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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I could use some advise, unfortunately my riding position sucks. As one member stated, "this is an example of poor riding position". Unfortunately I agree.

So, tell me how to improve. First track day coming this Spring.








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CCS# 616
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You're crossed up, get your upper body off the bike. Notice how your hips are off to the side, but your torso is still in almost the same position as a tuck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You're crossed up, get your upper body off the bike. Notice how your hips are off to the side, but your torso is still in almost the same position as a tuck.
Thanks. The problem is fixing that. While on the bike it feels like I am way off. Unfortunately the photo proves otherwise.


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CCS# 616
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It's a very common problem. My avatar is from my first track day, and I'm a bit crossed up in it too. What helps for me is focusing on getting my upper body forward and off, towards your mirrors. Try and keep the bike "pushed" upright instead of leaning the bike with you as you scoot your ass off. Remember the goal is to minimize the lean angle of the bike, not get a knee down.
 

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Oh no, your ass is way off..............Way too far off, all you need (especially street riding) is for your ass to shift slightly over (think an inch or two) and rotate your hips into the turn. Also make sure your aren't practicing your bedroom moves with the back of your gas tank.

Most of your body weight is in your upper body, if the goal is to lower the center of gravity- where does it make the most sense to get lower.........Lean your upper body into and down, this is lots easier if you open up your hips-your head isn't supposed to stay behind the windshield while your ass is on the footpeg
 

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Best advice, go to California Superbike School and get advice from instructors who are taught properly on how to teach you to ride better, rather than solicit information from a bunch of yahoo's who may or may not know anything about riding...

It'll be the best money you ever spent and have long lasting real rewards and benefits to your riding, safety and confidence.
 

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CCS# 616
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Best advice, go to California Superbike School and get advice from instructors who are taught properly on how to teach you to ride better, rather than solicit information from a bunch of yahoo's who may or may not know anything about riding...

It'll be the best money you ever spent and have long lasting real rewards and benefits to your riding, safety and confidence.
Totally unnecessary unless you're rich. Just go to a local trackday, the control riders will help you.
 

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Oh yeah because "local" track riders know all.... What a joke, what is there training credentials?

I didn't say it was cheap, although relatively speaking it is----I said it was best !
No doubt he would learn more in one day at CSS than attending dozens of trackdays and getting "advice" from control riders and other trackday junkies.
 

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What the others said regarding your upper body.

Look, lowcel. You seem like an intensely analytical person. Like when you went through my video and pointed out every second you didn't like something. I'm not taking it personal.

But if your analytical personality carries over into your riding, I would imagine your riding style is stiff and every little move is over calculated. I don't know for sure since I've never ridden with you. To ride well, you have to be somewhat relaxed and flow with the bike and the ride.

Just my two cents....
 

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Slo Tortuga
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There is always room for improvement, and some pics you may see of others with good body position, doesn't mean that they do that in every turn.

Enjoy your time on 2 wheels, listen to critiquing... Just don't pay attention to short comments like "this is an example of poor riding position" without anything to add that will help you out.

I would say yes... you could improve, many have already mentioned things I would have said. I would only add that you said that already feel like you're way off. Now that you have seen the pics, maybe you could try this until you get used to it:

- slow down a little bit to practice new technique (you dont want to be near pushing things to practice basic body positioning

- to get off the bike more, pay attention to your forearms and placement. Try and place your outside elbow "towards" the middle of the gas tank. <--this will allow you to not just hang off the bike with your lower body, but also now your upper body.

And remember, we can all give advice, but if you look at pics of the top pro's, there are all kinds of techniques. Even some that we would say they are crossed up haha but it works for them. Pictures and video are fun, but lap times don't lie.
 

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Your position isn't terrible, it just needs a little work. Your upper body is still leaned past the center of your bike, so you're not all that crossed up. It's just that your ass is much further out than your upper body. I wouldn't call your body position an example of poor riding position, but I certainly wouldn't say it's an example of good position either.

Try to get your head and upper body closer to the inside mirrors ('kiss the mirrors'), and work on your foot position. Your toes are pointed out. You should be on the balls of your feet with your feet more or less pointed straight forward. Also, in your last picture, you look like you're about to cross the center line or come close to it. Work on your lines through corners. For a street line, you don't want to cut so close to the center lines in a left turn or the right lines on a right turn.
 

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CCS# 616
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Oh yeah because "local" track riders know all.... What a joke, what is there training credentials?

I didn't say it was cheap, although relatively speaking it is----I said it was best !
No doubt he would learn more in one day at CSS than attending dozens of trackdays and getting "advice" from control riders and other trackday junkies.
What? Control riders are often expert racers. Chances are if the organization picked them to be a control rider, they know thing or two about going fast. All the money it would take to travel to California and ship/rent a motorcycle could be spent on actual time/tires at the track. This isn't a cheap hobby, you have to be economical.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks to everyone so far for the helpful advice. I certainly appreciate it.

One thing I need to get over is keeping my arm against the outside of the tank. Seems like that is one of the reasons my body is staying towards the center more. I'm guessing that strengthening my core some more will help me feel more stable with my arm up higher.

I believe I usually keep my arm touching the tank sort of like this.

 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
What the others said regarding your upper body.

Look, lowcel. You seem like an intensely analytical person. Like when you went through my video and pointed out every second you didn't like something. I'm not taking it personal.

But if your analytical personality carries over into your riding, I would imagine your riding style is stiff and every little move is over calculated. I don't know for sure since I've never ridden with you. To ride well, you have to be somewhat relaxed and flow with the bike and the ride.

Just my two cents....
I have ridden and race road bikes and mountain bikes for years. You can't do that and be somewhat successful by being stiff and over calculating every move.

 

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What? Control riders are often expert racers. Chances are if the organization picked them to be a control rider, they know thing or two about going fast. All the money it would take to travel to California and ship/rent a motorcycle could be spent on actual time/tires at the track. This isn't a cheap hobby, you have to be economical.
You do realize there is a huge difference in going "fast" on a track than riding at a brisk pace safely (relative) on the street?

You do realize CSS not only teaches in California?


"expert racers" at the club level are far from expert racers. Racing regardless how fast you think you are doesn't make one qualified to teach anything. I know plenty of "expert racers" that couldn't communicate or even know what they do right or wrong much less be qualified to teach someone else.

Just because Pro racers on totally unique machinery pulling closer to 2 g's than 1 g that most street riders will ever see look like this or that doesn't mean that is what is best on the street. Even on a more real comparison, what "expert" racers at the local club are doing doesn't completely translate to street riding- even if you are DCNinja and think THE GAP is a racetrack where you should go run as fast as you can.
 

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CSS;
VIR
Thunderbolt
Miller motorsports park
Barber
NOLA
Laguna Seca
Streets of Willow
Sears Point
The Ridge
Las Vegas

All these tracks were on the 2013 schedule
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
CSS;
VIR
Thunderbolt
Miller motorsports park
Barber
NOLA
Laguna Seca
Streets of Willow
Sears Point
The Ridge
Las Vegas

All these tracks were on the 2013 schedule
Mid-Ohio is about 3 1/2 hours away from me I believe. Summit Point and VIR are both about 5 1/2 hours away. Those are my closest tracks. :(
 

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You do realize there is a huge difference in going "fast" on a track than riding at a brisk pace safely (relative) on the street?

You do realize CSS not only teaches in California?


"expert racers" at the club level are far from expert racers. Racing regardless how fast you think you are doesn't make one qualified to teach anything. I know plenty of "expert racers" that couldn't communicate or even know what they do right or wrong much less be qualified to teach someone else.

Just because Pro racers on totally unique machinery pulling closer to 2 g's than 1 g that most street riders will ever see look like this or that doesn't mean that is what is best on the street. Even on a more real comparison, what "expert" racers at the local club are doing doesn't completely translate to street riding- even if you are DCNinja and think THE GAP is a racetrack where you should go run as fast as you can.
The point is, control riders can get you pointed in the right direction for a lot cheaper than CSS.

Anyone who is a control rider can immediately tell that he needs to move his head/upper body out more, and to tell him to stop riding duck footed. You don't need to go to CSS to figure that out.

Frankly, I don't think anyone should go to CSS until they have done a few trackdays. CSS is much more beneficial once you get the basics down and they can teach you some more advanced things.
 

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CCS# 616
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You do realize there is a huge difference in going "fast" on a track than riding at a brisk pace safely (relative) on the street?
What does that have to do with body positioning?
You do realize CSS not only teaches in California?
No I didn't. Yes, it would be significantly cheaper if the track was within driving distance.

"expert racers" at the club level are far from expert racers. Racing regardless how fast you think you are doesn't make one qualified to teach anything. I know plenty of "expert racers" that couldn't communicate or even know what they do right or wrong much less be qualified to teach someone else.
So you're saying all trackdays suck, they don't help you become a better street rider, and the people that run them are frauds? Gotcha. :rolleyes
Just because Pro racers on totally unique machinery pulling closer to 2 g's than 1 g that most street riders will ever see look like this or that doesn't mean that is what is best on the street. Even on a more real comparison, what "expert" racers at the local club are doing doesn't completely translate to street riding- even if you are DCNinja and think THE GAP is a racetrack where you should go run as fast as you can.
What are you talking about? My point was he can can probably find help with is body positioning for less expense. If there is one of those tracks near him and the extra coin, then by all means. I'm sure it's a great school.
 

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Try to get your head down lower. I found that when I did that, it forced my upper body off the bike more. In order to have good body position, you have to set it up right.

-Don't have your crotch touching the tank. This makes it so the only thing your hips can do is rotate around the tank. I prefer to have close to 3 inches of space between my crotch and the tank.

-Then I slide my butt off just enough to set my outside knee solidly against the tank, and open my hips in the direction of the corner. My goal is to square up my torso so I can point my spine in the direction of travel.

-Then I focus on getting my upper body low, and slightly straightening my outside arm in order to get the bike away from my head. Locking the elbow is a bad idea, but use up the distance that your arm allows.

-Last, don't screw it up by trying to drag your knee. Focus on pushing your knee OUT, but NOT DOWN. If I try to push your knee down, I'll usually rock my hips in that direction, which rotates my pelvis back towards the tank and screws it all up. I can tell if I'm doing this because I'll use my lower back to compensate. That is, if I'm bending my lower back from side to side, I'm generally doing it wrong. You can see the bend in your spine in the last picture you posted.
 
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