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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Can anyone tell me the strong points of each bike? I like both and plan to go for one of these eventually, after I get more road experience on my current bike.

Can't really decide. One major difference I notice is the Ninja has a slipper clutch which the CBR doesn't. However, the CBR has a steering damper (not even sure what this does exactly) but no slipper clutch. I know this is probably comparing apples to oranges, but if you could only have one, which one is more beneficial to most people?

Aside from that, I'll have to rely on other people's feedback on ride characteristics, etc. Would one be better suited than the other for a first 600ss?
 

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steering damper will help you control the front wheel if it starts to wobble or more accurately will help to prevent it from wobbling in the first place.

it's generally an aftermarket part. if you like the ninja and the slipper clutch you can always buy a damper for it. if you like the RR's positioning and feel get the RR. In the end it'll be personal preference I've mounted a couple Ninjas and they're pretty comfy compared to the planks that Honda uses on their SS bikes.
 

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shamster said:
. I know this is probably comparing apples to oranges, but if you could only have one, which one is more beneficial to most people?

Aside from that, I'll have to rely on other people's feedback on ride characteristics, etc. Would one be better suited than the other for a first 600ss?
As far as "most beneficial" what are you talking about? Track? Street? Judging by the questions I'm assuming you don't have much sportbike experience. I doubt that you'll notice much difference between them. The ZX6R has more midrange torque and relatively comfortable ergo's so it may be more suited for street riding. But differences such as in handling or suspension wouldn't even be very noticeable unless you're an experieced/track rider. Both are obviously fast so choose which is most comfortable for you or the one you think looks best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I will mostly do street riding, with future hopes of the occasional track day. I guess I just need to know which one is better at what specifics so I can try to decide which one would be better for me. I like the looks of both, and I can't really decide which one feels better. There are none around here I can test ride unfortunately.
 

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I dont think the cbr600rr has a damper.... Im pretty sure that is only on the 1000
 

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The ZX-6R is easily the best bang for the buck. You get much more than the 600RR for less money. But you also get less resale value, so if you are planning on selling the bike in a year or so go with the Honda.

IMO, the only advantage that the Honda has is the 'stellar' chassis. It's hard to say which would make the better commuter (besides the obvious - none of them) with the Honda's plank of a seat or the Kawi's aggressive position coupled with low and wide bars. Kawi does have an excellent seat. Even better than my former bike the FZ6 which had a seat made for seat time.

Personally, I say go with the 6R, but if this is a first bike, you better make your decision wisely! The 6R is a monster of a bike!
 

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The 6R is way more comfortable, but I still went with the 600RR. It will all come down to personal preference. If you don't currently have a bias, you'll become a fan of whichever one you end up buying. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
This wouldn't be my first bike, but my first real sportbike. I want to ride my current bike till the end of the season and hopefully get some good deals on the 05 when the 06 models come out, assuming there is no major changes in 06 models that would make me consider those.
This would not be a commuter bike, as I take mass transit to work in the city. It would be strictly a fun bike for the street.
 

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what R you lookin' at?
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DUDE, you've been riding what 1 mos? 2? ride for a FULL year, before you think about "moving up" you still have along way to go.....your "season ends what? in 3-4 mos........5- 6 mos of riding is not alot.

the only thing that matters on these bikes, is your what you think is best looking, cuz your skill level is nowhere near 50% of what the bike has to offer.........
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Nothing wrong with thinking ahead. I don't buy anything major without months and months of planning, so even if I don't buy till next year, I start planning now. I want to narrow my target bike down to one, then think about it for a long time. If I don't change my mind after a while, then it's what I really like.

I realize that people like to tell newbies to take it slow, which I agree with. But please keep in mind that some of us do like to plan ahead. So no need to grill someone just for thinking about their next bike. Especially after I clearly stated that I won't be buying it yet. And also, some of us learn faster than others. I can honestly say I'm riding pretty comfortably considering how short a time I've been on a bike. A friend of mine didn't feel comfortable leaving his townhouse development until he had used up a full tank of gas. I rode about 10 miles in a 25 mph residential area (with some parking lot practice) before I got bored and was able to ride around it without thinking about the bike itself. When I first started, I thought I'd still be struggling with residential areas for a full month. I thought shifting and using two brakes would be difficult to get the hang of, but it turned out to come very easily for me, whereas some people at the MSF class struggled with getting the bike to move in first gear.

There are also other variables. People also have a different sense of traffic conditions. I don't think any other place in this country is worse than NYC when it comes to traffic, and I've been driving through the city for years. Whereas other would freak out before even entering one of the tunnels on the NJ side. While being on a bike is nothing like driving a car, being used to various traffic conditions does help, and I do dare say that I'm more experienced with heavy and crazy traffic conditions than most people from other parts of the country.
Riding time and miles are also different for people too. I would bet that a person who rode 5-10K miles in 6 months would likely be a better rider than someone who rode 1-2K miles over a 2 year period. And to take it a step further, what if one person rode thousands of miles, but most of those miles were in unchallenging conditions (such as long straight open roads), whereas someone else may have put on less mileage but has been exposed to all types of roads and traffic conditions? Who is the better rider there? Hard to say.
While time and mileage can be a good indicator of experience, it is in no way the only one. The same goes for anything else. I may ask a person how long one has been doing something, but more often than not, I will take it a step further and ask for details. Some musicians have played an instrument for many years and still suck at it. So in that case, asking how long they've studied is not the only way to measure their actual performance. But finding out how often they've practiced, what types of music they've learned, where thye've performed, etc...that will start to paint a more accurate picture of their qualifications.
 

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Dont stress shamster... the illustrious racer x will not change his tune... no matter what the other person is wrong... unless they spend 6 years on a 250, then a 500 and maybe when they are 60 years old with 40 years of experience get a 600! :pisson

I just hope hes not so unpleasant in real life
 

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hanglowejohnson said:
Dont stress shamster... the illustrious racer x will not change his tune... no matter what the other person is wrong... unless they spend 6 years on a 250, then a 500 and maybe when they are 60 years old with 40 years of experience get a 600! :pisson

I just hope hes not so unpleasant in real life
Whoa!

Racer X, not at all. Sometimes he gets on it and rides it hard.

My position is the same relative to experience. As for your well exagerated time line of experience; Dead off. Racer X suggesting, try a year first before moving up are wise words.

When I started riding dirt before the dawn of time. My younger brother and I were not started on the neatest & meanest machine. There is a period of "graduation" that should occur.

These 600SS machines of today outrightly "out do" the machines I came up with like the GSXR 1100, Sling Shot 750's, ZX10 and the like. These machines today flatout WHOOP ASS!

Wise words, take several more months and get the most out of your lesser ride. Take an MSF course, even through their Instructor coursework if they would like you too. Begin reading Keith Code's "Twist of the Wrist" & "Twist of the Wrist 2".

Outside of this information and education. SHAMSTER, I commend you for researching ahead and not being an inexperinced and impulsive rider that might become the next stat for going with the neatest & meanest ride out.

Ciao!

:cheers
 

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^ I got the supreme lurker of all the moderators out! saaweet :)

I just hear racer x (well read) preach and preach and preach and preach and.... well you get the idea, and some times it just gets old. The fact is I 98% agree with him, but on the other hand, I just get tired of reading it.... At some point or another you have to let the person make their own decision (good or bad). And racer x just jumps on everyone right away without even really knowing anything about the person. I try to reserve judgement until I know at least a little about someone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Well, that is the point of this post to begin with. It's just for research purposes. I know I want one eventually...why grill me just for asking what will be the better choice WHEN I'm ready. Just like anything else in life. Every person has their own pace in learning and growing, and during that process, they often think about the next step.
I'm far from retirement, but that doesn't mean I'm not thinking ahead and planning for it already.

Also, not sure what you meant by exaggerated timeline. I never exaggerated anything...I will tell anyone I'm a newbie. I think I'm getting comfortable on the bike faster than I expected, but I never claimed to be a great rider. But my point still stands about how people progress at different paces, and time is not the only measure. In fact, the quality of that time spent is more important than the time itself. I'm not a bad skier now, but I'll admit it took me years to get decent at it. I sucked for many years as a kid, while other friends of mine who started with me got better a lot faster. One day, it just "clicked" for me and I was able to do well all of a sudden. So back then, I could've said I've been skiing for years and maybe it would mean something to someone, but the fact was that I still sucked at it.
 

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Shamster:

I'm all for researching ahead, but in MHO, you're creating an itch that you'll probably scratch way too early in your riding career. I think the point of getting a lot of riding time in is not just for the sake of "time" being on the bike, but rather the EXPERIENCE gained during that time.

There is no way you can qualify a few months of "quality" riding to equate with a year of experience gained. There is just not enough variables in riding you'll be exposed to and learn from in 3 or even 6 months.

As you get more riding experience, you're tastes in the type of bike you want to move up to will more likely change too. With that experience you'll know yourself and the bike much better to make a more informed decision. Right now, I think you're 'researching' way too early. It doesn't hurt to window shop, but doing in depth research with very little experience to temper and guide yourself with might just force you to do something before you're truly ready.


Just my 250cc's worth :)
-Scea
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I can certainly agree a few months of riding probably won't be enough real experience for most people. However I also don't necessarily agree with firm "minimum" riding times either. As I said before, a rider who has been riding for a year may just be doing a few miles around town on weekends. Or maybe doing the same straight open road all the time. To me, this doesn't sound like a lot of experience. My goal as far as experience is to go on all types of roads (pretty much anywhere I go in a car), and do so enough times till I can do everything instinctively. How long this will take, I have no idea. It does depend on how often I ride I'm sure.

Anyhow, true, it's probable that my tastes could change. However, the topic was just about the two bikes. I don't think there's any need to say a newbie is doing something wrong by thinking about bikes they're interested in. Most people on the Ferrari forums will never own one, yet they are still welcome to ask questions about specific models. They don't have to be "ready to buy" a Ferrari to ask questions about a car.
 

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hanglowejohnson said:
^ I got the supreme lurker of all the moderators out! saaweet :)
:eek:nfloor :lao

If I were the lurker supreme I would definitely not have as many posts as I do mang.

Carry on
 

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shamster said:
Well, that is the point of this post to begin with. It's just for research purposes. I know I want one eventually...why grill me just for asking what will be the better choice WHEN I'm ready. Just like anything else in life. Every person has their own pace in learning and growing, and during that process, they often think about the next step.
I'm far from retirement, but that doesn't mean I'm not thinking ahead and planning for it already.

Also, not sure what you meant by exaggerated timeline. I never exaggerated anything...I will tell anyone I'm a newbie. I think I'm getting comfortable on the bike faster than I expected, but I never claimed to be a great rider. But my point still stands about how people progress at different paces, and time is not the only measure. In fact, the quality of that time spent is more important than the time itself. I'm not a bad skier now, but I'll admit it took me years to get decent at it. I sucked for many years as a kid, while other friends of mine who started with me got better a lot faster. One day, it just "clicked" for me and I was able to do well all of a sudden. So back then, I could've said I've been skiing for years and maybe it would mean something to someone, but the fact was that I still sucked at it.
Exaggerated time line was in reference to johnson's quote.....By the time you're 40 you'll be ready for a 600SS.

Shamster........Please read my post again. My retort was relative to johnson's post relative to Racer X and other bits of info.

If read the bottom of the post. This was a direct compliment to you. :bitchslap

:cheers
 

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i think the reason why so many people dump b***** bikes is because they buy b***** bikes just for the fact that they are faster, they dont care about if they ever drove a bike before, they just want to go as fast as they can as soon as they can. i was told by people at my work that i was dumb for getting a 600 and i should of gotten a 1000 just because the 1000's are faster. then they said if they were to get a bike that they would get a 1000. its no wonder people dump them, b/c they are idiots, and not to mention they called me a "pussy" b/c i wouldnt pull a wheelie in the parking lot today, and "if they had a bike they would do them all day long" IMO if your responsible and dont plan to go fast till you really know what you are doing, a 600 should be fine.

(this post is strictly my opinion and i only been street riding for 80 miles so im quite inexperianced, but im just stating what people have said to me and i am putting two and two together)
 

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If you don't know what a steering damper is should you really even be buying one of these. Aand how 'bout that slipper clutch?

Apples to apples to apples... they are all about the same with your eyes closed, until you reach a certain skill level.
 
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