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Discussion Starter #1
The battery on my bike is constanty leaking some of its acid. It's not crazy, but there is always a little spray on the wheel and tire from where it leaks out of the drain tube, to the point where the aluminum on the wheel and swingarm are visually slightly corroded from the acid. I've had to fill it up three times so far this season, although each time it wasn't yet much below the "minimum" limit. I always refill to the "maximum" limit, but not over. It overflows even when my bike is parked in the garage after not being ridden in a few days, and the bike cranks healthy even if I hadn't ridden it in a while, so that leads me to think that there probably isn't a short in the wiring anywhere.

This problem is not new. In fact, at the end of last season, the battery was basically almost dry, although it was still working fine even as I discovered that fact. At the time, I wasn't too surprised, because I had a faulty voltage regulator which was overcharging the battery and causing a few glitches. In the meantime, I've replaced the regulator and everything on the bike works well.

Could running the battery dry somehow have damaged it so that it overboils now? Or is there another electrical problem you can think of that might be causing this?

Or could this overflow simply be from heat? It's been in the 80's lately, but I didn't think that ambient temps could cause a battery to overflow.

Any ideas you have are much appreciated.
 

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King of Oilernation
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1,237 Posts
I think the smart thing to do would be to change the battery.
 

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Back in Black
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5,538 Posts
The faulty regulator likely cooked the battery.

Check to make sure it's not overcharging. If it's not, replace the battery (or buy new parts when the acid eats through).
 

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sounds like a faulty regulator over-charging the battery. Had that on my '92 Suzuki Katana 1100 when I bought it used. Kept boiling the battery dry.

Put a voltmeter across the pos/neg terminals on the battery and run it up to 3k rpm and see what the voltage is - if it's more than 14.5 then it's regulator.
 

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Time For A New Battery Cheaper Than New Bike Parts Because Of Corrosion
 
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