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Hey guys, I'm new to this forum and new to riding. I've always wanted to learn since I've watched my dad ride since I can remember. This past weekend I bought myself a helmet and took the MSF course.

Upon completion of the course and being dismissed I walked up to my instructor and asked what kind of bike he recommends I get. Before I even finished my sentence he said "CBR600, you want a sportbike right?" and continued on some speel about how the powerband is different from an R6 and how I had over 30 years of combined experience between the two instructors telling me to get the CBR. "It'll definitely keep you happier longer. It's just a tool, it does what you say, i think you're mature and you showed good control, blah blah blah etc."

I'm not using this as an excuse to get a 600 of any kind, cause i've been a guest on this forum for some time now reading different threads from new riders wanting their first bike and I was honestly confused when he said this.

I feel like I could possibly get away with starting on a CBR since i've always driven a manual trans. car, and riding that rebel 250 seemed pretty natural. Although at the same time I feel that everything I've read just makes a 600cc sound like a bad idea, although I've never been on one. I want to have fun rather than be scared of the throttle or the front brake.

I went into the course thinking about getting the ninja 250 or 300. I've also seen a really good deal on a '07 ninja 650. I guess I am beating a dead horse here, but should I really consider a CBR, or go with one of the ninja's i previously mentioned? Also is there a substantial difference between the 250 and 300 that I should consider? Is 21k too many miles for a used 250? My daily commute involves 10 minutes of freeway (70mph) if that's a factor. Also the people of San Antonio drive like a**.

I'm sorry this is a long post, but I really appreciate any feedback, thanks.
 

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Get a cheep used bike like the ninja 250-500, buell blast, fz400, sportster 883 or a dzr.

Look a first bike is mostly a learning tool. You will drop it. You may crash it. You might not like riding at all. So why get you money tied up in a expensive bike?
Supersport and superbikes are race bikes at are on the street. When you first start driving you would never jump in a F1 car and hit the streets
 

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I wouldn't consider a newer 600ss as a first bike, maybe an older 90s model, but not anything modern. They tend to have very responsive throttles and brakes and are very unforgiving of even small mistakes. It's better to build up your skills on something that won't kick your ass if you make a small mistake.

250s and 500s are great starter bikes. You can also try a 650 like the Kawasaki or Suzuki if you'd like and can find a good deal. Decent condition 500s are hard to find these days in my area, it seems like the 650s have replaced them. Don't get anything too nice because you'll probably drop it at some point.

FWIW I started on a 500 cruiser I kept for 4 months and then traded for a Kawasaki 650R. I dropped it twice. The biggest thing is to keep learning, read some books like Sport Riding Techniques or the Twist of the Wrist series. Those will get you to the point where you can actually handle your machine.


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Also, I don't know how tall you are, but look for something where you can easily get your feet on the ground. I'm short but today I ride a 500 pound adventure bike that I can balance on my big toe because I built that balance up on lighter, shorter bikes.

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I started my son on a CBR250R with ABS. I am very glad he did. A Ninja 300 ABS or a CBR500 ABS would be acceptable as well. All are fun and fast enough, and you'll get good gas mileage as well. Don't let ego blind you into buying a first bike that is quicker than a Corvette. There are lots of young men who felt the same way getting physical therapy or worse because of it. Don't think crashing is inevitable, there are many things you can do to minimize the risks. We want to see you here for a long time.

And don't forget AGATT!

ps, why not talk to Dad about it?
 

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600 SS bikes are not all that's its cracked up to be in a big metro area. The powerband is way up in the rpm range, get a Single, or a Twin cylinder bike if you see lots of stoplights. These race bikes are misery in the city.
 

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Upon completion of the course and being dismissed I walked up to my instructor and asked what kind of bike he recommends I get. Before I even finished my sentence he said "CBR600, you want a sportbike right?" and continued on some speel about how the powerband is different from an R6 and how I had over 30 years of combined experience between the two instructors telling me to get the CBR. "It'll definitely keep you happier longer. It's just a tool, it does what you say, i think you're mature and you showed good control, blah blah blah etc."
I have over 30 years of combined experience, and the difference between a CBR and a R6 is the difference between an shot of whiskey and a shot of gin, when what you need is a can of soda.

KeS
 

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Another hand up for a traditional first bike. I consider myself a pretty quick learner, but starting on a 500 was definitely the way to go. My Daytona is much more twitchy and I can't imagine starting on it.

It's not like the less-powered bikes aren't fun. I still take my 500 on rides occassionally and am always amazed at what a great bike it is. It's so flickable (and 250s are even more so) and the power isn't bad either. You probably know this, but it helps to hear it.

I think it's more fun to climb the ladder of performance anyways. Starting out with a relatively old, analog bike with a few niggles really made me appreciate the razor sharp performance machine I have now.

As far as highway riding, you said you'll only be commuting for about 10 minutes on it, so in my (less experienced - probably put 300 miles on a 2012 250) opinion, the 250 should be fine. You'll be sitting at fairly high revs, but not the end of the world for a short stint. The 500 will cruise a bit easier in that situation though.
 

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I started on a heavy FZ6R, and wouldn't have changed it anyway. It was the perfect learner and set me up very well for my upgrade to a GSXR750
 

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I've made a bunch of arguments for starting small. They all fall on deaf ears. I mean, hey, I only started riding when I was eight and I'm knocking on the door of forty-one. What the fuck do I know? I mean, it's not like I paid a couple of hundred bucks for a teaching certification so I can get a part time job. I already have down the ability the spew bull shit on the internet like it's fact, but for some reason my bull shit is usually counter to people's desires. Add to that, there are plenty of people who are willing to say, "I started on a 600 three weeks ago and I'm already keeping up with guys on literbikes."

So, let me try a new position and see if this one sticks. A beginner's bike is kind of a jack of all trades. There's a local riding group and a lot of guys in it started on FZ6's. Not an ideal starter, but way better than a CBR600RR. What's interesting to me is, how their motorcycling interests change over time. And because they're not stuck on a bike that's purely focused on one thing, they can explore different aspects of motorcycling.
 

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You walked into and out of the course with the right attitude.

No, the 600ss isn't the right bike to start on.

Veteran riders give the grudging nod towards the Ninja 650r and the SV650, and now the FZ6R (not to be confused with the FZ6) as the absolute outside limits of what we would recommend for a new rider. While the three bikes mentioned above don't have the same twitchy, aggressive and panic inducing qualities as an SS bike, they are all pushing over 60hp to the rear wheel. And honestly, that much power is enough to get you into trouble in a hurry.

I own an SV650R. No power modifications, just a bit of suspension work to help support my oversized behind. Honestly? I'm looking for a beat up Ninja 250 to tear around on. Why? Because shifting at 10k rpms on my bike has me breaking every rural speed limit in 2nd gear and every highway speed limit in 3rd. I miss the ability to hammer my way through the first three gears without being in danger of felony level speeds.

I can't recommend small bikes enough, not only are they a better learning tool, in most daily riding situations, they are honestly more fun.
 

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I really hope the RC390 comes to the states, and reignites the small bike wars when the sales go through the roof.
 

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I've started on a Ninja 500. It's a lot of fun to wring the hell out of it on the country roads. Doing the same thing on a ss would likely land me in jail and have my bike seized. The 500 is a lot cheaper to insure, tires are cheaper and last longer, better gas mileage, etc. B***** isn't always better.
 

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I recently bought a second bike (not my second bike), a Suzuki Bandit 400. I don't understand why new riders won't give small bikes a chance. This B4 is so damned fun! Possibly as much fun as my F4i without the stupid levels of speed.

My friend has a Honda CB400F along with a 250 Ninja. He says he enjoys both of them at least as much as his BMW R1150R. After riding the B4, he said I had better keep my garage locked.

In addition I will say that you can get into a smaller bike a whole lot cheaper for your learning phase. Once you have some experience you can make a more informed decision as to what kind of bike is going to do it for you. You may find you need several...
 

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An SS of any size are amongst the worst bikes you could start out on, for many of the reasons already described. My main "PROBLEM" with SS bikes is that their torque band starts relatively high. Putting a new rider in the position of having to feather the clutch judiciously to prevent catastrophe. The other categories of bikes have more reasonable/useable torque curves and as a result are far friendlier to the novice than an all out race replica. I started on a 650, and I'm glad i did.

Hey old, I would love to get my hands on a B4, I've always heard they were real high on the fun factor scale. I think most riders wont consider a smaller displacement bike because of their ego, can't handle it I guess.
 

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Don't want to hijack but didn't want to start another thread for a stupid little question. What about an older Ducati monster? I just saw one on Craigslist near me, 2001 750, which I thought would be way too big but just checked it and it's not all that much power, only 62hp still a low seat height. I know 62hp is still a lot especially compared to 18 like I was planning on with a CBR250 but it's not much more than some of the other b***** beginner bikes I've seen recommended. Also, would $4200 be too much for it? KBB says it should be $2900 but it looks like they're assuming a lot of mileage whereas this one only has 3000 miles.
 

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I wouldn't pay 4200$ for an 01 monster. But it's not my money being spent...so I guess it depends on how badly you want it.
Low miles on an older bike can be worse than high miles. That means it Probably. sat somewhere ignored for years.

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Yeah, he says he bought it start of this season from original owner who let it sit for years. I guess he wants to recoup his losses on maintenance he put in since he claims he put a lot of money in.

Ducati Monster Dark. 3k miles All Maintenance done

I'm not desperate for it, I'm really not even ready to start riding until next spring but figured I'd check every once in a while to see if I could find a good bike cheap and while I've been pretty set on a CBR or Ninja 250 it's with the idea of getting a Ducati(or something similar) in a few years. No harm in trying to talk him down to maybe like $3000 I guess, that is as long as I'm not going to kill myself on it.
 

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Yeah, he says he bought it start of this season from original owner who let it sit for years. I guess he wants to recoup his losses on maintenance he put in since he claims he put a lot of money in.

Ducati Monster Dark. 3k miles All Maintenance done

I'm not desperate for it, I'm really not even ready to start riding until next spring but figured I'd check every once in a while to see if I could find a good bike cheap and while I've been pretty set on a CBR or Ninja 250 it's with the idea of getting a Ducati(or something similar) in a few years. No harm in trying to talk him down to maybe like $3000 I guess, that is as long as I'm not going to kill myself on it.
I doubt you'll kill yourself on it. You may drop it a few times though, and 01 750 parts are probably getting harder to come by (and much more expensive) .

But you're right, no harm in talking him down. The worst he can say is" no" after all

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