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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone beer of wine makers in SBN?

I just got done with my first two batches of wine. A 5 gallon Pinot Noir and 3 gallon Whitegrape/peach blend. Their at 13% and 11% alcohol. I'm not a huge wine drinker but this is fun and easy. They should make cheap Xmas presents as they cost about $3 a bottle to make. Also wanted to learn a bit more about wine and I can tell you I'm learning alot.

Hopefully my wife will be getting me a few beer kits for my birthday in November. It'll be nice brewing up 5 or 6 gallons of beer and then have the problem of drinking it :banana.

I wish someone would have told me this stuff was so easy and fun. Anyone else make their own hooch?

:beer
 

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Lowlife
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Yeah I homebrew...I have the ingredients set up for my next brew of a Young's Double Chocolate Stout clone. It's either going to get brewed tonight or tomorrow. I've yet to make a bad batch. Cleanliness is the key, you have to make certain of sanitation.

All the ingredients were about $55. With a retail price of around $3.75 for a pint of it around here, I will save quite a bit making just over 2 cases for the $55. The money isn't really a huge factory though. It's a great hobby and I get quality beer out of the deal.
 

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Whacha got on my 40 homie
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I make my own absinthe. The wormwood is a PITA to come by but when I can find it, the sh*t I make is WICKED!!
 

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Valiant Poultry
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runnin dis bish
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I'm making my first batch of berry wine right now.. It's on the last fermentation process and will be bottled in a weak or so. If it turns out well I plan to make a 5 gallon batch of it, but I didn't want to waste all the fresh blackberries that my wife picked if it tasted like poo.

I'll be making some beer after the wine is complete, but like you said I plan to give the wine as gifts so I'm knocking that out first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've always wanted to try it, but never have.

What kind of equipment do you use?? Is it just one of those kits thats available online??

Like one of these??
Beer Making Starter Plus Kit with Ingredients
AFAIK that kit seems right price wise b/c of the ingredients kit it comes with it. Try and find a local store near you that sells homebrew stuff. I have found that local stores seem to be very competitive to online stores and no shipping prices.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I make my own absinthe. The wormwood is a PITA to come by but when I can find it, the sh*t I make is WICKED!!
Never had it but always wanted to try. When my buddy went to Europe a few weeks ago I wanted him to bring a bottle back but he drank it while he was over there:bitchslap.
 

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Valiant Poultry
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I kind of like the idea of making the wine and giving it as a gift...that would be a relatively inexpensive but unique gift to give to family members and such on holidays.
 

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Lowlife
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I've always wanted to try it, but never have.

What kind of equipment do you use?? Is it just one of those kits thats available online??

Like one of these??
Beer Making Starter Plus Kit with Ingredients
If you want to start off real cheap, that would probably get you by. I prefer glass carboys for fermentation. You can find kits selling with the glass carboys also. I use the food grade plastic containers ( like you posted for bottling time only. Glass does not take on stains ( I generally brew darker beers)..Also, you can see the acrobatics of the yeast working inside of a glass carboy....this let's you know better when to secondary ferment or bottle/keg...plus it's neat to see how active each brew is and you can determine within a few hours when it stops/starts (assuming you are keeping track). It can be done with the stuff in the link you posted though. You could also use a couple of stick on thermometers...the ones for fish tanks are fine for beginning.

You could stroll down to your local brewshop and ask questions...they should have everything you need to start.

I would recommend to get a nice stainless steel pot/kettle to start off also. You want to know what has been in it. Clean it well before and after every brew. I think the most expensive pot I have in my house is my brew kettle....but it sure is shiny...and big:cheers..
 

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FZ6 Corner Carver
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yea been homebrewing for a while now... love it...

Yeah I homebrew...I have the ingredients set up for my next brew of a Young's Double Chocolate Stout clone. It's either going to get brewed tonight or tomorrow. I've yet to make a bad batch. Cleanliness is the key, you have to make certain of sanitation.

All the ingredients were about $55. With a retail price of around $3.75 for a pint of it around here, I will save quite a bit making just over 2 cases for the $55. The money isn't really a huge factory though. It's a great hobby and I get quality beer out of the deal.
hey man post up the link if you dont mind of the brand and recipe for the youngs doub. choc. stout i love that shit.... and would love to make some...
 

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Lowlife
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Don't have a link, but I can post the recipe:cheers...

6.6# Amber malt extract
1/2# 80L crystal malt
1/2# Malto Dextrine
1/4# Black malt
1# Chocolate malt
2 oz. Baker's chocolate....(bittersweet)
1/2 oz Kent Goldings hops (60 min.)
1/2 oz. Kent goldings hops (15min.)
California Yeast WLP001 (similar yeasts will work)
2/3 cup sugar (for priming)

-Add grain to straining bag and add to cold water.
-Raise temp to around 150f.
-hold for 30 minutes
-remove grain bag, place in collander
-bring wort to boil and add malt extract, malto-dextrine, first 1/2oz hops, and bakers chocolate.
-add remaining hops and Irish moss (if you use this) at the last 15 minutes of the total 60 minute boil time.
-Chill wort
-place in fermentor/add cool water to make Approx. 5.5 gal.
-pitch yeast
-Take hydrometer reading.
-Aerate very well
-Ferment at room temp. for 1 week then rack to secondary
-bottle after one more week or when specific gravity falls below 1.010
 

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A guy on a scruffy bike
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I've been homebrewing for 25 years. I started in college when my roomate and I made a batch of short mead (brewed like an ale, takes about 3-4 weeks) for Christmas presents. I'm not really a beer guy, and this was too beer-like for me, but pretty much everyone we gave it to asked next year if we were going to do it again, so we did.

Then my mom had an oversexed plum tree that would give us about 2 gallons of plums a day for six weeks in the summer, so I started making wine out of that. I've made lots of plum wine, as well as wine from apricots, oranges, kumquats, pomegranates, various berries, rosepetals, cherries, long meads, pretty much anything but grapes.

They've generally turned out very well, and been popular as gifts and as something to have together. For our wedding, we had our toast with our pomegranate wine instead of champagne.

The wines generally take about 18-24 months for the whole process -- from harvest to ready-to-drink. I've had very good luck with it lasting well also. Fruit wines are generally not expected to last more than 2 or 3 years, but I've had some, especially the plum, still be really good after up to 10-12 years in the bottle.

PhilB
 

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Valiant Poultry
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I've been homebrewing for 25 years. I started in college when my roomate and I made a batch of short mead (brewed like an ale, takes about 3-4 weeks) for Christmas presents. I'm not really a beer guy, and this was too beer-like for me, but pretty much everyone we gave it to asked next year if we were going to do it again, so we did.

Then my mom had an oversexed plum tree that would give us about 2 gallons of plums a day for six weeks in the summer, so I started making wine out of that. I've made lots of plum wine, as well as wine from apricots, oranges, kumquats, pomegranates, various berries, rosepetals, cherries, long meads, pretty much anything but grapes.

They've generally turned out very well, and been popular as gifts and as something to have together. For our wedding, we had our toast with our pomegranate wine instead of champagne.

The wines generally take about 18-24 months for the whole process -- from harvest to ready-to-drink. I've had very good luck with it lasting well also. Fruit wines are generally not expected to last more than 2 or 3 years, but I've had some, especially the plum, still be really good after up to 10-12 years in the bottle.

PhilB

Nice Phil.

That would be my biggest problem...I'm not a HUGE beer fan. Yah, I have a few that I like to drink but they are pretty bland and boring. Think Bud Light and you have the right idea.

But the wine, to me, might be the perfect thing for me to get involved in. Something that can be given as a gift for just about any occasion that is special because you actually had to put a TAD bit of effort into it...

How did the rose petal one turn out?? That seems like an odd thing to make a wine out of...
 

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A guy on a scruffy bike
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Nice Phil.

That would be my biggest problem...I'm not a HUGE beer fan. Yah, I have a few that I like to drink but they are pretty bland and boring. Think Bud Light and you have the right idea.

But the wine, to me, might be the perfect thing for me to get involved in. Something that can be given as a gift for just about any occasion that is special because you actually had to put a TAD bit of effort into it...

How did the rose petal one turn out?? That seems like an odd thing to make a wine out of...
Yeah, it's fun. I got the rosepetal recipe from my uncle, who's been homebrewing for a long time. Obviously, rosepetals don't have much sugar in them, so to a certain extent you're really making rose-flavored wine by fermenting a sugar solution with a lot of rosepetals in it. I've made two batches, and both were really fabulous. The first was a test batch, one gallon, and I was able for that to use only red petals, and it was a gorgeous color as well as tasty. The five-gallon batch I had to use mixed colors, so it wasn't as pretty, but still really tasty. The trick is that you need a lot of petals (about 3/4 lb per gallon), and they have to be organically grown, since rose bushes will concentrate pesticides in the flowers if they are used. Fortunately, my mom has a big rose garden and grows organically. I just picks petals all summer and threw them into ziplocs in the freezer utnil I had enough.

The one that was the biggest PITA was the kumquat. It was *really* good, but I won't do it again. Much of the flavor and sugar of kumquats is in the rind, so for a 5-gallon carboy I had to hand squeeze 15 lbs of kumquats through a garlic press, to get the citrus oils into the must, and pulp the rind so it could ferment properly. Ouch.

PhilB
 

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A guy on a scruffy bike
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Another amusing story --

I've always made my wines from backyard fruit. Even the mead was made from a friend's honey from his own hives. I've only deviated from that once, when the local organic market had a huge sale on blueberries, so I got two full flats of blueberries to make a batch.

So I'm standing in line, and the guy behind me asks what I'm planning to do with 20+ pounds of blueberries, so I tell him, and he then responds with his own "homebrew" story, making something he called "Pruno".

Turns out "Pruno" is a jail thing. The inmate with the strongest bladder volunteers his stainless steel toilet to brew in (since that means that he only gets to "go" during the daily exercise break after that), and the inmates all contribute their desserts -- pudding, fruitcups, cake, whatever -- and some bread is tossed in to provide yeast, and in a few weeks you get a fermented glop that will knock you out.

Some days you learn the most interesting things.

PhilB
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hey Phil quick question if you've made it. Since you brought up citrus fruit we have a ton of grapefruit and oranges in my yard. Ever make a grapefruit wine and if so how'd it turn out?
 

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I have 8 gallons of apple wine, 8 gallons of pear and 7 gallons of muscadine. This is my first year doing it but got the knowledge from my dad who has been doing it for about 13 years now. I have to agree it is real easy and cheap. I should be getting about 150 bottles out of all of my wine with an estimated cost of about 2.50 a bottle.
 

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A guy on a scruffy bike
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Hey Phil quick question if you've made it. Since you brought up citrus fruit we have a ton of grapefruit and oranges in my yard. Ever make a grapefruit wine and if so how'd it turn out?
I haven't made grapefruit; my wife hates grapefruit. I expect it would be similar in nature to the orange or the kumquat I have made, both of which turned out quite well. It's not too hard to find recipes. The main thing is that every fruit (other than grapes) needs a little something added to balance it out. Only grapes naturally have all the components to make decent wine (thus why that's the historical norm). For instance, stone fruits (plums, apricots, peaches, etc.) need acid added. Citrus will need some sugar added, and tannins. A winemaking supply store can provide you with the necessary ingredients.

I have 8 gallons of apple wine, 8 gallons of pear and 7 gallons of muscadine. This is my first year doing it but got the knowledge from my dad who has been doing it for about 13 years now. I have to agree it is real easy and cheap. I should be getting about 150 bottles out of all of my wine with an estimated cost of about 2.50 a bottle.
It really is an inexpensive hobby, requiring mostly patience and a little space. I always use homegrown fruit, and have been doing it long enough to amortize my equipment. I re-use bottles. It costs me just about $1 a bottle to make wine, and half of that cost is the cork.

PhilB
 

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Lowlife
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^^Do you prefer the grolsch or regular bottles? why or why not? I was told early on to stick with regular bottles to cap with loose caps...Can't remember the reasoning...but two guys chimed in while I was buying all my first equipment /brew supps.

Oh yeah, a little later than hoped, but I just got done brewing my double chocolate stout....funny while I was brewing I had the stereo on from the basement....song came on "the waiting is the hardest part"...so true.
 
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