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Ok Gents, so my sweetheart and I just got an excepted offer on a house. It’s looking pretty likely that I’ll have some overlap time with the apartment lease and house closing date. Therefore, I want to take advantage of the time and seal the garage floor right as I’m sick of staining the floors with oil spills from working on the bike and cars. I plan on doing this myself. So for those that have sealed their floors, what’s the best shit as for durability, and what does it cost to do a 2.25 car garage? As it may matter, please keep in mind that I’m in Wisconsin, and therefore, the garage will see a huge range of operating temps.

Thanks for the help!

Jason

Mods, I was not sure if this belonged in the general or open section. Please move if I've posted in the wrong section. ~ Thanks
 

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Habitual line-stepper
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i'd just go out and get some epoxy floor coating. I think you'll need around 6 gallons mixed to do a garage that size, but it should probably say in the literature.

I know Sherwin Williams makes some really nice ones, but menards, home depot, and lowe's also sell their own that work pretty damn good.

I'd expect the cost to be under $500 pretty easily, even including washing it with acid and everything.

It's been almost 10 years since I did my garage with that stuff, and it still looks great. Oil spills wipe up with rags. And this was in Michigan, so it should be similar to Wisconsin.
 

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Although I cant comment on what type of coating was used... I can say that the rust dissolving portion of a gas tank restoring kit ate right through the sealant on my fathers garage floor (oops)... leaving a direct trail from the tank to the drain overnight after it dissolved holes in the tank. Just something to think about if you ever are using similar chemicals and want to keep the floor pristine...
 

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I used U-Coat-It. It is a water based epoxy. Some prefer non-water based. Anyway, lifetime guarantee. Mine still looks great. No pleeling, no issues at all. Around $500 for everthing.
Holy crap that's the nicest garage floor I've ever seen .... does it self level? My garage floor is a mess. Whoever poured / finished it didn't have a sweet clue what they were doing. Differential between the highest spot and lowest spot I would guess at approx. 3/4 - 1" and the "finishing" must have been done with a gravel rake!!

Nice job there JK ... beautiful.
 

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I got the junk from Lowes...it looked really good for a while, but over the first winter it started peeling up from (I presume) salt dropping off the vehicles...I followed the prep directions to the T; put clear on top of it, and I am not happy with it at all. The garage I store the bikes in has a bunch of spots where the tires sit...so I have black patches all over, but at least it hasn't peeled up yet.
 

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ive used the epoxy kits from home depot with good sucess.

if you plan on using the floor to work on stuff id recommend not putting down the flakes that come with the kit. it makes it harder to find nuts and bolts when you drop them.
 

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The stuff I used was Sherwin Williams industrial-grade epoxy, not the water based stuff.

I used a roller to apply it, and it only took an afternoon. I had to wear a respirator while doing it, because the fumes were REALLY nasty.

But like I said- I have spilled EVERYTHING on it. I slid my 351 Windsor engine across with, WITH the transmission attached, and it did not go through the epoxy.

I used the sand grit that you dump into the epoxy before spreading it as opposed to the flakes for grip. It is not too slippery unless there is oil on the floor, in which case it's slicker than ice.

There is not a single spot that has come up. It's a 3.5 car garage, and like I said... I did it several years ago. Now that I think about it, it may have been just over 5 years ago, not 10 like I said.

I was spoiled, though... my dad had the paint leftover from doing the plant he managed. It had been sitting in the basement 10 years and one day he said: "kevin, go in the basement and get all that Sherwin Williams shit. See if it's still good, we're going to epoxy this damned garage. I'm tired of you spilling oil everywhere."

I tried finding the name of the product, but it's discontinued.

I would really recommend a solvent based product, though. I don't trust the water based stuff. We put it in the bathrooms at work two months ago, and it already looks like it's getting worn.
 

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That's why I said some people don't like the water based stuff. Actually, the real reason is because some of the water based material evaporates, unlike the industrial stuff. But you don't have to wear a respirator. I've had my floor down for about four years now, and it still looks good as new, just like in the pics. No pealing at all, and easy to clean. That's with cars and bikes and oil and gas and solvents and everything spilled on it. I did use some flakes, but I mostly used silicone granules for traction. The flakes are mostly for looks. Without silicone or sand granules, it will be very slippery when wet.
 

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I'll weigh in too, since i just did this a few months ago.

I went with the Behr epoxy from Home Depot. They had grey or tan available, or you can mix your own color if you do a 5 gal bucket. Since its a condo, my garage is kinda weird shaped. Its about 2.5 cars deep (single garage door), but its one car wide at the front, but it opens up and is two cars wide at the back. Square footage-wise, its a 3-car garage. It took the whole 5 gallon can to put down two coats.

The garage floor wasn't totally smooth, its got some texture to it. The Behr epoxy isnt really glossy like a showroom floor or anything, just feels like a heavy-duty paint. Its help up pretty well, but its only 6months old right now.

I still put rubber mats down under the kickstands of the bikes. My girlfriend's 250R is lowered and has a tricked CNC kickstand, which definitely has scratched through the surface once.

I've also since built a ridiculously heavy-duty rolling drum riser platform, and the floor has held up beautifully to those hard casters.

If I was doing it again, I'd probably put another coat down on it, but I've been pretty happy so far. My other option was to do that Race Deck rubber tiles, but this epoxy costed me $130 vs about $1200 it would have been for the red/black checkered tile.


 
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