pup. (registered)

As a pup she mingled with people often & she is great with me & my family/inlaws.

And that's where it ends..
.
.
.
She goes ape shit crazy at strangers, kids walking down the street, any thing,anybody!

& when I say crazy, I mean wanting to attack, rip your freakin arm
off Cujo crazy!

Now the protection/security she offers for my family/house is nice yet, no one wants a unfriendly, mean ass dog?

She was not trained to be this way at all, as I have been reading & accused of being a bad owner on other boards. Bad owner..WTF?

My last dog was a Lab I had for 10 yrs & was the most friendly to anybody, lovable dog Ive seen.
Our vet just said some breeds are more aggressive & territorial than others.
Duh...
My lab is exactly how you describe your Shepherd, sometimes its just luck of the draw.
 

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have you tried taking her out of what she considers "her" territory. Then forcing her into a submissive pose (i use roled on the back with the jaw held shut), and introducing her to people. obviously the people will have to know what you are doing.

also you might try advanced obediance, adgility, and herding training. Intelegent, assertive, and active dogs often love this kind of stuff, it gives them a since of purpose.

it can also help the dog stay under your controll when meeting new people. Then you can give it comands, and the desire to do what you tell it to will overide its "defend pack" desire.
 

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ive always been a fan of the those chains you can tie a leash to. It lets the dog have like a 30 x60 yard run around area but also limits it ability to leave your yard.

I dont know what they are called, basically tie a leash to a chain between two trees and the leash runs along the chain.
 

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Okie. First off, kudos for spelling Shepherd right. I get so tired of owners spelling it Shepard, or some other variation.

I've trained LE dogs for 28 years with the vast majority Shepherds. Shepherds are known as one of the most loyal dogs in the canine world. With loyalty comes the desire to protect its master, or those close to him. Fixing this can be tough but it is possible. I haven't read ahead so if others have suggested the same just ignore.
You'll need some strangers to the dog but someone who is confident with dogs. This of course makes it difficult for you. The dog needs to see that his behavior does not cause people to react in a negative way and he needs to behave. If I met with you I would actually take the leash from you and make the dog do some obedience then reward him for doing well. I realize setting this up will be hard.
You might look for a trainer in your area that comes recommended in situations like this. There are some good trainers out here and there are some who have no business touching a dog. You might start with the below link and see if they can help in finding someone.

Association of Pet Dog Trainers - Dog Training Resources
 

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We adopted a dog last may who once acclimated to the house turned into what you are describing, with addition to not accepting our cats into her pack. She was very docile at the human society but within that week turned completely aggressive towards some people (but not all which made it very hard to work with). This spring she finally got ahold of one of the cats and gave him a good shake (broke a few ribs, but he lived), so we decided we need to do something about it before she bites a person or kills one of the cats.

After a bit of research we ended up sending her away for training (Sit Means Sit Dog Trainers | Dog Training Schools & Collars). The trainers use an e-collar which seems abusive, but it’s not, the starting setting is no worse than licking a 9 volt battery, but you can escalate it if you’re not getting the results or need to administer punishment. We had been through three other positive only classes through the human society and she just wasn’t responding to that method (unless you had a handful of treats at all times)

In total she was away at training for 10 days, cost about $1800 but came with the $200 collar which has a no questions asked lifetime warranty, and lifetime group training classes that we can drop into any time to work on any issues. We have also invested a fair amount of time continuing the training at home to reinforce what she was taught. And so far, so good. She is a new dog, she listens, is calm when we ask for it, doesn’t chase the cats (she is trained to just lay down when one enters the room and does 50% of the time without command, otherwise just say her name and she will usually drop). She will still bark at the pizza guy when he comes up the walk, but I don’t want to break that as I look at that as security.

While $1800 is pretty expensive, it was really our only option. Returning her to the HS would have certainly meant she would have been put down (we had been in contact with a councilor there so they knew her aggression issues) and she wasn't responding to other classes. so we bit the bullet and wrote the check.
 

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We purchased an e-collar and have been using it with our spaztasic boxer. It works great when used correctly. Its supposed to be something to get their attention and focus on the command you are giving, not a punishment.
 

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We purchased an e-collar and have been using it with our spaztasic boxer. It works great when used correctly. Its supposed to be something to get their attention and focus on the command you are giving, not a punishment.
Exactly. Problem is an e collar can ruin a dog if used in the hands of someone with no training. I've met people who've bought them and started using them with zero training. Hell, I had them at my disposal at the PD but would not use them until I attended training with an expert and even then I was damn careful. Great tool if used correctly.
 

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Right, we always leave it on ‘1’ or '0' (beeper) 95% of the time that is enough just to get her attention. Occasionally we will have to step it up incrementally when she is being bitchy, but rarely do we exceed the ‘3’ setting. For reference the collar goes to ‘7’ and I have tried it on myself through the whole range. we were given a 1 hour class when she was returned on how and when to use the collar.

here's the pup sporting her collar and -oh so trendy- blaze orange cape.

 

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The whole idea of the E-collar is to distract the animal from its current state and allow it to return to a calm submissive state. This can be done a variety of ways. On my dog I just use a firm touch and loud noise, that's been sufficient to address his aggressive tendencies and even allow him to ride in the car.

If done properly most dogs will learn quickly. It is their natural state to be submissive to the alpha male, and that's you.
 

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The whole idea of the E-collar is to distract the animal from its current state and allow it to return to a calm submissive state. This can be done a variety of ways. On my dog I just use a firm touch and loud noise, that's been sufficient to address his aggressive tendencies and even allow him to ride in the car.

If done properly most dogs will learn quickly. It is their natural state to be submissive to the alpha male, and that's you.
right, but with the collar i have a 1/4 mile range and never have to raise my voice. i am now comfortable with her off leash in the front yard when im out there. If she decides to make a move for a passing car or is eyeing up a kid on his bike, it's just a tap of the button and low volume 'Greta, come'. no yelling or chasing after her... not that i, or any human alive, could catch her when she is focused and gives chase.
 

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Right, we always leave it on ‘1’ or '0' (beeper) 95% of the time that is enough just to get her attention. Occasionally we will have to step it up incrementally when she is being bitchy, but rarely do we exceed the ‘3’ setting. For reference the collar goes to ‘7’ and I have tried it on myself through the whole range. we were given a 1 hour class when she was returned on how and when to use the collar.

here's the pup sporting her collar and -oh so trendy- blaze orange cape.


I would make all handlers place the collar on their thigh and I'd push the button on the remote so they could see what the dog felt. I did it also on myself. Doesn't feel good once you get up high enough.
 

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that it does not. we used one on our lab/pitbull mix for about 3 days (she picked up quickly) and once you get past that halfway mark it's. . .well. . .it's mighty distracting. :D
 

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I would make all handlers place the collar on their thigh and I'd push the button on the remote so they could see what the dog felt. I did it also on myself. Doesn't feel good once you get up high enough.
i pressed it into my forearm, since i had pants on.
 

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i pressed it into my forearm, since i had pants on.

Trust me. It works through pants.

A tip for anyone wanting to buy and use an e collar. Put the thing on the dog everyday for up to 8 hours for 2 weeks before you start the training. This way the dog becomes use to the collar and won't know where the correction is coming from. If you put it on and get right to using the thing then everytime you put it on the dog knows and will likely react in ways you wouldn't normally see.
 

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Have a pittie that I got around a year ago when she was four months old. She does exactly what the OP describes. In some ways I like it for the security, but she cranks it to 11. She is slowly growing out of it and getting more used to people. She seems to be deathly afraid of everything/everyone strange and does it more out of fear than desire to protect. Once someone new has been in the house for five minutes she's in their lap drowning them in kisses. We have one of those ultrasonic buzzers that only dogs can hear. She hates it. We only have to pick it up and she calms down.
 
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