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Discussion Starter #1
Went to a track day recently. Found out that they don't allow coolant in bikes out on the track. Have to use distilled water instead. A guy at the track said that it's actually better for it. He made it sound like it was good to used on the street too.
Question is, is it ok to run it out on the street as well. Any thing that you gain or lose from using it ? Anyone run distilled water on the street?
Anyone have any knowledge on this please share.
:feedback
 

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at the track
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You probably won't notice the difference, however, you'll lose out on the rust inhibiting properties of anti-freeze. I suggest you flush your coolant and get a couple of bottles of a non-glycol based coolant such as Engine Ice, Purple Ice, or Water Wetter, and mix that with distilled water. A lot of tracks will let you have that in at tech, but if nothing else go right ahead and use distilled water, but make sure you flush your system at regular intervals.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hmm... good point. Didn't think about the rust.
 

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No. The boiling point of water is well below the boiling point of antifreeze mix. And, of course, you have a freezing problem in Ohio. Not to mention the anti-corrosion and lubricaton properties of coolant.

They don't allow it at the track specifically because of its lubrication properties. Its slippery and hard to clean up.
 

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No limit hypocrite
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Water is NO WHERE near as good as Coolant. Distilled water STILL boils at 212 degrees (more when under pressure in your cooling system), and feezes at 32... Coolant freezes far below 32, and boils way above 212...
 

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Water Wetter claims that mixing it with distilled water provides better cooling, lubrication, and inhibits rust/corrosion. I'm not so sure about the last two and they make no claim about freezing protection. You don't use much, BTW. Maybe an ounce or two in a bike's cooling system.

Having said that, I ran distilled water with Water Wetter for a year or so after a track day (too lazy to flush the system again) with no apparent ill effects. It doesn't get cold enough here to worry about freezing, however. I've since gone back to a coolant mix.
 

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This is the best stuff (in my opinion) out there, Evans NPG (Non-Aqueous Propelyne Glycol - not Ethylene Glycol!). Here is a link to there site: EVANS .

There is a tremendous amount of technical reading available there on how good this stuff is and why Diesel trucks, Dragsters, the Military, and racers love this stuf so much. The short story is that it doesn't boil till 370*, it's safe enough to drink (though not suggested), and you will probably never hear your bike making those boil over sounds again into the overflow tank. Water sucks once it reaches it's boiling point and will create a steam layer around the cylinders within the water jacket, steam is a very effective way NOT to transfer heat, so the water rushing over this steam surrounding your cylinders does a crappy job. Evans NPG (not NPG+) is run 100% pure with absolutely no water allowed in the system preferably, it stays in contact with the hot metal surfaces within your engine for longer and will give you a much more accurate reading on your temp gauge as to your bikes true internal temperature.

The racing organization I race with (CCS) allows the stuff and I have nothing but good to say about it. This is a life-time coolant which has a lower freezing point than most anti-freeze and is a 1 time purchase. The cost is about $25 per gallon and you should only need about a gallon of the stuff (it's also an awesome Purple color). You need to flush any coolant out of your bike as best you can with water, then drain as much of the water out of the bike as possible (try tipping the bike way over from side to side to help get as much as possible - have a freind help or use a racheting tiedown attached to the bike and something solid to hold it from falling). This is where you have to have a sacrificial gallon of the stuff to flush with, fill the cooling system with NPG after being drained of as much water as possible, run the bike till hot, then drain as much of this as possible into a container to save for the next bike you need to do a final flush on (I put mine back in the original container and marked it "for flushing only"). This is where getting a few buddies together to all switch to Evans NPG will help to lower the cost a little bit, that way you get a quantity discount at 4 gallons, and split the cost of the sacrificial gallon. I hope the organization you ride with is knowledgable enough to allow this where you ride, good luck! :)
 

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I don't think anyone more then mentioned lubrication.. It's the coolant that lubricates the water pump so unless you like replacing pumps, I wouldn't recomend running straight distilled water.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
All some very good stuff. Thanks! Gives me something to think about. :cheers
 
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