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Discussion Starter #1
Ok I have cleaned my chain many times due to the fact that I keep the bike outside (don't have a choice in the matter Army housing). Well I adjust the chain tension and for some reason It always ends up to tight or to loose. I just can't get it at that 1 inch (1/2 inch up and down). Now don't get me wrong I know what I'm doing. When I tighten everything up and go for a ride it feels like the rear end wants to step out on me. If I center up the bike and let go of the handles I drift to th right just a tiny bit. I is realy starten to piss me off becuse I don't want to keep screwen with the chain and end up wrecken it! What should I do? Is their any easy way to make sure the rear tire is center?

P.S. Don't give me any of that stupid shit about I should have bought a honda. If I wanted a bike twice as heavy and half as fast I would have! :lol
 

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Well, since you made fun of Honda, I'll try to help :)

The little marks on the swingarm are notoriously inaccurate. The way I usually make sure the tire is aligned is to measure from a point that is the same on both sides of the bike (I measure from the point where the rearset plate/heel guard attaches to the frame, it's the same on both sides for my bike) to the center of the rear axle bolt on both sides, and make sure it's the same distance on both sides. The swingarm pivot is a good point to measure from.

Another method is the "string method" where you wrap a string around the rear tire and extend it along both sides of the front tire. Tying the loose ends of the string to gallon jugs is helpful. With the front tire straight, slowly move the string on either side inward until it just touches the rear tire sidewall. Then, measure how far the string is from the front tire on either side. It should be the same distance. You can do a variation of the string method if you have long 2*4's to line up on either side of the bike.

In case I wasn't clear (very possible) here's Sport Rider's take:

http://www.sportrider.com/tech/146_0010_handson/

Getting the alignment/slack correct is quite a big pain until you've done it a few times.

Edit: BTW if your manual, like mine, specifies the chain slack while it's on the side stand, this will be different than what you measure while it's on the rear stand, so make sure to double check when you're done.
 

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I think it would take a large alignment "error" to cause the bike to pull like that. Whenever someone says "it pulls to the right", I'm always suspicious of the crown in the road. If you really suspect a pull, find a really level section of road like the left lane of the freeway or center lane of a one way street. The alignment ticks on the swingarm and checking the chain/rear sprocket alignment usually are enough.

As far as getting the chain tension right, be aware that on a lot of bikes (Suzukis especially) the tension changes (tightens on mine) as you tighten the rear axle nut. What I end up doing is measuring the slack with the axle nut loose, then measuring again after tightening, record the difference, and compensate the adjustment accordingly.
 

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I used to leave about an inch of slack in my chain before a buddy of mine, Dave Sadowski (Speed Channel) said this was too tight. As a rule of thumb he suggested to allow a slight bow in it when observed on the stand.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
ssallber said:
I used to leave about an inch of slack in my chain before a buddy of mine, Dave Sadowski (Speed Channel) said this was too tight. As a rule of thumb he suggested to allow a slight bow in it when observed on the stand.
Dude your a fucken crack head. I have never been told to leave a slight bow in the chain! Thats a good way to throw your chain or better yet strip your gears! Go back to your friend and bitch slap that assbag! :eek:

On top of it if your talken about the same Sadowski as I think you are then I think your full of She-at! A Moto-GP champ wouldn't give such assed up advice!

5 million bike riders say 1 inch. I think they are right!
 
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