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How does the weight savings feel on the road? Did acceleration increase noticeably with the 'butt dyno'? How bout ET's? How about turn in vs stability, does it make a quicker corner but less stable?
 

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big_slacker said:
How does the weight savings feel on the road? Did acceleration increase noticeably with the 'butt dyno'? How bout ET's? How about turn in vs stability, does it make a quicker corner but less stable?
You will notice with the mag/carbon the quicker turns and thats about it, dude.
 

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RESIDENT ASSHOLE
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Ummmm all sportbikes use aluminum for the wheels.

Yes mag is lighter and it does make a difference.

As a matter of fact the single biggest improvement you can make to the bike is unsprung weight. Namely the wheels and brakes. It will accelerate, brake and turn faster.

Downfall is usually the reliability of them. They do not like pot holes.
 

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Aftermarket wheels will probably be one of the best additions to your bike. Though the weight savings on paper will not look like much +/-2~3 lbs for a forged aluminum wheel, but less rotating mass while the bike is running makes a big difference. There's typically 3 types of aftermarket wheels, Magnesium, Carbon, and lastly forged aluminum. All have their pros and cons— the carbon ones for example, are for race bikes who see no street time. BST makes a great carbon wheel, but may be less durable to sustain your everyday "pot hole" street riding. Same thing goes for Magnesium wheels.

The best Bang for buck is forged aluminum. Strong enough for street use, and a great upgrade for your track bike. Not only will you see better acceleration and braking, but the wheels also offer quicker transitioning from side to side on the bike. Thus, offering less rider fatigue. Especially helpful on the track.

When I first installed them on the bike, I was also concerned with the stability since I removed my Scotts damper on the bike. However, I was surprised at how stable they felt on the track/canyons. From now on, the first upgrade I put on any of my bikes will be wheels. Forget the power, exhaust and what not.... less unsprung weight makes a huge difference in how the bike handles!

Here's a pic of my Hi point 6 spokes.
 

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hybrid said:
Ummmm all sportbikes use aluminum for the wheels.

Yes mag is lighter and it does make a difference.

As a matter of fact the single biggest improvement you can make to the bike is unsprung weight. Namely the wheels and brakes. It will accelerate, brake and turn faster.

Downfall is usually the reliability of them. They do not like pot holes.
+1
 

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Now i've heard both sides. I know forged aluminium is stronger then cast every time, you'd think the forged would be less likely to get damaged by something like a pothole, considering it's a superior process to cast.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
hybrid said:
Ummmm all sportbikes use aluminum for the wheels.

Yes mag is lighter and it does make a difference.

As a matter of fact the single biggest improvement you can make to the bike is unsprung weight. Namely the wheels and brakes. It will accelerate, brake and turn faster.

Downfall is usually the reliability of them. They do not like pot holes.
You know what I meant, and forged aluminum racing wheels wouldn't fit in the title.

Thanks for the impression though, what bike/tires did you use?
 

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Good responses.

Besides forged al, mag, or CF, you can just save for a newer bike. That new technique, "control-filled die-casting" supposedly makes nice light wheels now. The VFR should be getting them stock soon I would think.

On new bikes like ZX10r, Gixxers, etc, you guys should check on the weight savings. The savings between the stock control-filled die-cast rims to the forged alum. rims may not be cost effective at all. (Just making a small point to lurkers.)
 

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ninerrider01 said:
Good responses.

Besides forged al, mag, or CF, you can just save for a newer bike. That new technique, "control-filled die-casting" supposedly makes nice light wheels now. The VFR should be getting them stock soon I would think.

On new bikes like ZX10r, Gixxers, etc, you guys should check on the weight savings. The savings between the stock control-filled die-cast rims to the forged alum. rims may not be cost effective at all. (Just making a small point to lurkers.)
I havn't heard of this process, do you know any specifics on it?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
And the point made earlier (running lighter tires) is a valid one as well and much cheaper than wheels. I already have pilot H2's on and turn in is quicker I though because of the tire profile but maybe weight as well?

The 'save for a new bike' doesn't fly if you have a newer bike already. :D Realize that slipons and a PCIII for my bike are around a G, so if I can find some reasonably priced wheels (around $1500 or so) it might be worth considering. Worth asking about at least.
 

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gungho said:
I havn't heard of this process, do you know any specifics on it?
Nah, I'm not good at remembering details. But you can usually see it. Notice the newer spindly, organic looking rims on bikes? That's it. I think R6, CBR600RR, probably ZX10r, new Gix1000 probably all have them. The new swing-arms and frames that look organic also use it.

It's not forged, still cast into the die like before, but they found a way to control wall-thickness better so everything can be minimized to reduce weight without losing strength. Your 1000RR might have some.

To the Interceptor guy- Yeah, if you're happy with your bike, plan to keep it awhile and have the money then mod the hell out of it! :phatyo
 
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