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Discussion Starter #1
Hey, looking at buying a flat screen LCD TV hopefully about 40" and wondering what the best value is out there right now for the $$$... ?
 

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Get a DLP TV. Thier cheeper and have a better picture over the LCD screen at that size. Plasma would be a good choice, but it's expensive and has a shelf life. LCD screens are the best for the money under 30", DLP over that.
 

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Actually they make Rear-projection LCD's that look just as good as DLP's. I actually just bought a Sony Wega 42" LCD tv. I got it for $1889.00 Everything else at that price range was either 30" or not a name brand. It comes with a subwoofer in the tv also. Built in HD tuner, PIP, 5 HD inputs, 3 A/V inputs. And if you have cable. You can just put the card in the TV no need for a cable box. PM me for more info.
 

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I personally like the Sony WEGA series as well. Prices are really falling on them as well.

Another brand to check is polaroid. Neighbor just bought a 37in LCD flat screen and that thing is sharp looking.

Best thing to do is go to a store and look at all of them from different angle, etc. Good source for reviews is Circuit City. See if they have the TV you are looking for and read the reviews. Usually pretty good and consistent with other items i've reviewed.
 

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All the technologies have advantages and disadvantages. If you can deal with the "rainbow" effect inherent in the consumer single chip DLP sets, the image quality they produce is superior to LCD sets, DLP produces better blacks and shaddow detail because of the higher contrast ratio, and DLP does not suffer the screen door effect that detracts from the picture quality of LCD sets. LCD still has a problem with accurate green reproduction and has more red push than DLP.
 

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Rascus said:
I personally like the Sony WEGA series as well. Prices are really falling on them as well.
It's Vega. Honest mistake. Everybody makes it except Sony sales reps.

The V has a shadow underneath it that makes it look like a "W".
 

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wescoas1 said:
Hey, looking at buying a flat screen LCD TV hopefully about 40" and wondering what the best value is out there right now for the $$$... ?
If you are looking for a flat panel TV then the only options that you have are either plasma or LCD. Both technologies have thier advantages and disadvantages but I personally believe that the lower price of plasma in the 40" range makes it more desirable than LCD.

Of course, if space and the aesthetic sex appeal of a flat panel TV are not top priorities then I highly recommend that you look into DLP as others have already suggested. Most of today's DLPs are only 18" deep and they cost significantly less than similiarly sized flat panel TVs. Picture quality of the higher-end DLP models may also be slightly superior to the flat panels. But, if you just hafta have the latest sexiest TV, then LCD/plasma is the way to go.

I just recently bought a 43" Pioneer plasma so I'll share my own buying experience. My home is rather small and has a really small living room, like 20'*20', so I convinced myself that I "needed" a flat panel in order to maximize living area. LOL. Anyway, I considered getting a DLP and saving perhaps 1-2 thousand bucks but decided that I really wanted the cool factor of a wall hung TV. This forced me to wiegh the pros and cons of plasma vs. LCD.

I don't think either technology has a clear advantage over the other.

LCD pros:

Weighs less

No risk of image burn in

Uses less electricity according to Crutchfield

LCD cons:

Can be viewed at very oblique angles but not quite as good as plasma

Costs hundreds to thousands more than equivalent sized plasmas

Picture quality supposedly not as natural as high-end plasmas

Screen size is limited to only 46" for now

Plasma pros:

Available up to 60" $$$$

Can be viewed at any angle. This feature is very cool if, like me, you're always getting up and walking around to get food or use the bathroom while watching TV. With plasma, you can stand a few feet away at nearly 180 degrees from the screen and still see the image clearly.

Costs less

Picture quality is excellent. Plasma displays are slightly brighter and the colors seem more natural, especially footage shot in natural sunshine.

plasma cons:

risk of burn in. However, this risk can be reduced by just taking simple precautions. I don't pause the TV for more than a few minutes at a time and I don't plan on using it as a computer monitor.

Lifespan. There are reports of older plasmas dying after only a short period of ownership. Newer TVs are supposed to have a lifespan of over 30,000 hours or 10 years of regular usage. I'll probably replace the TV within 10 years so I'm not worried.


Finally, regardless of what type of TV you decide to get, I highly recommend that you buy a high definition (HD) model rather than an enhanced definition (ED) TV. Simply put, HD TVs can dispaly more lines of resolution. The new high defintion cable/satelitte channels that will likely become the standard for all TVs in the near future can only be viewed in HD on a HD capable TV. I fully expect all cable/sat. channels to upgrade to this format within a few years as most of my local TV networks and a good portion of my area's premium channels already have. Also, HD blue lazer DVD players will supposedly be availble within a year too.
 

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pwang said:
Looking for a flat screen TV? If you are, the only options that you have are either plasma or LCD.
DLP is also "flat screen". There are other options too, that you did not list, besides plasma, LCD, and besides DLP, that are flat screen.
 

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Eyespy said:
DLP is also "flat screen". There are other options too, that you did not list, besides plasma, LCD, and besides DLP, that are flat screen.
Oops, you're absolutely right. I meant "flat panel" in the above post and not "flat screen". I will edit it to avoid further confusion.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
dubbs693 said:
Actually they make Rear-projection LCD's that look just as good as DLP's. I actually just bought a Sony Wega 42" LCD tv. I got it for $1889.00 Everything else at that price range was either 30" or not a name brand. It comes with a subwoofer in the tv also. Built in HD tuner, PIP, 5 HD inputs, 3 A/V inputs. And if you have cable. You can just put the card in the TV no need for a cable box. PM me for more info.
Is that Sony model KF-42WE610 or KDF-42WE655? That's exactly what I'm looking for after doing some research and I don't believe I've ever seen a price anywhere close to that low. From what I read though Sony pretty much owns with their LCDs over other LCD manufacturers because they pioneer a lot of the tech. This one is heavy though, wonder if you can mount it on a wall. Nevermind, it's too fat to mount on a wall... Shoot, I really want to mount one on the wall.
 

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pwang said:
If you are looking for a flat panel TV then the only options that you have are either plasma or LCD. Both technologies have thier advantages and disadvantages but I personally believe that the lower price of plasma in the 40" range makes it more desirable than LCD.

Of course, if space and the aesthetic sex appeal of a flat panel TV are not top priorities then I highly recommend that you look into DLP as others have already suggested. Most of today's DLPs are only 18" deep and they cost significantly less than similiarly sized flat panel TVs. Picture quality of the higher-end DLP models may also be slightly superior to the flat panels. But, if you just hafta have the latest sexiest TV, then LCD/plasma is the way to go.

I just recently bought a 43" Pioneer plasma so I'll share my own buying experience. My home is rather small and has a really small living room, like 20'*20', so I convinced myself that I "needed" a flat panel in order to maximize living area. LOL. Anyway, I considered getting a DLP and saving perhaps 1-2 thousand bucks but decided that I really wanted the cool factor of a wall hung TV. This forced me to wiegh the pros and cons of plasma vs. LCD.

I don't think either technology has a clear advantage over the other.

LCD pros:

Weighs less

No risk of image burn in

Uses less electricity according to Crutchfield

LCD cons:

Can be viewed at very oblique angles but not quite as good as plasma

Costs hundreds to thousands more than equivalent sized plasmas

Picture quality supposedly not as natural as high-end plasmas

Screen size is limited to only 46" for now

Plasma pros:

Available up to 60" $$$$

Can be viewed at any angle. This feature is very cool if, like me, you're always getting up and walking around to get food or use the bathroom while watching TV. With plasma, you can stand a few feet away at nearly 180 degrees from the screen and still see the image clearly.

Costs less

Picture quality is excellent. Plasma displays are slightly brighter and the colors seem more natural, especially footage shot in natural sunshine.

plasma cons:

risk of burn in. However, this risk can be reduced by just taking simple precautions. I don't pause the TV for more than a few minutes at a time and I don't plan on using it as a computer monitor.

Lifespan. There are reports of older plasmas dying after only a short period of ownership. Newer TVs are supposed to have a lifespan of over 30,000 hours or 10 years of regular usage. I'll probably replace the TV within 10 years so I'm not worried.


Finally, regardless of what type of TV you decide to get, I highly recommend that you buy a high definition (HD) model rather than an enhanced definition (ED) TV. Simply put, HD TVs can dispaly more lines of resolution. The new high defintion cable/satelitte channels that will likely become the standard for all TVs in the near future can only be viewed in HD on a HD capable TV. I fully expect all cable/sat. channels to upgrade to this format within a few years as most of my local TV networks and a good portion of my area's premium channels already have. Also, HD blue lazer DVD players will supposedly be availble within a year too.
Good information pretty accurate as well. Ok since this is what i sell for a living i guess i can chime in, go with a LG, Sharp, or Samsung (3000:1 contrast ration = :drool )
 

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Eyespy said:
All the technologies have advantages and disadvantages. If you can deal with the "rainbow" effect inherent in the consumer single chip DLP sets, the image quality they produce is superior to LCD sets, DLP produces better blacks and shaddow detail because of the higher contrast ratio, and DLP does not suffer the screen door effect that detracts from the picture quality of LCD sets. LCD still has a problem with accurate green reproduction and has more red push than DLP.

I happen to make the DLP chips used in these TV's. The "rainbow" effect you speak of was not actually a "rainbow" of colors, it was the engine running the chip using to much green. All of the current models with the DLP use 3rd generation engines or better, eliminating this effect. Wait till around Christmas and you will see the price of these TV's drop further. :beer
 

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I wouldn't let the hype over the supposed "rainbows" visible in DLPs discourage you from puchasing one. Supposedly, only certain people are sensitive to this. I've tried to see rainbows while watching DLP TVs and have yet to see one.
 

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gungho said:
I happen to make the DLP chips used in these TV's. The "rainbow" effect you speak of was not actually a "rainbow" of colors, it was the engine running the chip using to much green. All of the current models with the DLP use 3rd generation engines or better, eliminating this effect. Wait till around Christmas and you will see the price of these TV's drop further. :beer
This is incorrect. The Rainbow effect I speak of is a visual occular effect inherant in the single chip designs that must, by virtue of being single chip as opposed to three chip engines, employ a spinning color wheel. Owing to the rapid small occular movements that are characteristic of our visual/occular neurophysiology, when this is combined with rapid macro movement of the eye, for example while visually tracking fast on screen motion, the individual red, green, blue colors that are combined to produce the range of video colors are disassociated temporally and spacially. Current technology does not provide a fast enough spin rate for the color wheels, or the ability to to make use of numerous enough color segments at current spin rates to prevent this effect. Some viewers are apparently more susceptible to detection of this rainbow effect than others, but the only way to prevent it entirely is with a there chip configuration with separate red, green, and blue panels, as in LCD sets. This will be the immediate future of DLP as costs for three chip DLP light engines decline sufficiently to move them from the almost exclusive professional/commercial domain into the home consumer electronics relm.
 

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Eyespy said:
This is incorrect. The Rainbow effect I speak of is a visual occular effect inherant in the single chip designs that must, by virtue of being single chip as opposed to three chip engines, employ a spinning color wheel. Owing to the rapid small occular movements that are characteristic of our visual/occular neurophysiology, when this is combined with rapid macro movement of the eye, for example while visually tracking fast on screen motion, the individual red, green, blue colors that are combined to produce the range of video colors are disassociated temporally and spacially. Current technology does not provide a fast enough spin rate for the color wheels, or the ability to to make use of numerous enough color segments at current spin rates to prevent this effect. Some viewers are apparently more susceptible to detection of this rainbow effect than others, but the only way to prevent it entirely is with a there chip configuration with separate red, green, and blue panels, as in LCD sets. This will be the immediate future of DLP as costs for three chip DLP light engines decline sufficiently to move them from the almost exclusive professional/commercial domain into the home consumer electronics relm.

New news to me, The only way to get that effect now on the new generation engines is by spreading your fingers and fanning your hand vigorously in front of your face, normal people don't watch TV this way. There is no requirement to have 3 chips, if you buy one like it, you've been had, other technologies havn't advanced far enough to utilize a unit with 3 chips and engines, and again, it's not the chip, it's in the engine that runs the chip. The new six-segment color wheel has 2 sequences of Red, Blue, and green which spins at 7200 rpm, this double sequence is refered to as 4x rotation speed. Giving it the effects of 14,400 rpm's.The further doubling of the sequence reduces the number of the population able to see it to less than 1%.(estimation by the Industry leaders).
 

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Speaking of rainbow effect....Last year I bought an Infocus X1 DLP front projector and had to return it, the rainbow effect was so bad I would get a headache after watching for a few minutes. I ended up with an LCD projector and it's much better for me, the only tradeoff being a little more screen door effect and a little less contrast but the picture is still very good.
 

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mikem317 said:
It's Vega. Honest mistake. Everybody makes it except Sony sales reps.

The V has a shadow underneath it that makes it look like a "W".
It's WEGA

Sony's new KD-30XS955 30" FD Trinitron® WEGA® Hi-Scan® TV produces images like no other. Featuring a Super Fine Pitch CRT, Hi-Scan 1080i™ Display, and Cinemotion® Reverse 3-2 Pulldown Technology, the KD-30XS955 brings you a visual that is brighter and more vivid than ever before.
right from sony's site plain text description.
 

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gungho said:
New news to me, The only way to get that effect now on the new generation engines is by spreading your fingers and fanning your hand vigorously in front of your face
No, that's incorrect. It's easy to see them by virtue of the physics involved simply with normal occular movement combined with sequentual color field technology. They are seen routinely, even on the latest sets. A three chip engine positively eliminates any possibility of the rainbow effect end of story, as there is no sequential color wheel technology employed in such a set. Your comment about 6 segment color wheels is bizarre, as if a 6 segment color wheel represented the current state of the art of the DLP single chip tv technology. My own single chip set uses an 8 segment color wheel, hello, and rainbows are visible. So this is news for you, fine, read the news then LOL. BTW, the rainbow effect is SO prominent on the sets with only a 6 segment color wheel as to be close to unwatchable with certain types of video content. The same holds true for the latest HD3 sets with the wobblation chipset, a technologocal step backwards as far as the RE is concerned. But whatever, you are the expert.
 

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007 said:
Speaking of rainbow effect....Last year I bought an Infocus X1 DLP front projector and had to return it, the rainbow effect was so bad I would get a headache after watching for a few minutes. I ended up with an LCD projector and it's much better for me, the only tradeoff being a little more screen door effect and a little less contrast but the picture is still very good.
The ONLY way that you are going to be able to watch normal video content on a single chip DLP video display device, be it an RPTV or a front projector, without seeing rainbows, is with a three chip light engine. All LCD sets, including FPs like your Infocus, are three LCD panel sets, one each for R, B, G.

BTW, my main HT also has an LCD FP, the old venerable SOny VW400Q, the first dedicated HT grade (not data grade) FP on the market. This FP is also the first consumer HT projector to use native 16:9 LCD panels, is capable of displaying a 1080i video source using a very good internal scaler, and minimized the screen door effect by virtue of the "Delta" off-set pixel array. I further reduced the minor remaining SDE using a Cygnus Imaging IMX processor in front of the projection lens. This almost completely fills all the interpixel space, eliminating the SDE. The only drawback is a slight softening of the image.

On the chance that you or anyone else might remotely be interested, here's a look at my Audio/Home Theater website, including my Audio Myths website, Psychoacoustics References, and Audio References:

http://2eyespy.tripod.com/
 

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Eyespy said:
No, that's incorrect. It's easy to see them by virtue of the physics involved simply with normal occular movement combined with sequentual color field technology. They are seen routinely, even on the latest sets. A three chip engine positively eliminates any possibility of the rainbow effect end of story, as there is no sequential color wheel technology employed in such a set. Your comment about 6 segment color wheels is bizarre, as if a 6 segment color wheel represented the current state of the art of the DLP single chip tv technology. My own single chip set uses an 8 segment color wheel, hello, and rainbows are visible. So this is news for you, fine, read the news then LOL. BTW, the rainbow effect is SO prominent on the sets with only a 6 segment color wheel as to be close to unwatchable with certain types of video content. The same holds true for the latest HD3 sets with the wobblation chipset, a technologocal step backwards as far as the RE is concerned. But whatever, you are the expert.
I guess the engineering dept. that developed the damn thing is full of shit then.
Only a small percentage of the population can see the rainbow effect BEGGINING with the 6- segment color wheel. Not everyone can see it, if that's true then why are they selling? I would like to see where it's written that it is routinely seen, even on the new sets.

BTW, I like your HT setup, nice job!! I've been arguing with myself about the Outlaw 990, I have the HK AVR 335 running Outlaw Audio M-Block amps through 5 channels and use the HK to run the 2 rear's. I built a subwoofer using the Tumult 15" with a 1500 watt sub amp, the box wiegh's over 400 lbs, I built it in layers. I have Polk RTi10's for the front, RTi 6's for the suround and monitor 40's in the rear. The center is a CSi 5.
 
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